Bahamas Aggressor

0

Liveaboards

Camera

Dive Centers (Coming Soon)

Products

Products

Bahamas Aggressor

  • from USD3,095.00

The Bahamas Aggressor offers year-round diving in the crystal-clear waters of the Bahamas. With only 14 guests on board, there is ample space for everyone to relax and unwind. All cabins are located on the lower deck and are fitted with private en-suite bathrooms, individually controlled AC, TV monitor with media player and hairdryer. There are 5 deluxe staterooms that have 1 lower double bed and one twin upper bunk-bed and also 1 quad cabin with two sets of twin bunk-style beds.Social areas around the Bahamas Aggressor yacht include the roomy, air conditioned salon and dining area with entertainment system, shaded outdoor cocktail deck and lounge and a partially covered sundeck complete with loungers and hot tub.Divers are well taken care of aboard the Bahamas Aggressor, and amenities include a photo editing computer, and a large dive deck with individual dive lockers, camera table with low-pressure air hoses and two fresh water showers with hot water. Itineraries depart from Nassau and visit the Exuma Cays and Southwest Eleuthera to dive the Lost Blue Hole and Periwinkle Reef. During certain times of the year the Bahamas Aggressor heads out to Tiger Beach & Bimini for thrilling dives and up close shark encounters.

01 Jun 2024
8D/7N
[Freeport-Freeport] Grand Bahama West End with Tiger Beach [01 Jun 24 - 08 Jun 24]
Tiger Beach Mount Olympus: The top of the reef is 45-50 feet, down one side you reach the sand ar...
See Itinerary

Tiger Beach

Mount Olympus: The top of the reef is 45-50 feet, down one side you reach the sand around 95 feet, down the other side it just keep going creating a wonderful wall. Guests could spend all day diving this area and never cover all of Mount Olympus.

Mini Wall: This dive site has two mounds running side by side with a small patch of white sand between these mounds covered with marine life. The first of the coral mounds starts around 35 feet and slopes down to around 70 feet. The second mound starts around 40 feet and slopes to about 85 feet. Both mounds as they slope give the look of a small wall.

Hog Fish: A shallow dive ranging from 30-45 feet. As you swim along Hogfish Reef you will notice lots of crevices and ledges to look under for small creatures. A garden of soft corals with hard corals covers the top and schools of Grunts, Snappers, Chromis and Angelfish cover the reef. Swimming in the sandy areas just off the reef are large and small Hogfish.

Shark Paradise: This beautiful reef received its name from the different types of sharks you can find here at any given time. While enjoying the marine life covering Shark Paradise we have seen, Nurse, Caribbean and Lemon Sharks. Once in a while we even get a beautiful Tiger Shark in the area.

Fishtail: Is located just to the south of Shark Paradise. Due to its location we sometimes get a chance to see a shark while diving the beautiful reef which is covered with Gorgonians, Yellow Sea Whips, Sea Plumes, Orange Spiny Sea Rods and Sea Fans. When you can add a mix of hard corals and a variety of lots of tropical fish you have the perfect spot to enjoy.

Sugar Wreck: This is one of the crew members favorite shallow sites. During the late 1800's a barge carrying molasses sank in 18-20 feet of water in the middle of nowhere on the Little Bahama Bank. Soon fish and other marine life found this to be a great hiding place and soon the wreck was covered with marine life. At any given time we can find the resident Green Moray Eel, or Nurse Shark and everyone's favorite, the Hawksbill Turtle that comes up close for pictures and video.

El Dorado: Starting in 40 feet and sloping towards a sandy bottom around 70 feet, guests will enjoy seeing Lobsters, huge Channel Clinging Crabs, Banded Coral Shrimp and schools of fish. At night Octopus, Squid, Turtles resting, Eels swimming out in the open and an array of hard and soft Corals are seen.

El Captainan: A huge underwater mound that is covered with Gorgonians and hard corals. Just off to the side are two large pinnacles. The top of the main mound starts around 45-50 feet and the bottom 90 feet. You can easily follow schools of fish or stay in one small area and look for lots of macro and small animal life.

Tiger Beach: A beautiful beach area that sits in 15 feet of water. There’s a white sandy bottom that seems to always have Sharks. Most of the Sharks seen are Lemon Sharks ranging from 4-7 feet in length. Also seen are Caribbean Reef Sharks, Nurse Sharks and Tiger Sharks.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
08 Jun 2024
8D/7N
[Freeport-Freeport] Grand Bahama West End with Tiger Beach [08 Jun 24 - 15 Jun 24]
Tiger Beach Mount Olympus: The top of the reef is 45-50 feet, down one side you reach the sand ar...
See Itinerary

Tiger Beach

Mount Olympus: The top of the reef is 45-50 feet, down one side you reach the sand around 95 feet, down the other side it just keep going creating a wonderful wall. Guests could spend all day diving this area and never cover all of Mount Olympus.

Mini Wall: This dive site has two mounds running side by side with a small patch of white sand between these mounds covered with marine life. The first of the coral mounds starts around 35 feet and slopes down to around 70 feet. The second mound starts around 40 feet and slopes to about 85 feet. Both mounds as they slope give the look of a small wall.

Hog Fish: A shallow dive ranging from 30-45 feet. As you swim along Hogfish Reef you will notice lots of crevices and ledges to look under for small creatures. A garden of soft corals with hard corals covers the top and schools of Grunts, Snappers, Chromis and Angelfish cover the reef. Swimming in the sandy areas just off the reef are large and small Hogfish.

Shark Paradise: This beautiful reef received its name from the different types of sharks you can find here at any given time. While enjoying the marine life covering Shark Paradise we have seen, Nurse, Caribbean and Lemon Sharks. Once in a while we even get a beautiful Tiger Shark in the area.

Fishtail: Is located just to the south of Shark Paradise. Due to its location we sometimes get a chance to see a shark while diving the beautiful reef which is covered with Gorgonians, Yellow Sea Whips, Sea Plumes, Orange Spiny Sea Rods and Sea Fans. When you can add a mix of hard corals and a variety of lots of tropical fish you have the perfect spot to enjoy.

Sugar Wreck: This is one of the crew members favorite shallow sites. During the late 1800's a barge carrying molasses sank in 18-20 feet of water in the middle of nowhere on the Little Bahama Bank. Soon fish and other marine life found this to be a great hiding place and soon the wreck was covered with marine life. At any given time we can find the resident Green Moray Eel, or Nurse Shark and everyone's favorite, the Hawksbill Turtle that comes up close for pictures and video.

El Dorado: Starting in 40 feet and sloping towards a sandy bottom around 70 feet, guests will enjoy seeing Lobsters, huge Channel Clinging Crabs, Banded Coral Shrimp and schools of fish. At night Octopus, Squid, Turtles resting, Eels swimming out in the open and an array of hard and soft Corals are seen.

El Captainan: A huge underwater mound that is covered with Gorgonians and hard corals. Just off to the side are two large pinnacles. The top of the main mound starts around 45-50 feet and the bottom 90 feet. You can easily follow schools of fish or stay in one small area and look for lots of macro and small animal life.

Tiger Beach: A beautiful beach area that sits in 15 feet of water. There’s a white sandy bottom that seems to always have Sharks. Most of the Sharks seen are Lemon Sharks ranging from 4-7 feet in length. Also seen are Caribbean Reef Sharks, Nurse Sharks and Tiger Sharks.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
15 Jun 2024
8D/7N
[Freeport-Freeport] Grand Bahama West End with Tiger Beach [15 Jun 24 - 22 Jun 24]
Tiger Beach Mount Olympus: The top of the reef is 45-50 feet, down one side you reach the sand ar...
See Itinerary

Tiger Beach

Mount Olympus: The top of the reef is 45-50 feet, down one side you reach the sand around 95 feet, down the other side it just keep going creating a wonderful wall. Guests could spend all day diving this area and never cover all of Mount Olympus.

Mini Wall: This dive site has two mounds running side by side with a small patch of white sand between these mounds covered with marine life. The first of the coral mounds starts around 35 feet and slopes down to around 70 feet. The second mound starts around 40 feet and slopes to about 85 feet. Both mounds as they slope give the look of a small wall.

Hog Fish: A shallow dive ranging from 30-45 feet. As you swim along Hogfish Reef you will notice lots of crevices and ledges to look under for small creatures. A garden of soft corals with hard corals covers the top and schools of Grunts, Snappers, Chromis and Angelfish cover the reef. Swimming in the sandy areas just off the reef are large and small Hogfish.

Shark Paradise: This beautiful reef received its name from the different types of sharks you can find here at any given time. While enjoying the marine life covering Shark Paradise we have seen, Nurse, Caribbean and Lemon Sharks. Once in a while we even get a beautiful Tiger Shark in the area.

Fishtail: Is located just to the south of Shark Paradise. Due to its location we sometimes get a chance to see a shark while diving the beautiful reef which is covered with Gorgonians, Yellow Sea Whips, Sea Plumes, Orange Spiny Sea Rods and Sea Fans. When you can add a mix of hard corals and a variety of lots of tropical fish you have the perfect spot to enjoy.

Sugar Wreck: This is one of the crew members favorite shallow sites. During the late 1800's a barge carrying molasses sank in 18-20 feet of water in the middle of nowhere on the Little Bahama Bank. Soon fish and other marine life found this to be a great hiding place and soon the wreck was covered with marine life. At any given time we can find the resident Green Moray Eel, or Nurse Shark and everyone's favorite, the Hawksbill Turtle that comes up close for pictures and video.

El Dorado: Starting in 40 feet and sloping towards a sandy bottom around 70 feet, guests will enjoy seeing Lobsters, huge Channel Clinging Crabs, Banded Coral Shrimp and schools of fish. At night Octopus, Squid, Turtles resting, Eels swimming out in the open and an array of hard and soft Corals are seen.

El Captainan: A huge underwater mound that is covered with Gorgonians and hard corals. Just off to the side are two large pinnacles. The top of the main mound starts around 45-50 feet and the bottom 90 feet. You can easily follow schools of fish or stay in one small area and look for lots of macro and small animal life.

Tiger Beach: A beautiful beach area that sits in 15 feet of water. There’s a white sandy bottom that seems to always have Sharks. Most of the Sharks seen are Lemon Sharks ranging from 4-7 feet in length. Also seen are Caribbean Reef Sharks, Nurse Sharks and Tiger Sharks.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
22 Jun 2024
8D/7N
[Freeport-Freeport] Grand Bahama West End with Tiger Beach [22 Jun 24 - 29 Jun 24]
Tiger Beach Mount Olympus: The top of the reef is 45-50 feet, down one side you reach the sand ar...
See Itinerary

Tiger Beach

Mount Olympus: The top of the reef is 45-50 feet, down one side you reach the sand around 95 feet, down the other side it just keep going creating a wonderful wall. Guests could spend all day diving this area and never cover all of Mount Olympus.

Mini Wall: This dive site has two mounds running side by side with a small patch of white sand between these mounds covered with marine life. The first of the coral mounds starts around 35 feet and slopes down to around 70 feet. The second mound starts around 40 feet and slopes to about 85 feet. Both mounds as they slope give the look of a small wall.

Hog Fish: A shallow dive ranging from 30-45 feet. As you swim along Hogfish Reef you will notice lots of crevices and ledges to look under for small creatures. A garden of soft corals with hard corals covers the top and schools of Grunts, Snappers, Chromis and Angelfish cover the reef. Swimming in the sandy areas just off the reef are large and small Hogfish.

Shark Paradise: This beautiful reef received its name from the different types of sharks you can find here at any given time. While enjoying the marine life covering Shark Paradise we have seen, Nurse, Caribbean and Lemon Sharks. Once in a while we even get a beautiful Tiger Shark in the area.

Fishtail: Is located just to the south of Shark Paradise. Due to its location we sometimes get a chance to see a shark while diving the beautiful reef which is covered with Gorgonians, Yellow Sea Whips, Sea Plumes, Orange Spiny Sea Rods and Sea Fans. When you can add a mix of hard corals and a variety of lots of tropical fish you have the perfect spot to enjoy.

Sugar Wreck: This is one of the crew members favorite shallow sites. During the late 1800's a barge carrying molasses sank in 18-20 feet of water in the middle of nowhere on the Little Bahama Bank. Soon fish and other marine life found this to be a great hiding place and soon the wreck was covered with marine life. At any given time we can find the resident Green Moray Eel, or Nurse Shark and everyone's favorite, the Hawksbill Turtle that comes up close for pictures and video.

El Dorado: Starting in 40 feet and sloping towards a sandy bottom around 70 feet, guests will enjoy seeing Lobsters, huge Channel Clinging Crabs, Banded Coral Shrimp and schools of fish. At night Octopus, Squid, Turtles resting, Eels swimming out in the open and an array of hard and soft Corals are seen.

El Captainan: A huge underwater mound that is covered with Gorgonians and hard corals. Just off to the side are two large pinnacles. The top of the main mound starts around 45-50 feet and the bottom 90 feet. You can easily follow schools of fish or stay in one small area and look for lots of macro and small animal life.

Tiger Beach: A beautiful beach area that sits in 15 feet of water. There’s a white sandy bottom that seems to always have Sharks. Most of the Sharks seen are Lemon Sharks ranging from 4-7 feet in length. Also seen are Caribbean Reef Sharks, Nurse Sharks and Tiger Sharks.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
29 Jun 2024
8D/7N
[Freeport-Freeport] Grand Bahama West End with Tiger Beach [29 Jun 24 - 06 Jul 24]
Tiger Beach Mount Olympus: The top of the reef is 45-50 feet, down one side you reach the sand ar...
See Itinerary

Tiger Beach

Mount Olympus: The top of the reef is 45-50 feet, down one side you reach the sand around 95 feet, down the other side it just keep going creating a wonderful wall. Guests could spend all day diving this area and never cover all of Mount Olympus.

Mini Wall: This dive site has two mounds running side by side with a small patch of white sand between these mounds covered with marine life. The first of the coral mounds starts around 35 feet and slopes down to around 70 feet. The second mound starts around 40 feet and slopes to about 85 feet. Both mounds as they slope give the look of a small wall.

Hog Fish: A shallow dive ranging from 30-45 feet. As you swim along Hogfish Reef you will notice lots of crevices and ledges to look under for small creatures. A garden of soft corals with hard corals covers the top and schools of Grunts, Snappers, Chromis and Angelfish cover the reef. Swimming in the sandy areas just off the reef are large and small Hogfish.

Shark Paradise: This beautiful reef received its name from the different types of sharks you can find here at any given time. While enjoying the marine life covering Shark Paradise we have seen, Nurse, Caribbean and Lemon Sharks. Once in a while we even get a beautiful Tiger Shark in the area.

Fishtail: Is located just to the south of Shark Paradise. Due to its location we sometimes get a chance to see a shark while diving the beautiful reef which is covered with Gorgonians, Yellow Sea Whips, Sea Plumes, Orange Spiny Sea Rods and Sea Fans. When you can add a mix of hard corals and a variety of lots of tropical fish you have the perfect spot to enjoy.

Sugar Wreck: This is one of the crew members favorite shallow sites. During the late 1800's a barge carrying molasses sank in 18-20 feet of water in the middle of nowhere on the Little Bahama Bank. Soon fish and other marine life found this to be a great hiding place and soon the wreck was covered with marine life. At any given time we can find the resident Green Moray Eel, or Nurse Shark and everyone's favorite, the Hawksbill Turtle that comes up close for pictures and video.

El Dorado: Starting in 40 feet and sloping towards a sandy bottom around 70 feet, guests will enjoy seeing Lobsters, huge Channel Clinging Crabs, Banded Coral Shrimp and schools of fish. At night Octopus, Squid, Turtles resting, Eels swimming out in the open and an array of hard and soft Corals are seen.

El Captainan: A huge underwater mound that is covered with Gorgonians and hard corals. Just off to the side are two large pinnacles. The top of the main mound starts around 45-50 feet and the bottom 90 feet. You can easily follow schools of fish or stay in one small area and look for lots of macro and small animal life.

Tiger Beach: A beautiful beach area that sits in 15 feet of water. There’s a white sandy bottom that seems to always have Sharks. Most of the Sharks seen are Lemon Sharks ranging from 4-7 feet in length. Also seen are Caribbean Reef Sharks, Nurse Sharks and Tiger Sharks.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
06 Jul 2024
8D/7N
[Freeport-Freeport] Grand Bahama West End with Tiger Beach [06 Jul 24 - 13 Jul 24]
Tiger Beach Mount Olympus: The top of the reef is 45-50 feet, down one side you reach the sand ar...
See Itinerary

Tiger Beach

Mount Olympus: The top of the reef is 45-50 feet, down one side you reach the sand around 95 feet, down the other side it just keep going creating a wonderful wall. Guests could spend all day diving this area and never cover all of Mount Olympus.

Mini Wall: This dive site has two mounds running side by side with a small patch of white sand between these mounds covered with marine life. The first of the coral mounds starts around 35 feet and slopes down to around 70 feet. The second mound starts around 40 feet and slopes to about 85 feet. Both mounds as they slope give the look of a small wall.

Hog Fish: A shallow dive ranging from 30-45 feet. As you swim along Hogfish Reef you will notice lots of crevices and ledges to look under for small creatures. A garden of soft corals with hard corals covers the top and schools of Grunts, Snappers, Chromis and Angelfish cover the reef. Swimming in the sandy areas just off the reef are large and small Hogfish.

Shark Paradise: This beautiful reef received its name from the different types of sharks you can find here at any given time. While enjoying the marine life covering Shark Paradise we have seen, Nurse, Caribbean and Lemon Sharks. Once in a while we even get a beautiful Tiger Shark in the area.

Fishtail: Is located just to the south of Shark Paradise. Due to its location we sometimes get a chance to see a shark while diving the beautiful reef which is covered with Gorgonians, Yellow Sea Whips, Sea Plumes, Orange Spiny Sea Rods and Sea Fans. When you can add a mix of hard corals and a variety of lots of tropical fish you have the perfect spot to enjoy.

Sugar Wreck: This is one of the crew members favorite shallow sites. During the late 1800's a barge carrying molasses sank in 18-20 feet of water in the middle of nowhere on the Little Bahama Bank. Soon fish and other marine life found this to be a great hiding place and soon the wreck was covered with marine life. At any given time we can find the resident Green Moray Eel, or Nurse Shark and everyone's favorite, the Hawksbill Turtle that comes up close for pictures and video.

El Dorado: Starting in 40 feet and sloping towards a sandy bottom around 70 feet, guests will enjoy seeing Lobsters, huge Channel Clinging Crabs, Banded Coral Shrimp and schools of fish. At night Octopus, Squid, Turtles resting, Eels swimming out in the open and an array of hard and soft Corals are seen.

El Captainan: A huge underwater mound that is covered with Gorgonians and hard corals. Just off to the side are two large pinnacles. The top of the main mound starts around 45-50 feet and the bottom 90 feet. You can easily follow schools of fish or stay in one small area and look for lots of macro and small animal life.

Tiger Beach: A beautiful beach area that sits in 15 feet of water. There’s a white sandy bottom that seems to always have Sharks. Most of the Sharks seen are Lemon Sharks ranging from 4-7 feet in length. Also seen are Caribbean Reef Sharks, Nurse Sharks and Tiger Sharks.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
14 Jul 2024
7D/6N
[Nassau-Nassau] Exuma Cays and Southwest Eleuthera [14 Jul 24 - 20 Jul 24]
Exuma Cays The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over ...
See Itinerary

Exuma Cays

The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over 120 miles from just south of new Providence to the anchor islands of Great and Little Exuma to the south. The Exuma Cays are a part of the more remote Out Islands of the Bahamas. The Cays are the most exotic of these islands, a collection of sandy jewels set in the aquamarine and sapphire of some of the most beautiful waters in the world along with an intriguing combination of walls and rich shallow reefs.

Nassau

Lost Blue Hole: The rim of this large blue hole lies in 40' of water surrounded by coral heads, stingrays, and many schools of fish. There is a lobster filled crevice at 80'. In the sand surrounding the hole, divers find many small fish such as banded jawfish, Seminole gobies, and tobacco fish. There are usually one or two nurse sharks and during the spring a large school of blacknose sharks inhabits the bottom of the 200' hole.

Periwinkle Reef: This is a shallow patch-reef teaming with fish. The local Nassau tour operators feed fish here, so sergeant majors and angelfish approach scuba divers looking for a handout.

 

Exumas

Amberjack Reef: This 50' patch-reef that has prolific fish life including reef sharks and up to ten large groupers. This dive also has many interesting small critters such as pirate blennies and garden eels. During the safety stop divers may be surrounded by 100+ horse-eye jacks that school under the yacht.

Austin Smith Wreck: A 90' Bahamian Defense Force cutter lying in 60’ of water that, ironically, sank in 1995 while being towed to San Salvador to be sunk there as a dive site.

Barracuda Shoals: This bankside patch reef has huge schools of fish as well as many small critters on the reef and surrounding sand.

Blacktip Wall: Hammerhead sharks have been sighted frequently on this wall. This reef is also where Ned Deloach (the popular Reef Identification books co-author) discovered the rare Lemon goby.

Cathedral: This site is part of the Dog Rocks Reef. This reef starts at 35' and slopes off to 50' before dropping straight down into the Exuma Sound. The “cathedral” is a large swim-through where light filters down from above reflecting off thousands of silversides. This swim-through also has many groupers and jacks that come to feed on the silversides. The wall has large stands of black coral and orange elephant ear and tube sponges. Pelagics such as eagle rays and sharks are frequently seen just off the wall.

Cracked Coral Head: This massive coral head rises 40' off the bottom. Several large swim-thruoughs make it look like it is cracked giving it the name.

Jeep Reef: This site named for a coral-encrusted jeep that sits near the mooring is in the middle of the Exumas Land & Sea Park and hosts a healthy population of fish. It is also one of the prettiest reefs you will ever see. Current that sweeps through this cut keeps the reef 's corals healthy.

Pillar Wall: One of many excellent wall dives. It starts at 30' and slopes to 50' before dropping 5,000' to the bottom. There are many caves and crevices. There is also a large colony of yellowhead jawfish in the rubble inside the reef.


Southwest Eleuthera

Cave Rock: A large coral mound in 50' of water surrounded by several smaller coral heads. There are several caves where you can swim from one side to the other. The large variety of corals and fish will amaze you. Hammerhead sharks have been seen here frequently.

Monolith: Large mounds of coral rise out of the sand at the edge of the wall. They start at 100' depth and rise to 55'. There is a colony of garden eels in the sand next to the mounds.
 

Little San Sal (Half Moon Cay)

Cave Reef: This 40' shallow patch reef has several large swim-throughs cutting in the middle of the reef.

Empress Pinnacles: This wall dive features 30' high pinnacles coming out of the sand at the edge of the wall. Pelagic animals are seen frequently in the clear water off the wall. There are large branches of black coral growing on the sides of the pinnacles.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD2,655.00
20 Jul 2024
8D/7N
[Nassau-Nassau] Exuma Cays and Southwest Eleuthera [20 Jul 24 - 27 Jul 24]
Exuma Cays The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over ...
See Itinerary

Exuma Cays

The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over 120 miles from just south of new Providence to the anchor islands of Great and Little Exuma to the south. The Exuma Cays are a part of the more remote Out Islands of the Bahamas. The Cays are the most exotic of these islands, a collection of sandy jewels set in the aquamarine and sapphire of some of the most beautiful waters in the world along with an intriguing combination of walls and rich shallow reefs.

Nassau

Lost Blue Hole: The rim of this large blue hole lies in 40' of water surrounded by coral heads, stingrays, and many schools of fish. There is a lobster filled crevice at 80'. In the sand surrounding the hole, divers find many small fish such as banded jawfish, Seminole gobies, and tobacco fish. There are usually one or two nurse sharks and during the spring a large school of blacknose sharks inhabits the bottom of the 200' hole.

Periwinkle Reef: This is a shallow patch-reef teaming with fish. The local Nassau tour operators feed fish here, so sergeant majors and angelfish approach scuba divers looking for a handout.

 

Exumas

Amberjack Reef: This 50' patch-reef that has prolific fish life including reef sharks and up to ten large groupers. This dive also has many interesting small critters such as pirate blennies and garden eels. During the safety stop divers may be surrounded by 100+ horse-eye jacks that school under the yacht.

Austin Smith Wreck: A 90' Bahamian Defense Force cutter lying in 60’ of water that, ironically, sank in 1995 while being towed to San Salvador to be sunk there as a dive site.

Barracuda Shoals: This bankside patch reef has huge schools of fish as well as many small critters on the reef and surrounding sand.

Blacktip Wall: Hammerhead sharks have been sighted frequently on this wall. This reef is also where Ned Deloach (the popular Reef Identification books co-author) discovered the rare Lemon goby.

Cathedral: This site is part of the Dog Rocks Reef. This reef starts at 35' and slopes off to 50' before dropping straight down into the Exuma Sound. The “cathedral” is a large swim-through where light filters down from above reflecting off thousands of silversides. This swim-through also has many groupers and jacks that come to feed on the silversides. The wall has large stands of black coral and orange elephant ear and tube sponges. Pelagics such as eagle rays and sharks are frequently seen just off the wall.

Cracked Coral Head: This massive coral head rises 40' off the bottom. Several large swim-thruoughs make it look like it is cracked giving it the name.

Jeep Reef: This site named for a coral-encrusted jeep that sits near the mooring is in the middle of the Exumas Land & Sea Park and hosts a healthy population of fish. It is also one of the prettiest reefs you will ever see. Current that sweeps through this cut keeps the reef 's corals healthy.

Pillar Wall: One of many excellent wall dives. It starts at 30' and slopes to 50' before dropping 5,000' to the bottom. There are many caves and crevices. There is also a large colony of yellowhead jawfish in the rubble inside the reef.


Southwest Eleuthera

Cave Rock: A large coral mound in 50' of water surrounded by several smaller coral heads. There are several caves where you can swim from one side to the other. The large variety of corals and fish will amaze you. Hammerhead sharks have been seen here frequently.

Monolith: Large mounds of coral rise out of the sand at the edge of the wall. They start at 100' depth and rise to 55'. There is a colony of garden eels in the sand next to the mounds.
 

Little San Sal (Half Moon Cay)

Cave Reef: This 40' shallow patch reef has several large swim-throughs cutting in the middle of the reef.

Empress Pinnacles: This wall dive features 30' high pinnacles coming out of the sand at the edge of the wall. Pelagic animals are seen frequently in the clear water off the wall. There are large branches of black coral growing on the sides of the pinnacles.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
27 Jul 2024
8D/7N
[Nassau-Nassau] Exuma Cays and Southwest Eleuthera [27 Jul 24 - 03 Aug 24]
Exuma Cays The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over ...
See Itinerary

Exuma Cays

The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over 120 miles from just south of new Providence to the anchor islands of Great and Little Exuma to the south. The Exuma Cays are a part of the more remote Out Islands of the Bahamas. The Cays are the most exotic of these islands, a collection of sandy jewels set in the aquamarine and sapphire of some of the most beautiful waters in the world along with an intriguing combination of walls and rich shallow reefs.

Nassau

Lost Blue Hole: The rim of this large blue hole lies in 40' of water surrounded by coral heads, stingrays, and many schools of fish. There is a lobster filled crevice at 80'. In the sand surrounding the hole, divers find many small fish such as banded jawfish, Seminole gobies, and tobacco fish. There are usually one or two nurse sharks and during the spring a large school of blacknose sharks inhabits the bottom of the 200' hole.

Periwinkle Reef: This is a shallow patch-reef teaming with fish. The local Nassau tour operators feed fish here, so sergeant majors and angelfish approach scuba divers looking for a handout.

 

Exumas

Amberjack Reef: This 50' patch-reef that has prolific fish life including reef sharks and up to ten large groupers. This dive also has many interesting small critters such as pirate blennies and garden eels. During the safety stop divers may be surrounded by 100+ horse-eye jacks that school under the yacht.

Austin Smith Wreck: A 90' Bahamian Defense Force cutter lying in 60’ of water that, ironically, sank in 1995 while being towed to San Salvador to be sunk there as a dive site.

Barracuda Shoals: This bankside patch reef has huge schools of fish as well as many small critters on the reef and surrounding sand.

Blacktip Wall: Hammerhead sharks have been sighted frequently on this wall. This reef is also where Ned Deloach (the popular Reef Identification books co-author) discovered the rare Lemon goby.

Cathedral: This site is part of the Dog Rocks Reef. This reef starts at 35' and slopes off to 50' before dropping straight down into the Exuma Sound. The “cathedral” is a large swim-through where light filters down from above reflecting off thousands of silversides. This swim-through also has many groupers and jacks that come to feed on the silversides. The wall has large stands of black coral and orange elephant ear and tube sponges. Pelagics such as eagle rays and sharks are frequently seen just off the wall.

Cracked Coral Head: This massive coral head rises 40' off the bottom. Several large swim-thruoughs make it look like it is cracked giving it the name.

Jeep Reef: This site named for a coral-encrusted jeep that sits near the mooring is in the middle of the Exumas Land & Sea Park and hosts a healthy population of fish. It is also one of the prettiest reefs you will ever see. Current that sweeps through this cut keeps the reef 's corals healthy.

Pillar Wall: One of many excellent wall dives. It starts at 30' and slopes to 50' before dropping 5,000' to the bottom. There are many caves and crevices. There is also a large colony of yellowhead jawfish in the rubble inside the reef.


Southwest Eleuthera

Cave Rock: A large coral mound in 50' of water surrounded by several smaller coral heads. There are several caves where you can swim from one side to the other. The large variety of corals and fish will amaze you. Hammerhead sharks have been seen here frequently.

Monolith: Large mounds of coral rise out of the sand at the edge of the wall. They start at 100' depth and rise to 55'. There is a colony of garden eels in the sand next to the mounds.
 

Little San Sal (Half Moon Cay)

Cave Reef: This 40' shallow patch reef has several large swim-throughs cutting in the middle of the reef.

Empress Pinnacles: This wall dive features 30' high pinnacles coming out of the sand at the edge of the wall. Pelagic animals are seen frequently in the clear water off the wall. There are large branches of black coral growing on the sides of the pinnacles.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
03 Aug 2024
8D/7N
[Nassau-Nassau] Exuma Cays and Southwest Eleuthera [03 Aug 24 - 10 Aug 24]
Exuma Cays The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over ...
See Itinerary

Exuma Cays

The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over 120 miles from just south of new Providence to the anchor islands of Great and Little Exuma to the south. The Exuma Cays are a part of the more remote Out Islands of the Bahamas. The Cays are the most exotic of these islands, a collection of sandy jewels set in the aquamarine and sapphire of some of the most beautiful waters in the world along with an intriguing combination of walls and rich shallow reefs.

Nassau

Lost Blue Hole: The rim of this large blue hole lies in 40' of water surrounded by coral heads, stingrays, and many schools of fish. There is a lobster filled crevice at 80'. In the sand surrounding the hole, divers find many small fish such as banded jawfish, Seminole gobies, and tobacco fish. There are usually one or two nurse sharks and during the spring a large school of blacknose sharks inhabits the bottom of the 200' hole.

Periwinkle Reef: This is a shallow patch-reef teaming with fish. The local Nassau tour operators feed fish here, so sergeant majors and angelfish approach scuba divers looking for a handout.

 

Exumas

Amberjack Reef: This 50' patch-reef that has prolific fish life including reef sharks and up to ten large groupers. This dive also has many interesting small critters such as pirate blennies and garden eels. During the safety stop divers may be surrounded by 100+ horse-eye jacks that school under the yacht.

Austin Smith Wreck: A 90' Bahamian Defense Force cutter lying in 60’ of water that, ironically, sank in 1995 while being towed to San Salvador to be sunk there as a dive site.

Barracuda Shoals: This bankside patch reef has huge schools of fish as well as many small critters on the reef and surrounding sand.

Blacktip Wall: Hammerhead sharks have been sighted frequently on this wall. This reef is also where Ned Deloach (the popular Reef Identification books co-author) discovered the rare Lemon goby.

Cathedral: This site is part of the Dog Rocks Reef. This reef starts at 35' and slopes off to 50' before dropping straight down into the Exuma Sound. The “cathedral” is a large swim-through where light filters down from above reflecting off thousands of silversides. This swim-through also has many groupers and jacks that come to feed on the silversides. The wall has large stands of black coral and orange elephant ear and tube sponges. Pelagics such as eagle rays and sharks are frequently seen just off the wall.

Cracked Coral Head: This massive coral head rises 40' off the bottom. Several large swim-thruoughs make it look like it is cracked giving it the name.

Jeep Reef: This site named for a coral-encrusted jeep that sits near the mooring is in the middle of the Exumas Land & Sea Park and hosts a healthy population of fish. It is also one of the prettiest reefs you will ever see. Current that sweeps through this cut keeps the reef 's corals healthy.

Pillar Wall: One of many excellent wall dives. It starts at 30' and slopes to 50' before dropping 5,000' to the bottom. There are many caves and crevices. There is also a large colony of yellowhead jawfish in the rubble inside the reef.


Southwest Eleuthera

Cave Rock: A large coral mound in 50' of water surrounded by several smaller coral heads. There are several caves where you can swim from one side to the other. The large variety of corals and fish will amaze you. Hammerhead sharks have been seen here frequently.

Monolith: Large mounds of coral rise out of the sand at the edge of the wall. They start at 100' depth and rise to 55'. There is a colony of garden eels in the sand next to the mounds.
 

Little San Sal (Half Moon Cay)

Cave Reef: This 40' shallow patch reef has several large swim-throughs cutting in the middle of the reef.

Empress Pinnacles: This wall dive features 30' high pinnacles coming out of the sand at the edge of the wall. Pelagic animals are seen frequently in the clear water off the wall. There are large branches of black coral growing on the sides of the pinnacles.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
10 Aug 2024
8D/7N
[Nassau-Nassau] Exuma Cays and Southwest Eleuthera [10 Aug 24 - 17 Aug 24]
Exuma Cays The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over ...
See Itinerary

Exuma Cays

The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over 120 miles from just south of new Providence to the anchor islands of Great and Little Exuma to the south. The Exuma Cays are a part of the more remote Out Islands of the Bahamas. The Cays are the most exotic of these islands, a collection of sandy jewels set in the aquamarine and sapphire of some of the most beautiful waters in the world along with an intriguing combination of walls and rich shallow reefs.

Nassau

Lost Blue Hole: The rim of this large blue hole lies in 40' of water surrounded by coral heads, stingrays, and many schools of fish. There is a lobster filled crevice at 80'. In the sand surrounding the hole, divers find many small fish such as banded jawfish, Seminole gobies, and tobacco fish. There are usually one or two nurse sharks and during the spring a large school of blacknose sharks inhabits the bottom of the 200' hole.

Periwinkle Reef: This is a shallow patch-reef teaming with fish. The local Nassau tour operators feed fish here, so sergeant majors and angelfish approach scuba divers looking for a handout.

 

Exumas

Amberjack Reef: This 50' patch-reef that has prolific fish life including reef sharks and up to ten large groupers. This dive also has many interesting small critters such as pirate blennies and garden eels. During the safety stop divers may be surrounded by 100+ horse-eye jacks that school under the yacht.

Austin Smith Wreck: A 90' Bahamian Defense Force cutter lying in 60’ of water that, ironically, sank in 1995 while being towed to San Salvador to be sunk there as a dive site.

Barracuda Shoals: This bankside patch reef has huge schools of fish as well as many small critters on the reef and surrounding sand.

Blacktip Wall: Hammerhead sharks have been sighted frequently on this wall. This reef is also where Ned Deloach (the popular Reef Identification books co-author) discovered the rare Lemon goby.

Cathedral: This site is part of the Dog Rocks Reef. This reef starts at 35' and slopes off to 50' before dropping straight down into the Exuma Sound. The “cathedral” is a large swim-through where light filters down from above reflecting off thousands of silversides. This swim-through also has many groupers and jacks that come to feed on the silversides. The wall has large stands of black coral and orange elephant ear and tube sponges. Pelagics such as eagle rays and sharks are frequently seen just off the wall.

Cracked Coral Head: This massive coral head rises 40' off the bottom. Several large swim-thruoughs make it look like it is cracked giving it the name.

Jeep Reef: This site named for a coral-encrusted jeep that sits near the mooring is in the middle of the Exumas Land & Sea Park and hosts a healthy population of fish. It is also one of the prettiest reefs you will ever see. Current that sweeps through this cut keeps the reef 's corals healthy.

Pillar Wall: One of many excellent wall dives. It starts at 30' and slopes to 50' before dropping 5,000' to the bottom. There are many caves and crevices. There is also a large colony of yellowhead jawfish in the rubble inside the reef.


Southwest Eleuthera

Cave Rock: A large coral mound in 50' of water surrounded by several smaller coral heads. There are several caves where you can swim from one side to the other. The large variety of corals and fish will amaze you. Hammerhead sharks have been seen here frequently.

Monolith: Large mounds of coral rise out of the sand at the edge of the wall. They start at 100' depth and rise to 55'. There is a colony of garden eels in the sand next to the mounds.
 

Little San Sal (Half Moon Cay)

Cave Reef: This 40' shallow patch reef has several large swim-throughs cutting in the middle of the reef.

Empress Pinnacles: This wall dive features 30' high pinnacles coming out of the sand at the edge of the wall. Pelagic animals are seen frequently in the clear water off the wall. There are large branches of black coral growing on the sides of the pinnacles.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
17 Aug 2024
8D/7N
[Nassau-Nassau] Exuma Cays and Southwest Eleuthera [17 Aug 24 - 24 Aug 24]
Exuma Cays The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over ...
See Itinerary

Exuma Cays

The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over 120 miles from just south of new Providence to the anchor islands of Great and Little Exuma to the south. The Exuma Cays are a part of the more remote Out Islands of the Bahamas. The Cays are the most exotic of these islands, a collection of sandy jewels set in the aquamarine and sapphire of some of the most beautiful waters in the world along with an intriguing combination of walls and rich shallow reefs.

Nassau

Lost Blue Hole: The rim of this large blue hole lies in 40' of water surrounded by coral heads, stingrays, and many schools of fish. There is a lobster filled crevice at 80'. In the sand surrounding the hole, divers find many small fish such as banded jawfish, Seminole gobies, and tobacco fish. There are usually one or two nurse sharks and during the spring a large school of blacknose sharks inhabits the bottom of the 200' hole.

Periwinkle Reef: This is a shallow patch-reef teaming with fish. The local Nassau tour operators feed fish here, so sergeant majors and angelfish approach scuba divers looking for a handout.

 

Exumas

Amberjack Reef: This 50' patch-reef that has prolific fish life including reef sharks and up to ten large groupers. This dive also has many interesting small critters such as pirate blennies and garden eels. During the safety stop divers may be surrounded by 100+ horse-eye jacks that school under the yacht.

Austin Smith Wreck: A 90' Bahamian Defense Force cutter lying in 60’ of water that, ironically, sank in 1995 while being towed to San Salvador to be sunk there as a dive site.

Barracuda Shoals: This bankside patch reef has huge schools of fish as well as many small critters on the reef and surrounding sand.

Blacktip Wall: Hammerhead sharks have been sighted frequently on this wall. This reef is also where Ned Deloach (the popular Reef Identification books co-author) discovered the rare Lemon goby.

Cathedral: This site is part of the Dog Rocks Reef. This reef starts at 35' and slopes off to 50' before dropping straight down into the Exuma Sound. The “cathedral” is a large swim-through where light filters down from above reflecting off thousands of silversides. This swim-through also has many groupers and jacks that come to feed on the silversides. The wall has large stands of black coral and orange elephant ear and tube sponges. Pelagics such as eagle rays and sharks are frequently seen just off the wall.

Cracked Coral Head: This massive coral head rises 40' off the bottom. Several large swim-thruoughs make it look like it is cracked giving it the name.

Jeep Reef: This site named for a coral-encrusted jeep that sits near the mooring is in the middle of the Exumas Land & Sea Park and hosts a healthy population of fish. It is also one of the prettiest reefs you will ever see. Current that sweeps through this cut keeps the reef 's corals healthy.

Pillar Wall: One of many excellent wall dives. It starts at 30' and slopes to 50' before dropping 5,000' to the bottom. There are many caves and crevices. There is also a large colony of yellowhead jawfish in the rubble inside the reef.


Southwest Eleuthera

Cave Rock: A large coral mound in 50' of water surrounded by several smaller coral heads. There are several caves where you can swim from one side to the other. The large variety of corals and fish will amaze you. Hammerhead sharks have been seen here frequently.

Monolith: Large mounds of coral rise out of the sand at the edge of the wall. They start at 100' depth and rise to 55'. There is a colony of garden eels in the sand next to the mounds.
 

Little San Sal (Half Moon Cay)

Cave Reef: This 40' shallow patch reef has several large swim-throughs cutting in the middle of the reef.

Empress Pinnacles: This wall dive features 30' high pinnacles coming out of the sand at the edge of the wall. Pelagic animals are seen frequently in the clear water off the wall. There are large branches of black coral growing on the sides of the pinnacles.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
31 Aug 2024
8D/7N
[Nassau-Nassau] Exuma Cays and Southwest Eleuthera [31 Aug 24 - 07 Sep 24]
Exuma Cays The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over ...
See Itinerary

Exuma Cays

The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over 120 miles from just south of new Providence to the anchor islands of Great and Little Exuma to the south. The Exuma Cays are a part of the more remote Out Islands of the Bahamas. The Cays are the most exotic of these islands, a collection of sandy jewels set in the aquamarine and sapphire of some of the most beautiful waters in the world along with an intriguing combination of walls and rich shallow reefs.

Nassau

Lost Blue Hole: The rim of this large blue hole lies in 40' of water surrounded by coral heads, stingrays, and many schools of fish. There is a lobster filled crevice at 80'. In the sand surrounding the hole, divers find many small fish such as banded jawfish, Seminole gobies, and tobacco fish. There are usually one or two nurse sharks and during the spring a large school of blacknose sharks inhabits the bottom of the 200' hole.

Periwinkle Reef: This is a shallow patch-reef teaming with fish. The local Nassau tour operators feed fish here, so sergeant majors and angelfish approach scuba divers looking for a handout.

 

Exumas

Amberjack Reef: This 50' patch-reef that has prolific fish life including reef sharks and up to ten large groupers. This dive also has many interesting small critters such as pirate blennies and garden eels. During the safety stop divers may be surrounded by 100+ horse-eye jacks that school under the yacht.

Austin Smith Wreck: A 90' Bahamian Defense Force cutter lying in 60’ of water that, ironically, sank in 1995 while being towed to San Salvador to be sunk there as a dive site.

Barracuda Shoals: This bankside patch reef has huge schools of fish as well as many small critters on the reef and surrounding sand.

Blacktip Wall: Hammerhead sharks have been sighted frequently on this wall. This reef is also where Ned Deloach (the popular Reef Identification books co-author) discovered the rare Lemon goby.

Cathedral: This site is part of the Dog Rocks Reef. This reef starts at 35' and slopes off to 50' before dropping straight down into the Exuma Sound. The “cathedral” is a large swim-through where light filters down from above reflecting off thousands of silversides. This swim-through also has many groupers and jacks that come to feed on the silversides. The wall has large stands of black coral and orange elephant ear and tube sponges. Pelagics such as eagle rays and sharks are frequently seen just off the wall.

Cracked Coral Head: This massive coral head rises 40' off the bottom. Several large swim-thruoughs make it look like it is cracked giving it the name.

Jeep Reef: This site named for a coral-encrusted jeep that sits near the mooring is in the middle of the Exumas Land & Sea Park and hosts a healthy population of fish. It is also one of the prettiest reefs you will ever see. Current that sweeps through this cut keeps the reef 's corals healthy.

Pillar Wall: One of many excellent wall dives. It starts at 30' and slopes to 50' before dropping 5,000' to the bottom. There are many caves and crevices. There is also a large colony of yellowhead jawfish in the rubble inside the reef.


Southwest Eleuthera

Cave Rock: A large coral mound in 50' of water surrounded by several smaller coral heads. There are several caves where you can swim from one side to the other. The large variety of corals and fish will amaze you. Hammerhead sharks have been seen here frequently.

Monolith: Large mounds of coral rise out of the sand at the edge of the wall. They start at 100' depth and rise to 55'. There is a colony of garden eels in the sand next to the mounds.
 

Little San Sal (Half Moon Cay)

Cave Reef: This 40' shallow patch reef has several large swim-throughs cutting in the middle of the reef.

Empress Pinnacles: This wall dive features 30' high pinnacles coming out of the sand at the edge of the wall. Pelagic animals are seen frequently in the clear water off the wall. There are large branches of black coral growing on the sides of the pinnacles.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
07 Sep 2024
8D/7N
[Nassau-Nassau] Exuma Cays and Southwest Eleuthera [07 Sep 24 - 14 Sep 24]
Exuma Cays The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over ...
See Itinerary

Exuma Cays

The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over 120 miles from just south of new Providence to the anchor islands of Great and Little Exuma to the south. The Exuma Cays are a part of the more remote Out Islands of the Bahamas. The Cays are the most exotic of these islands, a collection of sandy jewels set in the aquamarine and sapphire of some of the most beautiful waters in the world along with an intriguing combination of walls and rich shallow reefs.

Nassau

Lost Blue Hole: The rim of this large blue hole lies in 40' of water surrounded by coral heads, stingrays, and many schools of fish. There is a lobster filled crevice at 80'. In the sand surrounding the hole, divers find many small fish such as banded jawfish, Seminole gobies, and tobacco fish. There are usually one or two nurse sharks and during the spring a large school of blacknose sharks inhabits the bottom of the 200' hole.

Periwinkle Reef: This is a shallow patch-reef teaming with fish. The local Nassau tour operators feed fish here, so sergeant majors and angelfish approach scuba divers looking for a handout.

 

Exumas

Amberjack Reef: This 50' patch-reef that has prolific fish life including reef sharks and up to ten large groupers. This dive also has many interesting small critters such as pirate blennies and garden eels. During the safety stop divers may be surrounded by 100+ horse-eye jacks that school under the yacht.

Austin Smith Wreck: A 90' Bahamian Defense Force cutter lying in 60’ of water that, ironically, sank in 1995 while being towed to San Salvador to be sunk there as a dive site.

Barracuda Shoals: This bankside patch reef has huge schools of fish as well as many small critters on the reef and surrounding sand.

Blacktip Wall: Hammerhead sharks have been sighted frequently on this wall. This reef is also where Ned Deloach (the popular Reef Identification books co-author) discovered the rare Lemon goby.

Cathedral: This site is part of the Dog Rocks Reef. This reef starts at 35' and slopes off to 50' before dropping straight down into the Exuma Sound. The “cathedral” is a large swim-through where light filters down from above reflecting off thousands of silversides. This swim-through also has many groupers and jacks that come to feed on the silversides. The wall has large stands of black coral and orange elephant ear and tube sponges. Pelagics such as eagle rays and sharks are frequently seen just off the wall.

Cracked Coral Head: This massive coral head rises 40' off the bottom. Several large swim-thruoughs make it look like it is cracked giving it the name.

Jeep Reef: This site named for a coral-encrusted jeep that sits near the mooring is in the middle of the Exumas Land & Sea Park and hosts a healthy population of fish. It is also one of the prettiest reefs you will ever see. Current that sweeps through this cut keeps the reef 's corals healthy.

Pillar Wall: One of many excellent wall dives. It starts at 30' and slopes to 50' before dropping 5,000' to the bottom. There are many caves and crevices. There is also a large colony of yellowhead jawfish in the rubble inside the reef.


Southwest Eleuthera

Cave Rock: A large coral mound in 50' of water surrounded by several smaller coral heads. There are several caves where you can swim from one side to the other. The large variety of corals and fish will amaze you. Hammerhead sharks have been seen here frequently.

Monolith: Large mounds of coral rise out of the sand at the edge of the wall. They start at 100' depth and rise to 55'. There is a colony of garden eels in the sand next to the mounds.
 

Little San Sal (Half Moon Cay)

Cave Reef: This 40' shallow patch reef has several large swim-throughs cutting in the middle of the reef.

Empress Pinnacles: This wall dive features 30' high pinnacles coming out of the sand at the edge of the wall. Pelagic animals are seen frequently in the clear water off the wall. There are large branches of black coral growing on the sides of the pinnacles.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
14 Sep 2024
8D/7N
[Nassau-Nassau] Exuma Cays and Southwest Eleuthera [14 Sep 24 - 21 Sep 24]
Exuma Cays The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over ...
See Itinerary

Exuma Cays

The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over 120 miles from just south of new Providence to the anchor islands of Great and Little Exuma to the south. The Exuma Cays are a part of the more remote Out Islands of the Bahamas. The Cays are the most exotic of these islands, a collection of sandy jewels set in the aquamarine and sapphire of some of the most beautiful waters in the world along with an intriguing combination of walls and rich shallow reefs.

Nassau

Lost Blue Hole: The rim of this large blue hole lies in 40' of water surrounded by coral heads, stingrays, and many schools of fish. There is a lobster filled crevice at 80'. In the sand surrounding the hole, divers find many small fish such as banded jawfish, Seminole gobies, and tobacco fish. There are usually one or two nurse sharks and during the spring a large school of blacknose sharks inhabits the bottom of the 200' hole.

Periwinkle Reef: This is a shallow patch-reef teaming with fish. The local Nassau tour operators feed fish here, so sergeant majors and angelfish approach scuba divers looking for a handout.

 

Exumas

Amberjack Reef: This 50' patch-reef that has prolific fish life including reef sharks and up to ten large groupers. This dive also has many interesting small critters such as pirate blennies and garden eels. During the safety stop divers may be surrounded by 100+ horse-eye jacks that school under the yacht.

Austin Smith Wreck: A 90' Bahamian Defense Force cutter lying in 60’ of water that, ironically, sank in 1995 while being towed to San Salvador to be sunk there as a dive site.

Barracuda Shoals: This bankside patch reef has huge schools of fish as well as many small critters on the reef and surrounding sand.

Blacktip Wall: Hammerhead sharks have been sighted frequently on this wall. This reef is also where Ned Deloach (the popular Reef Identification books co-author) discovered the rare Lemon goby.

Cathedral: This site is part of the Dog Rocks Reef. This reef starts at 35' and slopes off to 50' before dropping straight down into the Exuma Sound. The “cathedral” is a large swim-through where light filters down from above reflecting off thousands of silversides. This swim-through also has many groupers and jacks that come to feed on the silversides. The wall has large stands of black coral and orange elephant ear and tube sponges. Pelagics such as eagle rays and sharks are frequently seen just off the wall.

Cracked Coral Head: This massive coral head rises 40' off the bottom. Several large swim-thruoughs make it look like it is cracked giving it the name.

Jeep Reef: This site named for a coral-encrusted jeep that sits near the mooring is in the middle of the Exumas Land & Sea Park and hosts a healthy population of fish. It is also one of the prettiest reefs you will ever see. Current that sweeps through this cut keeps the reef 's corals healthy.

Pillar Wall: One of many excellent wall dives. It starts at 30' and slopes to 50' before dropping 5,000' to the bottom. There are many caves and crevices. There is also a large colony of yellowhead jawfish in the rubble inside the reef.


Southwest Eleuthera

Cave Rock: A large coral mound in 50' of water surrounded by several smaller coral heads. There are several caves where you can swim from one side to the other. The large variety of corals and fish will amaze you. Hammerhead sharks have been seen here frequently.

Monolith: Large mounds of coral rise out of the sand at the edge of the wall. They start at 100' depth and rise to 55'. There is a colony of garden eels in the sand next to the mounds.
 

Little San Sal (Half Moon Cay)

Cave Reef: This 40' shallow patch reef has several large swim-throughs cutting in the middle of the reef.

Empress Pinnacles: This wall dive features 30' high pinnacles coming out of the sand at the edge of the wall. Pelagic animals are seen frequently in the clear water off the wall. There are large branches of black coral growing on the sides of the pinnacles.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
21 Sep 2024
8D/7N
[Nassau-Nassau] Exuma Cays and Southwest Eleuthera [21 Sep 24 - 28 Sep 24]
Exuma Cays The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over ...
See Itinerary

Exuma Cays

The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over 120 miles from just south of new Providence to the anchor islands of Great and Little Exuma to the south. The Exuma Cays are a part of the more remote Out Islands of the Bahamas. The Cays are the most exotic of these islands, a collection of sandy jewels set in the aquamarine and sapphire of some of the most beautiful waters in the world along with an intriguing combination of walls and rich shallow reefs.

Nassau

Lost Blue Hole: The rim of this large blue hole lies in 40' of water surrounded by coral heads, stingrays, and many schools of fish. There is a lobster filled crevice at 80'. In the sand surrounding the hole, divers find many small fish such as banded jawfish, Seminole gobies, and tobacco fish. There are usually one or two nurse sharks and during the spring a large school of blacknose sharks inhabits the bottom of the 200' hole.

Periwinkle Reef: This is a shallow patch-reef teaming with fish. The local Nassau tour operators feed fish here, so sergeant majors and angelfish approach scuba divers looking for a handout.

 

Exumas

Amberjack Reef: This 50' patch-reef that has prolific fish life including reef sharks and up to ten large groupers. This dive also has many interesting small critters such as pirate blennies and garden eels. During the safety stop divers may be surrounded by 100+ horse-eye jacks that school under the yacht.

Austin Smith Wreck: A 90' Bahamian Defense Force cutter lying in 60’ of water that, ironically, sank in 1995 while being towed to San Salvador to be sunk there as a dive site.

Barracuda Shoals: This bankside patch reef has huge schools of fish as well as many small critters on the reef and surrounding sand.

Blacktip Wall: Hammerhead sharks have been sighted frequently on this wall. This reef is also where Ned Deloach (the popular Reef Identification books co-author) discovered the rare Lemon goby.

Cathedral: This site is part of the Dog Rocks Reef. This reef starts at 35' and slopes off to 50' before dropping straight down into the Exuma Sound. The “cathedral” is a large swim-through where light filters down from above reflecting off thousands of silversides. This swim-through also has many groupers and jacks that come to feed on the silversides. The wall has large stands of black coral and orange elephant ear and tube sponges. Pelagics such as eagle rays and sharks are frequently seen just off the wall.

Cracked Coral Head: This massive coral head rises 40' off the bottom. Several large swim-thruoughs make it look like it is cracked giving it the name.

Jeep Reef: This site named for a coral-encrusted jeep that sits near the mooring is in the middle of the Exumas Land & Sea Park and hosts a healthy population of fish. It is also one of the prettiest reefs you will ever see. Current that sweeps through this cut keeps the reef 's corals healthy.

Pillar Wall: One of many excellent wall dives. It starts at 30' and slopes to 50' before dropping 5,000' to the bottom. There are many caves and crevices. There is also a large colony of yellowhead jawfish in the rubble inside the reef.


Southwest Eleuthera

Cave Rock: A large coral mound in 50' of water surrounded by several smaller coral heads. There are several caves where you can swim from one side to the other. The large variety of corals and fish will amaze you. Hammerhead sharks have been seen here frequently.

Monolith: Large mounds of coral rise out of the sand at the edge of the wall. They start at 100' depth and rise to 55'. There is a colony of garden eels in the sand next to the mounds.
 

Little San Sal (Half Moon Cay)

Cave Reef: This 40' shallow patch reef has several large swim-throughs cutting in the middle of the reef.

Empress Pinnacles: This wall dive features 30' high pinnacles coming out of the sand at the edge of the wall. Pelagic animals are seen frequently in the clear water off the wall. There are large branches of black coral growing on the sides of the pinnacles.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
02 Nov 2024
8D/7N
[Nassau-Nassau] Exuma Cays and Southwest Eleuthera [02 Nov 24 - 09 Nov 24]
Exuma Cays The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over ...
See Itinerary

Exuma Cays

The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over 120 miles from just south of new Providence to the anchor islands of Great and Little Exuma to the south. The Exuma Cays are a part of the more remote Out Islands of the Bahamas. The Cays are the most exotic of these islands, a collection of sandy jewels set in the aquamarine and sapphire of some of the most beautiful waters in the world along with an intriguing combination of walls and rich shallow reefs.

Nassau

Lost Blue Hole: The rim of this large blue hole lies in 40' of water surrounded by coral heads, stingrays, and many schools of fish. There is a lobster filled crevice at 80'. In the sand surrounding the hole, divers find many small fish such as banded jawfish, Seminole gobies, and tobacco fish. There are usually one or two nurse sharks and during the spring a large school of blacknose sharks inhabits the bottom of the 200' hole.

Periwinkle Reef: This is a shallow patch-reef teaming with fish. The local Nassau tour operators feed fish here, so sergeant majors and angelfish approach scuba divers looking for a handout.

 

Exumas

Amberjack Reef: This 50' patch-reef that has prolific fish life including reef sharks and up to ten large groupers. This dive also has many interesting small critters such as pirate blennies and garden eels. During the safety stop divers may be surrounded by 100+ horse-eye jacks that school under the yacht.

Austin Smith Wreck: A 90' Bahamian Defense Force cutter lying in 60’ of water that, ironically, sank in 1995 while being towed to San Salvador to be sunk there as a dive site.

Barracuda Shoals: This bankside patch reef has huge schools of fish as well as many small critters on the reef and surrounding sand.

Blacktip Wall: Hammerhead sharks have been sighted frequently on this wall. This reef is also where Ned Deloach (the popular Reef Identification books co-author) discovered the rare Lemon goby.

Cathedral: This site is part of the Dog Rocks Reef. This reef starts at 35' and slopes off to 50' before dropping straight down into the Exuma Sound. The “cathedral” is a large swim-through where light filters down from above reflecting off thousands of silversides. This swim-through also has many groupers and jacks that come to feed on the silversides. The wall has large stands of black coral and orange elephant ear and tube sponges. Pelagics such as eagle rays and sharks are frequently seen just off the wall.

Cracked Coral Head: This massive coral head rises 40' off the bottom. Several large swim-thruoughs make it look like it is cracked giving it the name.

Jeep Reef: This site named for a coral-encrusted jeep that sits near the mooring is in the middle of the Exumas Land & Sea Park and hosts a healthy population of fish. It is also one of the prettiest reefs you will ever see. Current that sweeps through this cut keeps the reef 's corals healthy.

Pillar Wall: One of many excellent wall dives. It starts at 30' and slopes to 50' before dropping 5,000' to the bottom. There are many caves and crevices. There is also a large colony of yellowhead jawfish in the rubble inside the reef.


Southwest Eleuthera

Cave Rock: A large coral mound in 50' of water surrounded by several smaller coral heads. There are several caves where you can swim from one side to the other. The large variety of corals and fish will amaze you. Hammerhead sharks have been seen here frequently.

Monolith: Large mounds of coral rise out of the sand at the edge of the wall. They start at 100' depth and rise to 55'. There is a colony of garden eels in the sand next to the mounds.
 

Little San Sal (Half Moon Cay)

Cave Reef: This 40' shallow patch reef has several large swim-throughs cutting in the middle of the reef.

Empress Pinnacles: This wall dive features 30' high pinnacles coming out of the sand at the edge of the wall. Pelagic animals are seen frequently in the clear water off the wall. There are large branches of black coral growing on the sides of the pinnacles.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
09 Nov 2024
8D/7N
[Nassau-Nassau] Exuma Cays and Southwest Eleuthera [09 Nov 24 - 16 Nov 24]
Exuma Cays The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over ...
See Itinerary

Exuma Cays

The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over 120 miles from just south of new Providence to the anchor islands of Great and Little Exuma to the south. The Exuma Cays are a part of the more remote Out Islands of the Bahamas. The Cays are the most exotic of these islands, a collection of sandy jewels set in the aquamarine and sapphire of some of the most beautiful waters in the world along with an intriguing combination of walls and rich shallow reefs.

Nassau

Lost Blue Hole: The rim of this large blue hole lies in 40' of water surrounded by coral heads, stingrays, and many schools of fish. There is a lobster filled crevice at 80'. In the sand surrounding the hole, divers find many small fish such as banded jawfish, Seminole gobies, and tobacco fish. There are usually one or two nurse sharks and during the spring a large school of blacknose sharks inhabits the bottom of the 200' hole.

Periwinkle Reef: This is a shallow patch-reef teaming with fish. The local Nassau tour operators feed fish here, so sergeant majors and angelfish approach scuba divers looking for a handout.

 

Exumas

Amberjack Reef: This 50' patch-reef that has prolific fish life including reef sharks and up to ten large groupers. This dive also has many interesting small critters such as pirate blennies and garden eels. During the safety stop divers may be surrounded by 100+ horse-eye jacks that school under the yacht.

Austin Smith Wreck: A 90' Bahamian Defense Force cutter lying in 60’ of water that, ironically, sank in 1995 while being towed to San Salvador to be sunk there as a dive site.

Barracuda Shoals: This bankside patch reef has huge schools of fish as well as many small critters on the reef and surrounding sand.

Blacktip Wall: Hammerhead sharks have been sighted frequently on this wall. This reef is also where Ned Deloach (the popular Reef Identification books co-author) discovered the rare Lemon goby.

Cathedral: This site is part of the Dog Rocks Reef. This reef starts at 35' and slopes off to 50' before dropping straight down into the Exuma Sound. The “cathedral” is a large swim-through where light filters down from above reflecting off thousands of silversides. This swim-through also has many groupers and jacks that come to feed on the silversides. The wall has large stands of black coral and orange elephant ear and tube sponges. Pelagics such as eagle rays and sharks are frequently seen just off the wall.

Cracked Coral Head: This massive coral head rises 40' off the bottom. Several large swim-thruoughs make it look like it is cracked giving it the name.

Jeep Reef: This site named for a coral-encrusted jeep that sits near the mooring is in the middle of the Exumas Land & Sea Park and hosts a healthy population of fish. It is also one of the prettiest reefs you will ever see. Current that sweeps through this cut keeps the reef 's corals healthy.

Pillar Wall: One of many excellent wall dives. It starts at 30' and slopes to 50' before dropping 5,000' to the bottom. There are many caves and crevices. There is also a large colony of yellowhead jawfish in the rubble inside the reef.


Southwest Eleuthera

Cave Rock: A large coral mound in 50' of water surrounded by several smaller coral heads. There are several caves where you can swim from one side to the other. The large variety of corals and fish will amaze you. Hammerhead sharks have been seen here frequently.

Monolith: Large mounds of coral rise out of the sand at the edge of the wall. They start at 100' depth and rise to 55'. There is a colony of garden eels in the sand next to the mounds.
 

Little San Sal (Half Moon Cay)

Cave Reef: This 40' shallow patch reef has several large swim-throughs cutting in the middle of the reef.

Empress Pinnacles: This wall dive features 30' high pinnacles coming out of the sand at the edge of the wall. Pelagic animals are seen frequently in the clear water off the wall. There are large branches of black coral growing on the sides of the pinnacles.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
16 Nov 2024
8D/7N
[Nassau-Nassau] Exuma Cays and Southwest Eleuthera [16 Nov 24 - 23 Nov 24]
Exuma Cays The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over ...
See Itinerary

Exuma Cays

The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over 120 miles from just south of new Providence to the anchor islands of Great and Little Exuma to the south. The Exuma Cays are a part of the more remote Out Islands of the Bahamas. The Cays are the most exotic of these islands, a collection of sandy jewels set in the aquamarine and sapphire of some of the most beautiful waters in the world along with an intriguing combination of walls and rich shallow reefs.

Nassau

Lost Blue Hole: The rim of this large blue hole lies in 40' of water surrounded by coral heads, stingrays, and many schools of fish. There is a lobster filled crevice at 80'. In the sand surrounding the hole, divers find many small fish such as banded jawfish, Seminole gobies, and tobacco fish. There are usually one or two nurse sharks and during the spring a large school of blacknose sharks inhabits the bottom of the 200' hole.

Periwinkle Reef: This is a shallow patch-reef teaming with fish. The local Nassau tour operators feed fish here, so sergeant majors and angelfish approach scuba divers looking for a handout.

 

Exumas

Amberjack Reef: This 50' patch-reef that has prolific fish life including reef sharks and up to ten large groupers. This dive also has many interesting small critters such as pirate blennies and garden eels. During the safety stop divers may be surrounded by 100+ horse-eye jacks that school under the yacht.

Austin Smith Wreck: A 90' Bahamian Defense Force cutter lying in 60’ of water that, ironically, sank in 1995 while being towed to San Salvador to be sunk there as a dive site.

Barracuda Shoals: This bankside patch reef has huge schools of fish as well as many small critters on the reef and surrounding sand.

Blacktip Wall: Hammerhead sharks have been sighted frequently on this wall. This reef is also where Ned Deloach (the popular Reef Identification books co-author) discovered the rare Lemon goby.

Cathedral: This site is part of the Dog Rocks Reef. This reef starts at 35' and slopes off to 50' before dropping straight down into the Exuma Sound. The “cathedral” is a large swim-through where light filters down from above reflecting off thousands of silversides. This swim-through also has many groupers and jacks that come to feed on the silversides. The wall has large stands of black coral and orange elephant ear and tube sponges. Pelagics such as eagle rays and sharks are frequently seen just off the wall.

Cracked Coral Head: This massive coral head rises 40' off the bottom. Several large swim-thruoughs make it look like it is cracked giving it the name.

Jeep Reef: This site named for a coral-encrusted jeep that sits near the mooring is in the middle of the Exumas Land & Sea Park and hosts a healthy population of fish. It is also one of the prettiest reefs you will ever see. Current that sweeps through this cut keeps the reef 's corals healthy.

Pillar Wall: One of many excellent wall dives. It starts at 30' and slopes to 50' before dropping 5,000' to the bottom. There are many caves and crevices. There is also a large colony of yellowhead jawfish in the rubble inside the reef.


Southwest Eleuthera

Cave Rock: A large coral mound in 50' of water surrounded by several smaller coral heads. There are several caves where you can swim from one side to the other. The large variety of corals and fish will amaze you. Hammerhead sharks have been seen here frequently.

Monolith: Large mounds of coral rise out of the sand at the edge of the wall. They start at 100' depth and rise to 55'. There is a colony of garden eels in the sand next to the mounds.
 

Little San Sal (Half Moon Cay)

Cave Reef: This 40' shallow patch reef has several large swim-throughs cutting in the middle of the reef.

Empress Pinnacles: This wall dive features 30' high pinnacles coming out of the sand at the edge of the wall. Pelagic animals are seen frequently in the clear water off the wall. There are large branches of black coral growing on the sides of the pinnacles.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
23 Nov 2024
8D/7N
[Nassau-Nassau] Exuma Cays and Southwest Eleuthera [23 Nov 24 - 30 Nov 24]
Exuma Cays The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over ...
See Itinerary

Exuma Cays

The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over 120 miles from just south of new Providence to the anchor islands of Great and Little Exuma to the south. The Exuma Cays are a part of the more remote Out Islands of the Bahamas. The Cays are the most exotic of these islands, a collection of sandy jewels set in the aquamarine and sapphire of some of the most beautiful waters in the world along with an intriguing combination of walls and rich shallow reefs.

Nassau

Lost Blue Hole: The rim of this large blue hole lies in 40' of water surrounded by coral heads, stingrays, and many schools of fish. There is a lobster filled crevice at 80'. In the sand surrounding the hole, divers find many small fish such as banded jawfish, Seminole gobies, and tobacco fish. There are usually one or two nurse sharks and during the spring a large school of blacknose sharks inhabits the bottom of the 200' hole.

Periwinkle Reef: This is a shallow patch-reef teaming with fish. The local Nassau tour operators feed fish here, so sergeant majors and angelfish approach scuba divers looking for a handout.

 

Exumas

Amberjack Reef: This 50' patch-reef that has prolific fish life including reef sharks and up to ten large groupers. This dive also has many interesting small critters such as pirate blennies and garden eels. During the safety stop divers may be surrounded by 100+ horse-eye jacks that school under the yacht.

Austin Smith Wreck: A 90' Bahamian Defense Force cutter lying in 60’ of water that, ironically, sank in 1995 while being towed to San Salvador to be sunk there as a dive site.

Barracuda Shoals: This bankside patch reef has huge schools of fish as well as many small critters on the reef and surrounding sand.

Blacktip Wall: Hammerhead sharks have been sighted frequently on this wall. This reef is also where Ned Deloach (the popular Reef Identification books co-author) discovered the rare Lemon goby.

Cathedral: This site is part of the Dog Rocks Reef. This reef starts at 35' and slopes off to 50' before dropping straight down into the Exuma Sound. The “cathedral” is a large swim-through where light filters down from above reflecting off thousands of silversides. This swim-through also has many groupers and jacks that come to feed on the silversides. The wall has large stands of black coral and orange elephant ear and tube sponges. Pelagics such as eagle rays and sharks are frequently seen just off the wall.

Cracked Coral Head: This massive coral head rises 40' off the bottom. Several large swim-thruoughs make it look like it is cracked giving it the name.

Jeep Reef: This site named for a coral-encrusted jeep that sits near the mooring is in the middle of the Exumas Land & Sea Park and hosts a healthy population of fish. It is also one of the prettiest reefs you will ever see. Current that sweeps through this cut keeps the reef 's corals healthy.

Pillar Wall: One of many excellent wall dives. It starts at 30' and slopes to 50' before dropping 5,000' to the bottom. There are many caves and crevices. There is also a large colony of yellowhead jawfish in the rubble inside the reef.


Southwest Eleuthera

Cave Rock: A large coral mound in 50' of water surrounded by several smaller coral heads. There are several caves where you can swim from one side to the other. The large variety of corals and fish will amaze you. Hammerhead sharks have been seen here frequently.

Monolith: Large mounds of coral rise out of the sand at the edge of the wall. They start at 100' depth and rise to 55'. There is a colony of garden eels in the sand next to the mounds.
 

Little San Sal (Half Moon Cay)

Cave Reef: This 40' shallow patch reef has several large swim-throughs cutting in the middle of the reef.

Empress Pinnacles: This wall dive features 30' high pinnacles coming out of the sand at the edge of the wall. Pelagic animals are seen frequently in the clear water off the wall. There are large branches of black coral growing on the sides of the pinnacles.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
30 Nov 2024
8D/7N
[Nassau-Nassau] Exuma Cays and Southwest Eleuthera [30 Nov 24 - 07 Dec 24]
Exuma Cays The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over ...
See Itinerary

Exuma Cays

The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over 120 miles from just south of new Providence to the anchor islands of Great and Little Exuma to the south. The Exuma Cays are a part of the more remote Out Islands of the Bahamas. The Cays are the most exotic of these islands, a collection of sandy jewels set in the aquamarine and sapphire of some of the most beautiful waters in the world along with an intriguing combination of walls and rich shallow reefs.

Nassau

Lost Blue Hole: The rim of this large blue hole lies in 40' of water surrounded by coral heads, stingrays, and many schools of fish. There is a lobster filled crevice at 80'. In the sand surrounding the hole, divers find many small fish such as banded jawfish, Seminole gobies, and tobacco fish. There are usually one or two nurse sharks and during the spring a large school of blacknose sharks inhabits the bottom of the 200' hole.

Periwinkle Reef: This is a shallow patch-reef teaming with fish. The local Nassau tour operators feed fish here, so sergeant majors and angelfish approach scuba divers looking for a handout.

 

Exumas

Amberjack Reef: This 50' patch-reef that has prolific fish life including reef sharks and up to ten large groupers. This dive also has many interesting small critters such as pirate blennies and garden eels. During the safety stop divers may be surrounded by 100+ horse-eye jacks that school under the yacht.

Austin Smith Wreck: A 90' Bahamian Defense Force cutter lying in 60’ of water that, ironically, sank in 1995 while being towed to San Salvador to be sunk there as a dive site.

Barracuda Shoals: This bankside patch reef has huge schools of fish as well as many small critters on the reef and surrounding sand.

Blacktip Wall: Hammerhead sharks have been sighted frequently on this wall. This reef is also where Ned Deloach (the popular Reef Identification books co-author) discovered the rare Lemon goby.

Cathedral: This site is part of the Dog Rocks Reef. This reef starts at 35' and slopes off to 50' before dropping straight down into the Exuma Sound. The “cathedral” is a large swim-through where light filters down from above reflecting off thousands of silversides. This swim-through also has many groupers and jacks that come to feed on the silversides. The wall has large stands of black coral and orange elephant ear and tube sponges. Pelagics such as eagle rays and sharks are frequently seen just off the wall.

Cracked Coral Head: This massive coral head rises 40' off the bottom. Several large swim-thruoughs make it look like it is cracked giving it the name.

Jeep Reef: This site named for a coral-encrusted jeep that sits near the mooring is in the middle of the Exumas Land & Sea Park and hosts a healthy population of fish. It is also one of the prettiest reefs you will ever see. Current that sweeps through this cut keeps the reef 's corals healthy.

Pillar Wall: One of many excellent wall dives. It starts at 30' and slopes to 50' before dropping 5,000' to the bottom. There are many caves and crevices. There is also a large colony of yellowhead jawfish in the rubble inside the reef.


Southwest Eleuthera

Cave Rock: A large coral mound in 50' of water surrounded by several smaller coral heads. There are several caves where you can swim from one side to the other. The large variety of corals and fish will amaze you. Hammerhead sharks have been seen here frequently.

Monolith: Large mounds of coral rise out of the sand at the edge of the wall. They start at 100' depth and rise to 55'. There is a colony of garden eels in the sand next to the mounds.
 

Little San Sal (Half Moon Cay)

Cave Reef: This 40' shallow patch reef has several large swim-throughs cutting in the middle of the reef.

Empress Pinnacles: This wall dive features 30' high pinnacles coming out of the sand at the edge of the wall. Pelagic animals are seen frequently in the clear water off the wall. There are large branches of black coral growing on the sides of the pinnacles.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
07 Dec 2024
8D/7N
[Nassau-Nassau] Exuma Cays and Southwest Eleuthera [07 Dec 24 - 14 Dec 24]
Exuma Cays The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over ...
See Itinerary

Exuma Cays

The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over 120 miles from just south of new Providence to the anchor islands of Great and Little Exuma to the south. The Exuma Cays are a part of the more remote Out Islands of the Bahamas. The Cays are the most exotic of these islands, a collection of sandy jewels set in the aquamarine and sapphire of some of the most beautiful waters in the world along with an intriguing combination of walls and rich shallow reefs.

Nassau

Lost Blue Hole: The rim of this large blue hole lies in 40' of water surrounded by coral heads, stingrays, and many schools of fish. There is a lobster filled crevice at 80'. In the sand surrounding the hole, divers find many small fish such as banded jawfish, Seminole gobies, and tobacco fish. There are usually one or two nurse sharks and during the spring a large school of blacknose sharks inhabits the bottom of the 200' hole.

Periwinkle Reef: This is a shallow patch-reef teaming with fish. The local Nassau tour operators feed fish here, so sergeant majors and angelfish approach scuba divers looking for a handout.

 

Exumas

Amberjack Reef: This 50' patch-reef that has prolific fish life including reef sharks and up to ten large groupers. This dive also has many interesting small critters such as pirate blennies and garden eels. During the safety stop divers may be surrounded by 100+ horse-eye jacks that school under the yacht.

Austin Smith Wreck: A 90' Bahamian Defense Force cutter lying in 60’ of water that, ironically, sank in 1995 while being towed to San Salvador to be sunk there as a dive site.

Barracuda Shoals: This bankside patch reef has huge schools of fish as well as many small critters on the reef and surrounding sand.

Blacktip Wall: Hammerhead sharks have been sighted frequently on this wall. This reef is also where Ned Deloach (the popular Reef Identification books co-author) discovered the rare Lemon goby.

Cathedral: This site is part of the Dog Rocks Reef. This reef starts at 35' and slopes off to 50' before dropping straight down into the Exuma Sound. The “cathedral” is a large swim-through where light filters down from above reflecting off thousands of silversides. This swim-through also has many groupers and jacks that come to feed on the silversides. The wall has large stands of black coral and orange elephant ear and tube sponges. Pelagics such as eagle rays and sharks are frequently seen just off the wall.

Cracked Coral Head: This massive coral head rises 40' off the bottom. Several large swim-thruoughs make it look like it is cracked giving it the name.

Jeep Reef: This site named for a coral-encrusted jeep that sits near the mooring is in the middle of the Exumas Land & Sea Park and hosts a healthy population of fish. It is also one of the prettiest reefs you will ever see. Current that sweeps through this cut keeps the reef 's corals healthy.

Pillar Wall: One of many excellent wall dives. It starts at 30' and slopes to 50' before dropping 5,000' to the bottom. There are many caves and crevices. There is also a large colony of yellowhead jawfish in the rubble inside the reef.


Southwest Eleuthera

Cave Rock: A large coral mound in 50' of water surrounded by several smaller coral heads. There are several caves where you can swim from one side to the other. The large variety of corals and fish will amaze you. Hammerhead sharks have been seen here frequently.

Monolith: Large mounds of coral rise out of the sand at the edge of the wall. They start at 100' depth and rise to 55'. There is a colony of garden eels in the sand next to the mounds.
 

Little San Sal (Half Moon Cay)

Cave Reef: This 40' shallow patch reef has several large swim-throughs cutting in the middle of the reef.

Empress Pinnacles: This wall dive features 30' high pinnacles coming out of the sand at the edge of the wall. Pelagic animals are seen frequently in the clear water off the wall. There are large branches of black coral growing on the sides of the pinnacles.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
14 Dec 2024
8D/7N
[Nassau-Nassau] Exuma Cays and Southwest Eleuthera [14 Dec 24 - 21 Dec 24]
Exuma Cays The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over ...
See Itinerary

Exuma Cays

The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over 120 miles from just south of new Providence to the anchor islands of Great and Little Exuma to the south. The Exuma Cays are a part of the more remote Out Islands of the Bahamas. The Cays are the most exotic of these islands, a collection of sandy jewels set in the aquamarine and sapphire of some of the most beautiful waters in the world along with an intriguing combination of walls and rich shallow reefs.

Nassau

Lost Blue Hole: The rim of this large blue hole lies in 40' of water surrounded by coral heads, stingrays, and many schools of fish. There is a lobster filled crevice at 80'. In the sand surrounding the hole, divers find many small fish such as banded jawfish, Seminole gobies, and tobacco fish. There are usually one or two nurse sharks and during the spring a large school of blacknose sharks inhabits the bottom of the 200' hole.

Periwinkle Reef: This is a shallow patch-reef teaming with fish. The local Nassau tour operators feed fish here, so sergeant majors and angelfish approach scuba divers looking for a handout.

 

Exumas

Amberjack Reef: This 50' patch-reef that has prolific fish life including reef sharks and up to ten large groupers. This dive also has many interesting small critters such as pirate blennies and garden eels. During the safety stop divers may be surrounded by 100+ horse-eye jacks that school under the yacht.

Austin Smith Wreck: A 90' Bahamian Defense Force cutter lying in 60’ of water that, ironically, sank in 1995 while being towed to San Salvador to be sunk there as a dive site.

Barracuda Shoals: This bankside patch reef has huge schools of fish as well as many small critters on the reef and surrounding sand.

Blacktip Wall: Hammerhead sharks have been sighted frequently on this wall. This reef is also where Ned Deloach (the popular Reef Identification books co-author) discovered the rare Lemon goby.

Cathedral: This site is part of the Dog Rocks Reef. This reef starts at 35' and slopes off to 50' before dropping straight down into the Exuma Sound. The “cathedral” is a large swim-through where light filters down from above reflecting off thousands of silversides. This swim-through also has many groupers and jacks that come to feed on the silversides. The wall has large stands of black coral and orange elephant ear and tube sponges. Pelagics such as eagle rays and sharks are frequently seen just off the wall.

Cracked Coral Head: This massive coral head rises 40' off the bottom. Several large swim-thruoughs make it look like it is cracked giving it the name.

Jeep Reef: This site named for a coral-encrusted jeep that sits near the mooring is in the middle of the Exumas Land & Sea Park and hosts a healthy population of fish. It is also one of the prettiest reefs you will ever see. Current that sweeps through this cut keeps the reef 's corals healthy.

Pillar Wall: One of many excellent wall dives. It starts at 30' and slopes to 50' before dropping 5,000' to the bottom. There are many caves and crevices. There is also a large colony of yellowhead jawfish in the rubble inside the reef.


Southwest Eleuthera

Cave Rock: A large coral mound in 50' of water surrounded by several smaller coral heads. There are several caves where you can swim from one side to the other. The large variety of corals and fish will amaze you. Hammerhead sharks have been seen here frequently.

Monolith: Large mounds of coral rise out of the sand at the edge of the wall. They start at 100' depth and rise to 55'. There is a colony of garden eels in the sand next to the mounds.
 

Little San Sal (Half Moon Cay)

Cave Reef: This 40' shallow patch reef has several large swim-throughs cutting in the middle of the reef.

Empress Pinnacles: This wall dive features 30' high pinnacles coming out of the sand at the edge of the wall. Pelagic animals are seen frequently in the clear water off the wall. There are large branches of black coral growing on the sides of the pinnacles.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
21 Dec 2024
8D/7N
[Nassau-Nassau] Exuma Cays and Southwest Eleuthera [21 Dec 24 - 28 Dec 24]
Exuma Cays The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over ...
See Itinerary

Exuma Cays

The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over 120 miles from just south of new Providence to the anchor islands of Great and Little Exuma to the south. The Exuma Cays are a part of the more remote Out Islands of the Bahamas. The Cays are the most exotic of these islands, a collection of sandy jewels set in the aquamarine and sapphire of some of the most beautiful waters in the world along with an intriguing combination of walls and rich shallow reefs.

Nassau

Lost Blue Hole: The rim of this large blue hole lies in 40' of water surrounded by coral heads, stingrays, and many schools of fish. There is a lobster filled crevice at 80'. In the sand surrounding the hole, divers find many small fish such as banded jawfish, Seminole gobies, and tobacco fish. There are usually one or two nurse sharks and during the spring a large school of blacknose sharks inhabits the bottom of the 200' hole.

Periwinkle Reef: This is a shallow patch-reef teaming with fish. The local Nassau tour operators feed fish here, so sergeant majors and angelfish approach scuba divers looking for a handout.

 

Exumas

Amberjack Reef: This 50' patch-reef that has prolific fish life including reef sharks and up to ten large groupers. This dive also has many interesting small critters such as pirate blennies and garden eels. During the safety stop divers may be surrounded by 100+ horse-eye jacks that school under the yacht.

Austin Smith Wreck: A 90' Bahamian Defense Force cutter lying in 60’ of water that, ironically, sank in 1995 while being towed to San Salvador to be sunk there as a dive site.

Barracuda Shoals: This bankside patch reef has huge schools of fish as well as many small critters on the reef and surrounding sand.

Blacktip Wall: Hammerhead sharks have been sighted frequently on this wall. This reef is also where Ned Deloach (the popular Reef Identification books co-author) discovered the rare Lemon goby.

Cathedral: This site is part of the Dog Rocks Reef. This reef starts at 35' and slopes off to 50' before dropping straight down into the Exuma Sound. The “cathedral” is a large swim-through where light filters down from above reflecting off thousands of silversides. This swim-through also has many groupers and jacks that come to feed on the silversides. The wall has large stands of black coral and orange elephant ear and tube sponges. Pelagics such as eagle rays and sharks are frequently seen just off the wall.

Cracked Coral Head: This massive coral head rises 40' off the bottom. Several large swim-thruoughs make it look like it is cracked giving it the name.

Jeep Reef: This site named for a coral-encrusted jeep that sits near the mooring is in the middle of the Exumas Land & Sea Park and hosts a healthy population of fish. It is also one of the prettiest reefs you will ever see. Current that sweeps through this cut keeps the reef 's corals healthy.

Pillar Wall: One of many excellent wall dives. It starts at 30' and slopes to 50' before dropping 5,000' to the bottom. There are many caves and crevices. There is also a large colony of yellowhead jawfish in the rubble inside the reef.


Southwest Eleuthera

Cave Rock: A large coral mound in 50' of water surrounded by several smaller coral heads. There are several caves where you can swim from one side to the other. The large variety of corals and fish will amaze you. Hammerhead sharks have been seen here frequently.

Monolith: Large mounds of coral rise out of the sand at the edge of the wall. They start at 100' depth and rise to 55'. There is a colony of garden eels in the sand next to the mounds.
 

Little San Sal (Half Moon Cay)

Cave Reef: This 40' shallow patch reef has several large swim-throughs cutting in the middle of the reef.

Empress Pinnacles: This wall dive features 30' high pinnacles coming out of the sand at the edge of the wall. Pelagic animals are seen frequently in the clear water off the wall. There are large branches of black coral growing on the sides of the pinnacles.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
28 Dec 2024
8D/7N
[Nassau-Nassau] Exuma Cays and Southwest Eleuthera [28 Dec 24 - 04 Jan 25]
Exuma Cays The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over ...
See Itinerary

Exuma Cays

The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over 120 miles from just south of new Providence to the anchor islands of Great and Little Exuma to the south. The Exuma Cays are a part of the more remote Out Islands of the Bahamas. The Cays are the most exotic of these islands, a collection of sandy jewels set in the aquamarine and sapphire of some of the most beautiful waters in the world along with an intriguing combination of walls and rich shallow reefs.

Nassau

Lost Blue Hole: The rim of this large blue hole lies in 40' of water surrounded by coral heads, stingrays, and many schools of fish. There is a lobster filled crevice at 80'. In the sand surrounding the hole, divers find many small fish such as banded jawfish, Seminole gobies, and tobacco fish. There are usually one or two nurse sharks and during the spring a large school of blacknose sharks inhabits the bottom of the 200' hole.

Periwinkle Reef: This is a shallow patch-reef teaming with fish. The local Nassau tour operators feed fish here, so sergeant majors and angelfish approach scuba divers looking for a handout.

 

Exumas

Amberjack Reef: This 50' patch-reef that has prolific fish life including reef sharks and up to ten large groupers. This dive also has many interesting small critters such as pirate blennies and garden eels. During the safety stop divers may be surrounded by 100+ horse-eye jacks that school under the yacht.

Austin Smith Wreck: A 90' Bahamian Defense Force cutter lying in 60’ of water that, ironically, sank in 1995 while being towed to San Salvador to be sunk there as a dive site.

Barracuda Shoals: This bankside patch reef has huge schools of fish as well as many small critters on the reef and surrounding sand.

Blacktip Wall: Hammerhead sharks have been sighted frequently on this wall. This reef is also where Ned Deloach (the popular Reef Identification books co-author) discovered the rare Lemon goby.

Cathedral: This site is part of the Dog Rocks Reef. This reef starts at 35' and slopes off to 50' before dropping straight down into the Exuma Sound. The “cathedral” is a large swim-through where light filters down from above reflecting off thousands of silversides. This swim-through also has many groupers and jacks that come to feed on the silversides. The wall has large stands of black coral and orange elephant ear and tube sponges. Pelagics such as eagle rays and sharks are frequently seen just off the wall.

Cracked Coral Head: This massive coral head rises 40' off the bottom. Several large swim-thruoughs make it look like it is cracked giving it the name.

Jeep Reef: This site named for a coral-encrusted jeep that sits near the mooring is in the middle of the Exumas Land & Sea Park and hosts a healthy population of fish. It is also one of the prettiest reefs you will ever see. Current that sweeps through this cut keeps the reef 's corals healthy.

Pillar Wall: One of many excellent wall dives. It starts at 30' and slopes to 50' before dropping 5,000' to the bottom. There are many caves and crevices. There is also a large colony of yellowhead jawfish in the rubble inside the reef.


Southwest Eleuthera

Cave Rock: A large coral mound in 50' of water surrounded by several smaller coral heads. There are several caves where you can swim from one side to the other. The large variety of corals and fish will amaze you. Hammerhead sharks have been seen here frequently.

Monolith: Large mounds of coral rise out of the sand at the edge of the wall. They start at 100' depth and rise to 55'. There is a colony of garden eels in the sand next to the mounds.
 

Little San Sal (Half Moon Cay)

Cave Reef: This 40' shallow patch reef has several large swim-throughs cutting in the middle of the reef.

Empress Pinnacles: This wall dive features 30' high pinnacles coming out of the sand at the edge of the wall. Pelagic animals are seen frequently in the clear water off the wall. There are large branches of black coral growing on the sides of the pinnacles.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
04 Jan 2025
8D/7N
[Nassau-Nassau] Exuma Cays and Southwest Eleuthera [04 Jan 25 - 11 Jan 25]
Exuma Cays The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over ...
See Itinerary

Exuma Cays

The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over 120 miles from just south of new Providence to the anchor islands of Great and Little Exuma to the south. The Exuma Cays are a part of the more remote Out Islands of the Bahamas. The Cays are the most exotic of these islands, a collection of sandy jewels set in the aquamarine and sapphire of some of the most beautiful waters in the world along with an intriguing combination of walls and rich shallow reefs.

Nassau

Lost Blue Hole: The rim of this large blue hole lies in 40' of water surrounded by coral heads, stingrays, and many schools of fish. There is a lobster filled crevice at 80'. In the sand surrounding the hole, divers find many small fish such as banded jawfish, Seminole gobies, and tobacco fish. There are usually one or two nurse sharks and during the spring a large school of blacknose sharks inhabits the bottom of the 200' hole.

Periwinkle Reef: This is a shallow patch-reef teaming with fish. The local Nassau tour operators feed fish here, so sergeant majors and angelfish approach scuba divers looking for a handout.

 

Exumas

Amberjack Reef: This 50' patch-reef that has prolific fish life including reef sharks and up to ten large groupers. This dive also has many interesting small critters such as pirate blennies and garden eels. During the safety stop divers may be surrounded by 100+ horse-eye jacks that school under the yacht.

Austin Smith Wreck: A 90' Bahamian Defense Force cutter lying in 60’ of water that, ironically, sank in 1995 while being towed to San Salvador to be sunk there as a dive site.

Barracuda Shoals: This bankside patch reef has huge schools of fish as well as many small critters on the reef and surrounding sand.

Blacktip Wall: Hammerhead sharks have been sighted frequently on this wall. This reef is also where Ned Deloach (the popular Reef Identification books co-author) discovered the rare Lemon goby.

Cathedral: This site is part of the Dog Rocks Reef. This reef starts at 35' and slopes off to 50' before dropping straight down into the Exuma Sound. The “cathedral” is a large swim-through where light filters down from above reflecting off thousands of silversides. This swim-through also has many groupers and jacks that come to feed on the silversides. The wall has large stands of black coral and orange elephant ear and tube sponges. Pelagics such as eagle rays and sharks are frequently seen just off the wall.

Cracked Coral Head: This massive coral head rises 40' off the bottom. Several large swim-thruoughs make it look like it is cracked giving it the name.

Jeep Reef: This site named for a coral-encrusted jeep that sits near the mooring is in the middle of the Exumas Land & Sea Park and hosts a healthy population of fish. It is also one of the prettiest reefs you will ever see. Current that sweeps through this cut keeps the reef 's corals healthy.

Pillar Wall: One of many excellent wall dives. It starts at 30' and slopes to 50' before dropping 5,000' to the bottom. There are many caves and crevices. There is also a large colony of yellowhead jawfish in the rubble inside the reef.


Southwest Eleuthera

Cave Rock: A large coral mound in 50' of water surrounded by several smaller coral heads. There are several caves where you can swim from one side to the other. The large variety of corals and fish will amaze you. Hammerhead sharks have been seen here frequently.

Monolith: Large mounds of coral rise out of the sand at the edge of the wall. They start at 100' depth and rise to 55'. There is a colony of garden eels in the sand next to the mounds.
 

Little San Sal (Half Moon Cay)

Cave Reef: This 40' shallow patch reef has several large swim-throughs cutting in the middle of the reef.

Empress Pinnacles: This wall dive features 30' high pinnacles coming out of the sand at the edge of the wall. Pelagic animals are seen frequently in the clear water off the wall. There are large branches of black coral growing on the sides of the pinnacles.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
11 Jan 2025
8D/7N
[Nassau-Nassau] Exuma Cays and Southwest Eleuthera [11 Jan 25 - 18 Jan 25]
Exuma Cays The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over ...
See Itinerary

Exuma Cays

The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over 120 miles from just south of new Providence to the anchor islands of Great and Little Exuma to the south. The Exuma Cays are a part of the more remote Out Islands of the Bahamas. The Cays are the most exotic of these islands, a collection of sandy jewels set in the aquamarine and sapphire of some of the most beautiful waters in the world along with an intriguing combination of walls and rich shallow reefs.

Nassau

Lost Blue Hole: The rim of this large blue hole lies in 40' of water surrounded by coral heads, stingrays, and many schools of fish. There is a lobster filled crevice at 80'. In the sand surrounding the hole, divers find many small fish such as banded jawfish, Seminole gobies, and tobacco fish. There are usually one or two nurse sharks and during the spring a large school of blacknose sharks inhabits the bottom of the 200' hole.

Periwinkle Reef: This is a shallow patch-reef teaming with fish. The local Nassau tour operators feed fish here, so sergeant majors and angelfish approach scuba divers looking for a handout.

 

Exumas

Amberjack Reef: This 50' patch-reef that has prolific fish life including reef sharks and up to ten large groupers. This dive also has many interesting small critters such as pirate blennies and garden eels. During the safety stop divers may be surrounded by 100+ horse-eye jacks that school under the yacht.

Austin Smith Wreck: A 90' Bahamian Defense Force cutter lying in 60’ of water that, ironically, sank in 1995 while being towed to San Salvador to be sunk there as a dive site.

Barracuda Shoals: This bankside patch reef has huge schools of fish as well as many small critters on the reef and surrounding sand.

Blacktip Wall: Hammerhead sharks have been sighted frequently on this wall. This reef is also where Ned Deloach (the popular Reef Identification books co-author) discovered the rare Lemon goby.

Cathedral: This site is part of the Dog Rocks Reef. This reef starts at 35' and slopes off to 50' before dropping straight down into the Exuma Sound. The “cathedral” is a large swim-through where light filters down from above reflecting off thousands of silversides. This swim-through also has many groupers and jacks that come to feed on the silversides. The wall has large stands of black coral and orange elephant ear and tube sponges. Pelagics such as eagle rays and sharks are frequently seen just off the wall.

Cracked Coral Head: This massive coral head rises 40' off the bottom. Several large swim-thruoughs make it look like it is cracked giving it the name.

Jeep Reef: This site named for a coral-encrusted jeep that sits near the mooring is in the middle of the Exumas Land & Sea Park and hosts a healthy population of fish. It is also one of the prettiest reefs you will ever see. Current that sweeps through this cut keeps the reef 's corals healthy.

Pillar Wall: One of many excellent wall dives. It starts at 30' and slopes to 50' before dropping 5,000' to the bottom. There are many caves and crevices. There is also a large colony of yellowhead jawfish in the rubble inside the reef.


Southwest Eleuthera

Cave Rock: A large coral mound in 50' of water surrounded by several smaller coral heads. There are several caves where you can swim from one side to the other. The large variety of corals and fish will amaze you. Hammerhead sharks have been seen here frequently.

Monolith: Large mounds of coral rise out of the sand at the edge of the wall. They start at 100' depth and rise to 55'. There is a colony of garden eels in the sand next to the mounds.
 

Little San Sal (Half Moon Cay)

Cave Reef: This 40' shallow patch reef has several large swim-throughs cutting in the middle of the reef.

Empress Pinnacles: This wall dive features 30' high pinnacles coming out of the sand at the edge of the wall. Pelagic animals are seen frequently in the clear water off the wall. There are large branches of black coral growing on the sides of the pinnacles.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
18 Jan 2025
8D/7N
[Nassau-Nassau] Exuma Cays and Southwest Eleuthera [18 Jan 25 - 25 Jan 25]
Exuma Cays The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over ...
See Itinerary

Exuma Cays

The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over 120 miles from just south of new Providence to the anchor islands of Great and Little Exuma to the south. The Exuma Cays are a part of the more remote Out Islands of the Bahamas. The Cays are the most exotic of these islands, a collection of sandy jewels set in the aquamarine and sapphire of some of the most beautiful waters in the world along with an intriguing combination of walls and rich shallow reefs.

Nassau

Lost Blue Hole: The rim of this large blue hole lies in 40' of water surrounded by coral heads, stingrays, and many schools of fish. There is a lobster filled crevice at 80'. In the sand surrounding the hole, divers find many small fish such as banded jawfish, Seminole gobies, and tobacco fish. There are usually one or two nurse sharks and during the spring a large school of blacknose sharks inhabits the bottom of the 200' hole.

Periwinkle Reef: This is a shallow patch-reef teaming with fish. The local Nassau tour operators feed fish here, so sergeant majors and angelfish approach scuba divers looking for a handout.

 

Exumas

Amberjack Reef: This 50' patch-reef that has prolific fish life including reef sharks and up to ten large groupers. This dive also has many interesting small critters such as pirate blennies and garden eels. During the safety stop divers may be surrounded by 100+ horse-eye jacks that school under the yacht.

Austin Smith Wreck: A 90' Bahamian Defense Force cutter lying in 60’ of water that, ironically, sank in 1995 while being towed to San Salvador to be sunk there as a dive site.

Barracuda Shoals: This bankside patch reef has huge schools of fish as well as many small critters on the reef and surrounding sand.

Blacktip Wall: Hammerhead sharks have been sighted frequently on this wall. This reef is also where Ned Deloach (the popular Reef Identification books co-author) discovered the rare Lemon goby.

Cathedral: This site is part of the Dog Rocks Reef. This reef starts at 35' and slopes off to 50' before dropping straight down into the Exuma Sound. The “cathedral” is a large swim-through where light filters down from above reflecting off thousands of silversides. This swim-through also has many groupers and jacks that come to feed on the silversides. The wall has large stands of black coral and orange elephant ear and tube sponges. Pelagics such as eagle rays and sharks are frequently seen just off the wall.

Cracked Coral Head: This massive coral head rises 40' off the bottom. Several large swim-thruoughs make it look like it is cracked giving it the name.

Jeep Reef: This site named for a coral-encrusted jeep that sits near the mooring is in the middle of the Exumas Land & Sea Park and hosts a healthy population of fish. It is also one of the prettiest reefs you will ever see. Current that sweeps through this cut keeps the reef 's corals healthy.

Pillar Wall: One of many excellent wall dives. It starts at 30' and slopes to 50' before dropping 5,000' to the bottom. There are many caves and crevices. There is also a large colony of yellowhead jawfish in the rubble inside the reef.


Southwest Eleuthera

Cave Rock: A large coral mound in 50' of water surrounded by several smaller coral heads. There are several caves where you can swim from one side to the other. The large variety of corals and fish will amaze you. Hammerhead sharks have been seen here frequently.

Monolith: Large mounds of coral rise out of the sand at the edge of the wall. They start at 100' depth and rise to 55'. There is a colony of garden eels in the sand next to the mounds.
 

Little San Sal (Half Moon Cay)

Cave Reef: This 40' shallow patch reef has several large swim-throughs cutting in the middle of the reef.

Empress Pinnacles: This wall dive features 30' high pinnacles coming out of the sand at the edge of the wall. Pelagic animals are seen frequently in the clear water off the wall. There are large branches of black coral growing on the sides of the pinnacles.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
25 Jan 2025
8D/7N
[Nassau-Nassau] Exuma Cays and Southwest Eleuthera [25 Jan 25 - 01 Feb 25]
Exuma Cays The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over ...
See Itinerary

Exuma Cays

The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over 120 miles from just south of new Providence to the anchor islands of Great and Little Exuma to the south. The Exuma Cays are a part of the more remote Out Islands of the Bahamas. The Cays are the most exotic of these islands, a collection of sandy jewels set in the aquamarine and sapphire of some of the most beautiful waters in the world along with an intriguing combination of walls and rich shallow reefs.

Nassau

Lost Blue Hole: The rim of this large blue hole lies in 40' of water surrounded by coral heads, stingrays, and many schools of fish. There is a lobster filled crevice at 80'. In the sand surrounding the hole, divers find many small fish such as banded jawfish, Seminole gobies, and tobacco fish. There are usually one or two nurse sharks and during the spring a large school of blacknose sharks inhabits the bottom of the 200' hole.

Periwinkle Reef: This is a shallow patch-reef teaming with fish. The local Nassau tour operators feed fish here, so sergeant majors and angelfish approach scuba divers looking for a handout.

 

Exumas

Amberjack Reef: This 50' patch-reef that has prolific fish life including reef sharks and up to ten large groupers. This dive also has many interesting small critters such as pirate blennies and garden eels. During the safety stop divers may be surrounded by 100+ horse-eye jacks that school under the yacht.

Austin Smith Wreck: A 90' Bahamian Defense Force cutter lying in 60’ of water that, ironically, sank in 1995 while being towed to San Salvador to be sunk there as a dive site.

Barracuda Shoals: This bankside patch reef has huge schools of fish as well as many small critters on the reef and surrounding sand.

Blacktip Wall: Hammerhead sharks have been sighted frequently on this wall. This reef is also where Ned Deloach (the popular Reef Identification books co-author) discovered the rare Lemon goby.

Cathedral: This site is part of the Dog Rocks Reef. This reef starts at 35' and slopes off to 50' before dropping straight down into the Exuma Sound. The “cathedral” is a large swim-through where light filters down from above reflecting off thousands of silversides. This swim-through also has many groupers and jacks that come to feed on the silversides. The wall has large stands of black coral and orange elephant ear and tube sponges. Pelagics such as eagle rays and sharks are frequently seen just off the wall.

Cracked Coral Head: This massive coral head rises 40' off the bottom. Several large swim-thruoughs make it look like it is cracked giving it the name.

Jeep Reef: This site named for a coral-encrusted jeep that sits near the mooring is in the middle of the Exumas Land & Sea Park and hosts a healthy population of fish. It is also one of the prettiest reefs you will ever see. Current that sweeps through this cut keeps the reef 's corals healthy.

Pillar Wall: One of many excellent wall dives. It starts at 30' and slopes to 50' before dropping 5,000' to the bottom. There are many caves and crevices. There is also a large colony of yellowhead jawfish in the rubble inside the reef.


Southwest Eleuthera

Cave Rock: A large coral mound in 50' of water surrounded by several smaller coral heads. There are several caves where you can swim from one side to the other. The large variety of corals and fish will amaze you. Hammerhead sharks have been seen here frequently.

Monolith: Large mounds of coral rise out of the sand at the edge of the wall. They start at 100' depth and rise to 55'. There is a colony of garden eels in the sand next to the mounds.
 

Little San Sal (Half Moon Cay)

Cave Reef: This 40' shallow patch reef has several large swim-throughs cutting in the middle of the reef.

Empress Pinnacles: This wall dive features 30' high pinnacles coming out of the sand at the edge of the wall. Pelagic animals are seen frequently in the clear water off the wall. There are large branches of black coral growing on the sides of the pinnacles.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
01 Feb 2025
8D/7N
[Nassau-Nassau] Exuma Cays and Southwest Eleuthera [01 Feb 25 - 08 Feb 25]
Exuma Cays The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over ...
See Itinerary

Exuma Cays

The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over 120 miles from just south of new Providence to the anchor islands of Great and Little Exuma to the south. The Exuma Cays are a part of the more remote Out Islands of the Bahamas. The Cays are the most exotic of these islands, a collection of sandy jewels set in the aquamarine and sapphire of some of the most beautiful waters in the world along with an intriguing combination of walls and rich shallow reefs.

Nassau

Lost Blue Hole: The rim of this large blue hole lies in 40' of water surrounded by coral heads, stingrays, and many schools of fish. There is a lobster filled crevice at 80'. In the sand surrounding the hole, divers find many small fish such as banded jawfish, Seminole gobies, and tobacco fish. There are usually one or two nurse sharks and during the spring a large school of blacknose sharks inhabits the bottom of the 200' hole.

Periwinkle Reef: This is a shallow patch-reef teaming with fish. The local Nassau tour operators feed fish here, so sergeant majors and angelfish approach scuba divers looking for a handout.

 

Exumas

Amberjack Reef: This 50' patch-reef that has prolific fish life including reef sharks and up to ten large groupers. This dive also has many interesting small critters such as pirate blennies and garden eels. During the safety stop divers may be surrounded by 100+ horse-eye jacks that school under the yacht.

Austin Smith Wreck: A 90' Bahamian Defense Force cutter lying in 60’ of water that, ironically, sank in 1995 while being towed to San Salvador to be sunk there as a dive site.

Barracuda Shoals: This bankside patch reef has huge schools of fish as well as many small critters on the reef and surrounding sand.

Blacktip Wall: Hammerhead sharks have been sighted frequently on this wall. This reef is also where Ned Deloach (the popular Reef Identification books co-author) discovered the rare Lemon goby.

Cathedral: This site is part of the Dog Rocks Reef. This reef starts at 35' and slopes off to 50' before dropping straight down into the Exuma Sound. The “cathedral” is a large swim-through where light filters down from above reflecting off thousands of silversides. This swim-through also has many groupers and jacks that come to feed on the silversides. The wall has large stands of black coral and orange elephant ear and tube sponges. Pelagics such as eagle rays and sharks are frequently seen just off the wall.

Cracked Coral Head: This massive coral head rises 40' off the bottom. Several large swim-thruoughs make it look like it is cracked giving it the name.

Jeep Reef: This site named for a coral-encrusted jeep that sits near the mooring is in the middle of the Exumas Land & Sea Park and hosts a healthy population of fish. It is also one of the prettiest reefs you will ever see. Current that sweeps through this cut keeps the reef 's corals healthy.

Pillar Wall: One of many excellent wall dives. It starts at 30' and slopes to 50' before dropping 5,000' to the bottom. There are many caves and crevices. There is also a large colony of yellowhead jawfish in the rubble inside the reef.


Southwest Eleuthera

Cave Rock: A large coral mound in 50' of water surrounded by several smaller coral heads. There are several caves where you can swim from one side to the other. The large variety of corals and fish will amaze you. Hammerhead sharks have been seen here frequently.

Monolith: Large mounds of coral rise out of the sand at the edge of the wall. They start at 100' depth and rise to 55'. There is a colony of garden eels in the sand next to the mounds.
 

Little San Sal (Half Moon Cay)

Cave Reef: This 40' shallow patch reef has several large swim-throughs cutting in the middle of the reef.

Empress Pinnacles: This wall dive features 30' high pinnacles coming out of the sand at the edge of the wall. Pelagic animals are seen frequently in the clear water off the wall. There are large branches of black coral growing on the sides of the pinnacles.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
08 Feb 2025
8D/7N
[Nassau-Nassau] Exuma Cays and Southwest Eleuthera [08 Feb 25 - 15 Feb 25]
Exuma Cays The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over ...
See Itinerary

Exuma Cays

The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over 120 miles from just south of new Providence to the anchor islands of Great and Little Exuma to the south. The Exuma Cays are a part of the more remote Out Islands of the Bahamas. The Cays are the most exotic of these islands, a collection of sandy jewels set in the aquamarine and sapphire of some of the most beautiful waters in the world along with an intriguing combination of walls and rich shallow reefs.

Nassau

Lost Blue Hole: The rim of this large blue hole lies in 40' of water surrounded by coral heads, stingrays, and many schools of fish. There is a lobster filled crevice at 80'. In the sand surrounding the hole, divers find many small fish such as banded jawfish, Seminole gobies, and tobacco fish. There are usually one or two nurse sharks and during the spring a large school of blacknose sharks inhabits the bottom of the 200' hole.

Periwinkle Reef: This is a shallow patch-reef teaming with fish. The local Nassau tour operators feed fish here, so sergeant majors and angelfish approach scuba divers looking for a handout.

 

Exumas

Amberjack Reef: This 50' patch-reef that has prolific fish life including reef sharks and up to ten large groupers. This dive also has many interesting small critters such as pirate blennies and garden eels. During the safety stop divers may be surrounded by 100+ horse-eye jacks that school under the yacht.

Austin Smith Wreck: A 90' Bahamian Defense Force cutter lying in 60’ of water that, ironically, sank in 1995 while being towed to San Salvador to be sunk there as a dive site.

Barracuda Shoals: This bankside patch reef has huge schools of fish as well as many small critters on the reef and surrounding sand.

Blacktip Wall: Hammerhead sharks have been sighted frequently on this wall. This reef is also where Ned Deloach (the popular Reef Identification books co-author) discovered the rare Lemon goby.

Cathedral: This site is part of the Dog Rocks Reef. This reef starts at 35' and slopes off to 50' before dropping straight down into the Exuma Sound. The “cathedral” is a large swim-through where light filters down from above reflecting off thousands of silversides. This swim-through also has many groupers and jacks that come to feed on the silversides. The wall has large stands of black coral and orange elephant ear and tube sponges. Pelagics such as eagle rays and sharks are frequently seen just off the wall.

Cracked Coral Head: This massive coral head rises 40' off the bottom. Several large swim-thruoughs make it look like it is cracked giving it the name.

Jeep Reef: This site named for a coral-encrusted jeep that sits near the mooring is in the middle of the Exumas Land & Sea Park and hosts a healthy population of fish. It is also one of the prettiest reefs you will ever see. Current that sweeps through this cut keeps the reef 's corals healthy.

Pillar Wall: One of many excellent wall dives. It starts at 30' and slopes to 50' before dropping 5,000' to the bottom. There are many caves and crevices. There is also a large colony of yellowhead jawfish in the rubble inside the reef.


Southwest Eleuthera

Cave Rock: A large coral mound in 50' of water surrounded by several smaller coral heads. There are several caves where you can swim from one side to the other. The large variety of corals and fish will amaze you. Hammerhead sharks have been seen here frequently.

Monolith: Large mounds of coral rise out of the sand at the edge of the wall. They start at 100' depth and rise to 55'. There is a colony of garden eels in the sand next to the mounds.
 

Little San Sal (Half Moon Cay)

Cave Reef: This 40' shallow patch reef has several large swim-throughs cutting in the middle of the reef.

Empress Pinnacles: This wall dive features 30' high pinnacles coming out of the sand at the edge of the wall. Pelagic animals are seen frequently in the clear water off the wall. There are large branches of black coral growing on the sides of the pinnacles.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
15 Feb 2025
8D/7N
[Nassau-Nassau] Exuma Cays and Southwest Eleuthera [15 Feb 25 - 22 Feb 25]
Exuma Cays The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over ...
See Itinerary

Exuma Cays

The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over 120 miles from just south of new Providence to the anchor islands of Great and Little Exuma to the south. The Exuma Cays are a part of the more remote Out Islands of the Bahamas. The Cays are the most exotic of these islands, a collection of sandy jewels set in the aquamarine and sapphire of some of the most beautiful waters in the world along with an intriguing combination of walls and rich shallow reefs.

Nassau

Lost Blue Hole: The rim of this large blue hole lies in 40' of water surrounded by coral heads, stingrays, and many schools of fish. There is a lobster filled crevice at 80'. In the sand surrounding the hole, divers find many small fish such as banded jawfish, Seminole gobies, and tobacco fish. There are usually one or two nurse sharks and during the spring a large school of blacknose sharks inhabits the bottom of the 200' hole.

Periwinkle Reef: This is a shallow patch-reef teaming with fish. The local Nassau tour operators feed fish here, so sergeant majors and angelfish approach scuba divers looking for a handout.

 

Exumas

Amberjack Reef: This 50' patch-reef that has prolific fish life including reef sharks and up to ten large groupers. This dive also has many interesting small critters such as pirate blennies and garden eels. During the safety stop divers may be surrounded by 100+ horse-eye jacks that school under the yacht.

Austin Smith Wreck: A 90' Bahamian Defense Force cutter lying in 60’ of water that, ironically, sank in 1995 while being towed to San Salvador to be sunk there as a dive site.

Barracuda Shoals: This bankside patch reef has huge schools of fish as well as many small critters on the reef and surrounding sand.

Blacktip Wall: Hammerhead sharks have been sighted frequently on this wall. This reef is also where Ned Deloach (the popular Reef Identification books co-author) discovered the rare Lemon goby.

Cathedral: This site is part of the Dog Rocks Reef. This reef starts at 35' and slopes off to 50' before dropping straight down into the Exuma Sound. The “cathedral” is a large swim-through where light filters down from above reflecting off thousands of silversides. This swim-through also has many groupers and jacks that come to feed on the silversides. The wall has large stands of black coral and orange elephant ear and tube sponges. Pelagics such as eagle rays and sharks are frequently seen just off the wall.

Cracked Coral Head: This massive coral head rises 40' off the bottom. Several large swim-thruoughs make it look like it is cracked giving it the name.

Jeep Reef: This site named for a coral-encrusted jeep that sits near the mooring is in the middle of the Exumas Land & Sea Park and hosts a healthy population of fish. It is also one of the prettiest reefs you will ever see. Current that sweeps through this cut keeps the reef 's corals healthy.

Pillar Wall: One of many excellent wall dives. It starts at 30' and slopes to 50' before dropping 5,000' to the bottom. There are many caves and crevices. There is also a large colony of yellowhead jawfish in the rubble inside the reef.


Southwest Eleuthera

Cave Rock: A large coral mound in 50' of water surrounded by several smaller coral heads. There are several caves where you can swim from one side to the other. The large variety of corals and fish will amaze you. Hammerhead sharks have been seen here frequently.

Monolith: Large mounds of coral rise out of the sand at the edge of the wall. They start at 100' depth and rise to 55'. There is a colony of garden eels in the sand next to the mounds.
 

Little San Sal (Half Moon Cay)

Cave Reef: This 40' shallow patch reef has several large swim-throughs cutting in the middle of the reef.

Empress Pinnacles: This wall dive features 30' high pinnacles coming out of the sand at the edge of the wall. Pelagic animals are seen frequently in the clear water off the wall. There are large branches of black coral growing on the sides of the pinnacles.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
22 Feb 2025
8D/7N
[Nassau-Nassau] Exuma Cays and Southwest Eleuthera [22 Feb 25 - 01 Mar 25]
Exuma Cays The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over ...
See Itinerary

Exuma Cays

The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over 120 miles from just south of new Providence to the anchor islands of Great and Little Exuma to the south. The Exuma Cays are a part of the more remote Out Islands of the Bahamas. The Cays are the most exotic of these islands, a collection of sandy jewels set in the aquamarine and sapphire of some of the most beautiful waters in the world along with an intriguing combination of walls and rich shallow reefs.

Nassau

Lost Blue Hole: The rim of this large blue hole lies in 40' of water surrounded by coral heads, stingrays, and many schools of fish. There is a lobster filled crevice at 80'. In the sand surrounding the hole, divers find many small fish such as banded jawfish, Seminole gobies, and tobacco fish. There are usually one or two nurse sharks and during the spring a large school of blacknose sharks inhabits the bottom of the 200' hole.

Periwinkle Reef: This is a shallow patch-reef teaming with fish. The local Nassau tour operators feed fish here, so sergeant majors and angelfish approach scuba divers looking for a handout.

 

Exumas

Amberjack Reef: This 50' patch-reef that has prolific fish life including reef sharks and up to ten large groupers. This dive also has many interesting small critters such as pirate blennies and garden eels. During the safety stop divers may be surrounded by 100+ horse-eye jacks that school under the yacht.

Austin Smith Wreck: A 90' Bahamian Defense Force cutter lying in 60’ of water that, ironically, sank in 1995 while being towed to San Salvador to be sunk there as a dive site.

Barracuda Shoals: This bankside patch reef has huge schools of fish as well as many small critters on the reef and surrounding sand.

Blacktip Wall: Hammerhead sharks have been sighted frequently on this wall. This reef is also where Ned Deloach (the popular Reef Identification books co-author) discovered the rare Lemon goby.

Cathedral: This site is part of the Dog Rocks Reef. This reef starts at 35' and slopes off to 50' before dropping straight down into the Exuma Sound. The “cathedral” is a large swim-through where light filters down from above reflecting off thousands of silversides. This swim-through also has many groupers and jacks that come to feed on the silversides. The wall has large stands of black coral and orange elephant ear and tube sponges. Pelagics such as eagle rays and sharks are frequently seen just off the wall.

Cracked Coral Head: This massive coral head rises 40' off the bottom. Several large swim-thruoughs make it look like it is cracked giving it the name.

Jeep Reef: This site named for a coral-encrusted jeep that sits near the mooring is in the middle of the Exumas Land & Sea Park and hosts a healthy population of fish. It is also one of the prettiest reefs you will ever see. Current that sweeps through this cut keeps the reef 's corals healthy.

Pillar Wall: One of many excellent wall dives. It starts at 30' and slopes to 50' before dropping 5,000' to the bottom. There are many caves and crevices. There is also a large colony of yellowhead jawfish in the rubble inside the reef.


Southwest Eleuthera

Cave Rock: A large coral mound in 50' of water surrounded by several smaller coral heads. There are several caves where you can swim from one side to the other. The large variety of corals and fish will amaze you. Hammerhead sharks have been seen here frequently.

Monolith: Large mounds of coral rise out of the sand at the edge of the wall. They start at 100' depth and rise to 55'. There is a colony of garden eels in the sand next to the mounds.
 

Little San Sal (Half Moon Cay)

Cave Reef: This 40' shallow patch reef has several large swim-throughs cutting in the middle of the reef.

Empress Pinnacles: This wall dive features 30' high pinnacles coming out of the sand at the edge of the wall. Pelagic animals are seen frequently in the clear water off the wall. There are large branches of black coral growing on the sides of the pinnacles.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
01 Mar 2025
8D/7N
[Nassau-Nassau] Exuma Cays and Southwest Eleuthera [01 Mar 25 - 08 Mar 25]
Exuma Cays The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over ...
See Itinerary

Exuma Cays

The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over 120 miles from just south of new Providence to the anchor islands of Great and Little Exuma to the south. The Exuma Cays are a part of the more remote Out Islands of the Bahamas. The Cays are the most exotic of these islands, a collection of sandy jewels set in the aquamarine and sapphire of some of the most beautiful waters in the world along with an intriguing combination of walls and rich shallow reefs.

Nassau

Lost Blue Hole: The rim of this large blue hole lies in 40' of water surrounded by coral heads, stingrays, and many schools of fish. There is a lobster filled crevice at 80'. In the sand surrounding the hole, divers find many small fish such as banded jawfish, Seminole gobies, and tobacco fish. There are usually one or two nurse sharks and during the spring a large school of blacknose sharks inhabits the bottom of the 200' hole.

Periwinkle Reef: This is a shallow patch-reef teaming with fish. The local Nassau tour operators feed fish here, so sergeant majors and angelfish approach scuba divers looking for a handout.

 

Exumas

Amberjack Reef: This 50' patch-reef that has prolific fish life including reef sharks and up to ten large groupers. This dive also has many interesting small critters such as pirate blennies and garden eels. During the safety stop divers may be surrounded by 100+ horse-eye jacks that school under the yacht.

Austin Smith Wreck: A 90' Bahamian Defense Force cutter lying in 60’ of water that, ironically, sank in 1995 while being towed to San Salvador to be sunk there as a dive site.

Barracuda Shoals: This bankside patch reef has huge schools of fish as well as many small critters on the reef and surrounding sand.

Blacktip Wall: Hammerhead sharks have been sighted frequently on this wall. This reef is also where Ned Deloach (the popular Reef Identification books co-author) discovered the rare Lemon goby.

Cathedral: This site is part of the Dog Rocks Reef. This reef starts at 35' and slopes off to 50' before dropping straight down into the Exuma Sound. The “cathedral” is a large swim-through where light filters down from above reflecting off thousands of silversides. This swim-through also has many groupers and jacks that come to feed on the silversides. The wall has large stands of black coral and orange elephant ear and tube sponges. Pelagics such as eagle rays and sharks are frequently seen just off the wall.

Cracked Coral Head: This massive coral head rises 40' off the bottom. Several large swim-thruoughs make it look like it is cracked giving it the name.

Jeep Reef: This site named for a coral-encrusted jeep that sits near the mooring is in the middle of the Exumas Land & Sea Park and hosts a healthy population of fish. It is also one of the prettiest reefs you will ever see. Current that sweeps through this cut keeps the reef 's corals healthy.

Pillar Wall: One of many excellent wall dives. It starts at 30' and slopes to 50' before dropping 5,000' to the bottom. There are many caves and crevices. There is also a large colony of yellowhead jawfish in the rubble inside the reef.


Southwest Eleuthera

Cave Rock: A large coral mound in 50' of water surrounded by several smaller coral heads. There are several caves where you can swim from one side to the other. The large variety of corals and fish will amaze you. Hammerhead sharks have been seen here frequently.

Monolith: Large mounds of coral rise out of the sand at the edge of the wall. They start at 100' depth and rise to 55'. There is a colony of garden eels in the sand next to the mounds.
 

Little San Sal (Half Moon Cay)

Cave Reef: This 40' shallow patch reef has several large swim-throughs cutting in the middle of the reef.

Empress Pinnacles: This wall dive features 30' high pinnacles coming out of the sand at the edge of the wall. Pelagic animals are seen frequently in the clear water off the wall. There are large branches of black coral growing on the sides of the pinnacles.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
08 Mar 2025
8D/7N
[Nassau-Nassau] Exuma Cays and Southwest Eleuthera [08 Mar 25 - 15 Mar 25]
Exuma Cays The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over ...
See Itinerary

Exuma Cays

The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over 120 miles from just south of new Providence to the anchor islands of Great and Little Exuma to the south. The Exuma Cays are a part of the more remote Out Islands of the Bahamas. The Cays are the most exotic of these islands, a collection of sandy jewels set in the aquamarine and sapphire of some of the most beautiful waters in the world along with an intriguing combination of walls and rich shallow reefs.

Nassau

Lost Blue Hole: The rim of this large blue hole lies in 40' of water surrounded by coral heads, stingrays, and many schools of fish. There is a lobster filled crevice at 80'. In the sand surrounding the hole, divers find many small fish such as banded jawfish, Seminole gobies, and tobacco fish. There are usually one or two nurse sharks and during the spring a large school of blacknose sharks inhabits the bottom of the 200' hole.

Periwinkle Reef: This is a shallow patch-reef teaming with fish. The local Nassau tour operators feed fish here, so sergeant majors and angelfish approach scuba divers looking for a handout.

 

Exumas

Amberjack Reef: This 50' patch-reef that has prolific fish life including reef sharks and up to ten large groupers. This dive also has many interesting small critters such as pirate blennies and garden eels. During the safety stop divers may be surrounded by 100+ horse-eye jacks that school under the yacht.

Austin Smith Wreck: A 90' Bahamian Defense Force cutter lying in 60’ of water that, ironically, sank in 1995 while being towed to San Salvador to be sunk there as a dive site.

Barracuda Shoals: This bankside patch reef has huge schools of fish as well as many small critters on the reef and surrounding sand.

Blacktip Wall: Hammerhead sharks have been sighted frequently on this wall. This reef is also where Ned Deloach (the popular Reef Identification books co-author) discovered the rare Lemon goby.

Cathedral: This site is part of the Dog Rocks Reef. This reef starts at 35' and slopes off to 50' before dropping straight down into the Exuma Sound. The “cathedral” is a large swim-through where light filters down from above reflecting off thousands of silversides. This swim-through also has many groupers and jacks that come to feed on the silversides. The wall has large stands of black coral and orange elephant ear and tube sponges. Pelagics such as eagle rays and sharks are frequently seen just off the wall.

Cracked Coral Head: This massive coral head rises 40' off the bottom. Several large swim-thruoughs make it look like it is cracked giving it the name.

Jeep Reef: This site named for a coral-encrusted jeep that sits near the mooring is in the middle of the Exumas Land & Sea Park and hosts a healthy population of fish. It is also one of the prettiest reefs you will ever see. Current that sweeps through this cut keeps the reef 's corals healthy.

Pillar Wall: One of many excellent wall dives. It starts at 30' and slopes to 50' before dropping 5,000' to the bottom. There are many caves and crevices. There is also a large colony of yellowhead jawfish in the rubble inside the reef.


Southwest Eleuthera

Cave Rock: A large coral mound in 50' of water surrounded by several smaller coral heads. There are several caves where you can swim from one side to the other. The large variety of corals and fish will amaze you. Hammerhead sharks have been seen here frequently.

Monolith: Large mounds of coral rise out of the sand at the edge of the wall. They start at 100' depth and rise to 55'. There is a colony of garden eels in the sand next to the mounds.
 

Little San Sal (Half Moon Cay)

Cave Reef: This 40' shallow patch reef has several large swim-throughs cutting in the middle of the reef.

Empress Pinnacles: This wall dive features 30' high pinnacles coming out of the sand at the edge of the wall. Pelagic animals are seen frequently in the clear water off the wall. There are large branches of black coral growing on the sides of the pinnacles.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
15 Mar 2025
8D/7N
[Nassau-Nassau] Exuma Cays and Southwest Eleuthera [15 Mar 25 - 22 Mar 25]
Exuma Cays The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over ...
See Itinerary

Exuma Cays

The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over 120 miles from just south of new Providence to the anchor islands of Great and Little Exuma to the south. The Exuma Cays are a part of the more remote Out Islands of the Bahamas. The Cays are the most exotic of these islands, a collection of sandy jewels set in the aquamarine and sapphire of some of the most beautiful waters in the world along with an intriguing combination of walls and rich shallow reefs.

Nassau

Lost Blue Hole: The rim of this large blue hole lies in 40' of water surrounded by coral heads, stingrays, and many schools of fish. There is a lobster filled crevice at 80'. In the sand surrounding the hole, divers find many small fish such as banded jawfish, Seminole gobies, and tobacco fish. There are usually one or two nurse sharks and during the spring a large school of blacknose sharks inhabits the bottom of the 200' hole.

Periwinkle Reef: This is a shallow patch-reef teaming with fish. The local Nassau tour operators feed fish here, so sergeant majors and angelfish approach scuba divers looking for a handout.

 

Exumas

Amberjack Reef: This 50' patch-reef that has prolific fish life including reef sharks and up to ten large groupers. This dive also has many interesting small critters such as pirate blennies and garden eels. During the safety stop divers may be surrounded by 100+ horse-eye jacks that school under the yacht.

Austin Smith Wreck: A 90' Bahamian Defense Force cutter lying in 60’ of water that, ironically, sank in 1995 while being towed to San Salvador to be sunk there as a dive site.

Barracuda Shoals: This bankside patch reef has huge schools of fish as well as many small critters on the reef and surrounding sand.

Blacktip Wall: Hammerhead sharks have been sighted frequently on this wall. This reef is also where Ned Deloach (the popular Reef Identification books co-author) discovered the rare Lemon goby.

Cathedral: This site is part of the Dog Rocks Reef. This reef starts at 35' and slopes off to 50' before dropping straight down into the Exuma Sound. The “cathedral” is a large swim-through where light filters down from above reflecting off thousands of silversides. This swim-through also has many groupers and jacks that come to feed on the silversides. The wall has large stands of black coral and orange elephant ear and tube sponges. Pelagics such as eagle rays and sharks are frequently seen just off the wall.

Cracked Coral Head: This massive coral head rises 40' off the bottom. Several large swim-thruoughs make it look like it is cracked giving it the name.

Jeep Reef: This site named for a coral-encrusted jeep that sits near the mooring is in the middle of the Exumas Land & Sea Park and hosts a healthy population of fish. It is also one of the prettiest reefs you will ever see. Current that sweeps through this cut keeps the reef 's corals healthy.

Pillar Wall: One of many excellent wall dives. It starts at 30' and slopes to 50' before dropping 5,000' to the bottom. There are many caves and crevices. There is also a large colony of yellowhead jawfish in the rubble inside the reef.


Southwest Eleuthera

Cave Rock: A large coral mound in 50' of water surrounded by several smaller coral heads. There are several caves where you can swim from one side to the other. The large variety of corals and fish will amaze you. Hammerhead sharks have been seen here frequently.

Monolith: Large mounds of coral rise out of the sand at the edge of the wall. They start at 100' depth and rise to 55'. There is a colony of garden eels in the sand next to the mounds.
 

Little San Sal (Half Moon Cay)

Cave Reef: This 40' shallow patch reef has several large swim-throughs cutting in the middle of the reef.

Empress Pinnacles: This wall dive features 30' high pinnacles coming out of the sand at the edge of the wall. Pelagic animals are seen frequently in the clear water off the wall. There are large branches of black coral growing on the sides of the pinnacles.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
22 Mar 2025
8D/7N
[Nassau-Nassau] Exuma Cays and Southwest Eleuthera [22 Mar 25 - 29 Mar 25]
Exuma Cays The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over ...
See Itinerary

Exuma Cays

The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over 120 miles from just south of new Providence to the anchor islands of Great and Little Exuma to the south. The Exuma Cays are a part of the more remote Out Islands of the Bahamas. The Cays are the most exotic of these islands, a collection of sandy jewels set in the aquamarine and sapphire of some of the most beautiful waters in the world along with an intriguing combination of walls and rich shallow reefs.

Nassau

Lost Blue Hole: The rim of this large blue hole lies in 40' of water surrounded by coral heads, stingrays, and many schools of fish. There is a lobster filled crevice at 80'. In the sand surrounding the hole, divers find many small fish such as banded jawfish, Seminole gobies, and tobacco fish. There are usually one or two nurse sharks and during the spring a large school of blacknose sharks inhabits the bottom of the 200' hole.

Periwinkle Reef: This is a shallow patch-reef teaming with fish. The local Nassau tour operators feed fish here, so sergeant majors and angelfish approach scuba divers looking for a handout.

 

Exumas

Amberjack Reef: This 50' patch-reef that has prolific fish life including reef sharks and up to ten large groupers. This dive also has many interesting small critters such as pirate blennies and garden eels. During the safety stop divers may be surrounded by 100+ horse-eye jacks that school under the yacht.

Austin Smith Wreck: A 90' Bahamian Defense Force cutter lying in 60’ of water that, ironically, sank in 1995 while being towed to San Salvador to be sunk there as a dive site.

Barracuda Shoals: This bankside patch reef has huge schools of fish as well as many small critters on the reef and surrounding sand.

Blacktip Wall: Hammerhead sharks have been sighted frequently on this wall. This reef is also where Ned Deloach (the popular Reef Identification books co-author) discovered the rare Lemon goby.

Cathedral: This site is part of the Dog Rocks Reef. This reef starts at 35' and slopes off to 50' before dropping straight down into the Exuma Sound. The “cathedral” is a large swim-through where light filters down from above reflecting off thousands of silversides. This swim-through also has many groupers and jacks that come to feed on the silversides. The wall has large stands of black coral and orange elephant ear and tube sponges. Pelagics such as eagle rays and sharks are frequently seen just off the wall.

Cracked Coral Head: This massive coral head rises 40' off the bottom. Several large swim-thruoughs make it look like it is cracked giving it the name.

Jeep Reef: This site named for a coral-encrusted jeep that sits near the mooring is in the middle of the Exumas Land & Sea Park and hosts a healthy population of fish. It is also one of the prettiest reefs you will ever see. Current that sweeps through this cut keeps the reef 's corals healthy.

Pillar Wall: One of many excellent wall dives. It starts at 30' and slopes to 50' before dropping 5,000' to the bottom. There are many caves and crevices. There is also a large colony of yellowhead jawfish in the rubble inside the reef.


Southwest Eleuthera

Cave Rock: A large coral mound in 50' of water surrounded by several smaller coral heads. There are several caves where you can swim from one side to the other. The large variety of corals and fish will amaze you. Hammerhead sharks have been seen here frequently.

Monolith: Large mounds of coral rise out of the sand at the edge of the wall. They start at 100' depth and rise to 55'. There is a colony of garden eels in the sand next to the mounds.
 

Little San Sal (Half Moon Cay)

Cave Reef: This 40' shallow patch reef has several large swim-throughs cutting in the middle of the reef.

Empress Pinnacles: This wall dive features 30' high pinnacles coming out of the sand at the edge of the wall. Pelagic animals are seen frequently in the clear water off the wall. There are large branches of black coral growing on the sides of the pinnacles.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
05 Apr 2025
8D/7N
[Freeport-Freeport] Grand Bahama West End with Tiger Beach [05 Apr 25 - 12 Apr 25]
Tiger Beach Mount Olympus: The top of the reef is 45-50 feet, down one side you reach the sand ar...
See Itinerary

Tiger Beach

Mount Olympus: The top of the reef is 45-50 feet, down one side you reach the sand around 95 feet, down the other side it just keep going creating a wonderful wall. Guests could spend all day diving this area and never cover all of Mount Olympus.

Mini Wall: This dive site has two mounds running side by side with a small patch of white sand between these mounds covered with marine life. The first of the coral mounds starts around 35 feet and slopes down to around 70 feet. The second mound starts around 40 feet and slopes to about 85 feet. Both mounds as they slope give the look of a small wall.

Hog Fish: A shallow dive ranging from 30-45 feet. As you swim along Hogfish Reef you will notice lots of crevices and ledges to look under for small creatures. A garden of soft corals with hard corals covers the top and schools of Grunts, Snappers, Chromis and Angelfish cover the reef. Swimming in the sandy areas just off the reef are large and small Hogfish.

Shark Paradise: This beautiful reef received its name from the different types of sharks you can find here at any given time. While enjoying the marine life covering Shark Paradise we have seen, Nurse, Caribbean and Lemon Sharks. Once in a while we even get a beautiful Tiger Shark in the area.

Fishtail: Is located just to the south of Shark Paradise. Due to its location we sometimes get a chance to see a shark while diving the beautiful reef which is covered with Gorgonians, Yellow Sea Whips, Sea Plumes, Orange Spiny Sea Rods and Sea Fans. When you can add a mix of hard corals and a variety of lots of tropical fish you have the perfect spot to enjoy.

Sugar Wreck: This is one of the crew members favorite shallow sites. During the late 1800's a barge carrying molasses sank in 18-20 feet of water in the middle of nowhere on the Little Bahama Bank. Soon fish and other marine life found this to be a great hiding place and soon the wreck was covered with marine life. At any given time we can find the resident Green Moray Eel, or Nurse Shark and everyone's favorite, the Hawksbill Turtle that comes up close for pictures and video.

El Dorado: Starting in 40 feet and sloping towards a sandy bottom around 70 feet, guests will enjoy seeing Lobsters, huge Channel Clinging Crabs, Banded Coral Shrimp and schools of fish. At night Octopus, Squid, Turtles resting, Eels swimming out in the open and an array of hard and soft Corals are seen.

El Captainan: A huge underwater mound that is covered with Gorgonians and hard corals. Just off to the side are two large pinnacles. The top of the main mound starts around 45-50 feet and the bottom 90 feet. You can easily follow schools of fish or stay in one small area and look for lots of macro and small animal life.

Tiger Beach: A beautiful beach area that sits in 15 feet of water. There’s a white sandy bottom that seems to always have Sharks. Most of the Sharks seen are Lemon Sharks ranging from 4-7 feet in length. Also seen are Caribbean Reef Sharks, Nurse Sharks and Tiger Sharks.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
12 Apr 2025
8D/7N
[Freeport-Freeport] Grand Bahama West End with Tiger Beach [12 Apr 25 - 19 Apr 25]
Tiger Beach Mount Olympus: The top of the reef is 45-50 feet, down one side you reach the sand ar...
See Itinerary

Tiger Beach

Mount Olympus: The top of the reef is 45-50 feet, down one side you reach the sand around 95 feet, down the other side it just keep going creating a wonderful wall. Guests could spend all day diving this area and never cover all of Mount Olympus.

Mini Wall: This dive site has two mounds running side by side with a small patch of white sand between these mounds covered with marine life. The first of the coral mounds starts around 35 feet and slopes down to around 70 feet. The second mound starts around 40 feet and slopes to about 85 feet. Both mounds as they slope give the look of a small wall.

Hog Fish: A shallow dive ranging from 30-45 feet. As you swim along Hogfish Reef you will notice lots of crevices and ledges to look under for small creatures. A garden of soft corals with hard corals covers the top and schools of Grunts, Snappers, Chromis and Angelfish cover the reef. Swimming in the sandy areas just off the reef are large and small Hogfish.

Shark Paradise: This beautiful reef received its name from the different types of sharks you can find here at any given time. While enjoying the marine life covering Shark Paradise we have seen, Nurse, Caribbean and Lemon Sharks. Once in a while we even get a beautiful Tiger Shark in the area.

Fishtail: Is located just to the south of Shark Paradise. Due to its location we sometimes get a chance to see a shark while diving the beautiful reef which is covered with Gorgonians, Yellow Sea Whips, Sea Plumes, Orange Spiny Sea Rods and Sea Fans. When you can add a mix of hard corals and a variety of lots of tropical fish you have the perfect spot to enjoy.

Sugar Wreck: This is one of the crew members favorite shallow sites. During the late 1800's a barge carrying molasses sank in 18-20 feet of water in the middle of nowhere on the Little Bahama Bank. Soon fish and other marine life found this to be a great hiding place and soon the wreck was covered with marine life. At any given time we can find the resident Green Moray Eel, or Nurse Shark and everyone's favorite, the Hawksbill Turtle that comes up close for pictures and video.

El Dorado: Starting in 40 feet and sloping towards a sandy bottom around 70 feet, guests will enjoy seeing Lobsters, huge Channel Clinging Crabs, Banded Coral Shrimp and schools of fish. At night Octopus, Squid, Turtles resting, Eels swimming out in the open and an array of hard and soft Corals are seen.

El Captainan: A huge underwater mound that is covered with Gorgonians and hard corals. Just off to the side are two large pinnacles. The top of the main mound starts around 45-50 feet and the bottom 90 feet. You can easily follow schools of fish or stay in one small area and look for lots of macro and small animal life.

Tiger Beach: A beautiful beach area that sits in 15 feet of water. There’s a white sandy bottom that seems to always have Sharks. Most of the Sharks seen are Lemon Sharks ranging from 4-7 feet in length. Also seen are Caribbean Reef Sharks, Nurse Sharks and Tiger Sharks.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
19 Apr 2025
8D/7N
[Freeport-Freeport] Grand Bahama West End with Tiger Beach [19 Apr 25 - 26 Apr 25]
Tiger Beach Mount Olympus: The top of the reef is 45-50 feet, down one side you reach the sand ar...
See Itinerary

Tiger Beach

Mount Olympus: The top of the reef is 45-50 feet, down one side you reach the sand around 95 feet, down the other side it just keep going creating a wonderful wall. Guests could spend all day diving this area and never cover all of Mount Olympus.

Mini Wall: This dive site has two mounds running side by side with a small patch of white sand between these mounds covered with marine life. The first of the coral mounds starts around 35 feet and slopes down to around 70 feet. The second mound starts around 40 feet and slopes to about 85 feet. Both mounds as they slope give the look of a small wall.

Hog Fish: A shallow dive ranging from 30-45 feet. As you swim along Hogfish Reef you will notice lots of crevices and ledges to look under for small creatures. A garden of soft corals with hard corals covers the top and schools of Grunts, Snappers, Chromis and Angelfish cover the reef. Swimming in the sandy areas just off the reef are large and small Hogfish.

Shark Paradise: This beautiful reef received its name from the different types of sharks you can find here at any given time. While enjoying the marine life covering Shark Paradise we have seen, Nurse, Caribbean and Lemon Sharks. Once in a while we even get a beautiful Tiger Shark in the area.

Fishtail: Is located just to the south of Shark Paradise. Due to its location we sometimes get a chance to see a shark while diving the beautiful reef which is covered with Gorgonians, Yellow Sea Whips, Sea Plumes, Orange Spiny Sea Rods and Sea Fans. When you can add a mix of hard corals and a variety of lots of tropical fish you have the perfect spot to enjoy.

Sugar Wreck: This is one of the crew members favorite shallow sites. During the late 1800's a barge carrying molasses sank in 18-20 feet of water in the middle of nowhere on the Little Bahama Bank. Soon fish and other marine life found this to be a great hiding place and soon the wreck was covered with marine life. At any given time we can find the resident Green Moray Eel, or Nurse Shark and everyone's favorite, the Hawksbill Turtle that comes up close for pictures and video.

El Dorado: Starting in 40 feet and sloping towards a sandy bottom around 70 feet, guests will enjoy seeing Lobsters, huge Channel Clinging Crabs, Banded Coral Shrimp and schools of fish. At night Octopus, Squid, Turtles resting, Eels swimming out in the open and an array of hard and soft Corals are seen.

El Captainan: A huge underwater mound that is covered with Gorgonians and hard corals. Just off to the side are two large pinnacles. The top of the main mound starts around 45-50 feet and the bottom 90 feet. You can easily follow schools of fish or stay in one small area and look for lots of macro and small animal life.

Tiger Beach: A beautiful beach area that sits in 15 feet of water. There’s a white sandy bottom that seems to always have Sharks. Most of the Sharks seen are Lemon Sharks ranging from 4-7 feet in length. Also seen are Caribbean Reef Sharks, Nurse Sharks and Tiger Sharks.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
26 Apr 2025
8D/7N
[Freeport-Freeport] Grand Bahama West End with Tiger Beach [26 Apr 25 - 03 May 25]
Tiger Beach Mount Olympus: The top of the reef is 45-50 feet, down one side you reach the sand ar...
See Itinerary

Tiger Beach

Mount Olympus: The top of the reef is 45-50 feet, down one side you reach the sand around 95 feet, down the other side it just keep going creating a wonderful wall. Guests could spend all day diving this area and never cover all of Mount Olympus.

Mini Wall: This dive site has two mounds running side by side with a small patch of white sand between these mounds covered with marine life. The first of the coral mounds starts around 35 feet and slopes down to around 70 feet. The second mound starts around 40 feet and slopes to about 85 feet. Both mounds as they slope give the look of a small wall.

Hog Fish: A shallow dive ranging from 30-45 feet. As you swim along Hogfish Reef you will notice lots of crevices and ledges to look under for small creatures. A garden of soft corals with hard corals covers the top and schools of Grunts, Snappers, Chromis and Angelfish cover the reef. Swimming in the sandy areas just off the reef are large and small Hogfish.

Shark Paradise: This beautiful reef received its name from the different types of sharks you can find here at any given time. While enjoying the marine life covering Shark Paradise we have seen, Nurse, Caribbean and Lemon Sharks. Once in a while we even get a beautiful Tiger Shark in the area.

Fishtail: Is located just to the south of Shark Paradise. Due to its location we sometimes get a chance to see a shark while diving the beautiful reef which is covered with Gorgonians, Yellow Sea Whips, Sea Plumes, Orange Spiny Sea Rods and Sea Fans. When you can add a mix of hard corals and a variety of lots of tropical fish you have the perfect spot to enjoy.

Sugar Wreck: This is one of the crew members favorite shallow sites. During the late 1800's a barge carrying molasses sank in 18-20 feet of water in the middle of nowhere on the Little Bahama Bank. Soon fish and other marine life found this to be a great hiding place and soon the wreck was covered with marine life. At any given time we can find the resident Green Moray Eel, or Nurse Shark and everyone's favorite, the Hawksbill Turtle that comes up close for pictures and video.

El Dorado: Starting in 40 feet and sloping towards a sandy bottom around 70 feet, guests will enjoy seeing Lobsters, huge Channel Clinging Crabs, Banded Coral Shrimp and schools of fish. At night Octopus, Squid, Turtles resting, Eels swimming out in the open and an array of hard and soft Corals are seen.

El Captainan: A huge underwater mound that is covered with Gorgonians and hard corals. Just off to the side are two large pinnacles. The top of the main mound starts around 45-50 feet and the bottom 90 feet. You can easily follow schools of fish or stay in one small area and look for lots of macro and small animal life.

Tiger Beach: A beautiful beach area that sits in 15 feet of water. There’s a white sandy bottom that seems to always have Sharks. Most of the Sharks seen are Lemon Sharks ranging from 4-7 feet in length. Also seen are Caribbean Reef Sharks, Nurse Sharks and Tiger Sharks.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
03 May 2025
8D/7N
[Freeport-Freeport] Grand Bahama West End with Tiger Beach [03 May 25 - 10 May 25]
Tiger Beach Mount Olympus: The top of the reef is 45-50 feet, down one side you reach the sand ar...
See Itinerary

Tiger Beach

Mount Olympus: The top of the reef is 45-50 feet, down one side you reach the sand around 95 feet, down the other side it just keep going creating a wonderful wall. Guests could spend all day diving this area and never cover all of Mount Olympus.

Mini Wall: This dive site has two mounds running side by side with a small patch of white sand between these mounds covered with marine life. The first of the coral mounds starts around 35 feet and slopes down to around 70 feet. The second mound starts around 40 feet and slopes to about 85 feet. Both mounds as they slope give the look of a small wall.

Hog Fish: A shallow dive ranging from 30-45 feet. As you swim along Hogfish Reef you will notice lots of crevices and ledges to look under for small creatures. A garden of soft corals with hard corals covers the top and schools of Grunts, Snappers, Chromis and Angelfish cover the reef. Swimming in the sandy areas just off the reef are large and small Hogfish.

Shark Paradise: This beautiful reef received its name from the different types of sharks you can find here at any given time. While enjoying the marine life covering Shark Paradise we have seen, Nurse, Caribbean and Lemon Sharks. Once in a while we even get a beautiful Tiger Shark in the area.

Fishtail: Is located just to the south of Shark Paradise. Due to its location we sometimes get a chance to see a shark while diving the beautiful reef which is covered with Gorgonians, Yellow Sea Whips, Sea Plumes, Orange Spiny Sea Rods and Sea Fans. When you can add a mix of hard corals and a variety of lots of tropical fish you have the perfect spot to enjoy.

Sugar Wreck: This is one of the crew members favorite shallow sites. During the late 1800's a barge carrying molasses sank in 18-20 feet of water in the middle of nowhere on the Little Bahama Bank. Soon fish and other marine life found this to be a great hiding place and soon the wreck was covered with marine life. At any given time we can find the resident Green Moray Eel, or Nurse Shark and everyone's favorite, the Hawksbill Turtle that comes up close for pictures and video.

El Dorado: Starting in 40 feet and sloping towards a sandy bottom around 70 feet, guests will enjoy seeing Lobsters, huge Channel Clinging Crabs, Banded Coral Shrimp and schools of fish. At night Octopus, Squid, Turtles resting, Eels swimming out in the open and an array of hard and soft Corals are seen.

El Captainan: A huge underwater mound that is covered with Gorgonians and hard corals. Just off to the side are two large pinnacles. The top of the main mound starts around 45-50 feet and the bottom 90 feet. You can easily follow schools of fish or stay in one small area and look for lots of macro and small animal life.

Tiger Beach: A beautiful beach area that sits in 15 feet of water. There’s a white sandy bottom that seems to always have Sharks. Most of the Sharks seen are Lemon Sharks ranging from 4-7 feet in length. Also seen are Caribbean Reef Sharks, Nurse Sharks and Tiger Sharks.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
10 May 2025
8D/7N
[Freeport-Freeport] Grand Bahama West End with Tiger Beach [10 May 25 - 17 May 25]
Tiger Beach Mount Olympus: The top of the reef is 45-50 feet, down one side you reach the sand ar...
See Itinerary

Tiger Beach

Mount Olympus: The top of the reef is 45-50 feet, down one side you reach the sand around 95 feet, down the other side it just keep going creating a wonderful wall. Guests could spend all day diving this area and never cover all of Mount Olympus.

Mini Wall: This dive site has two mounds running side by side with a small patch of white sand between these mounds covered with marine life. The first of the coral mounds starts around 35 feet and slopes down to around 70 feet. The second mound starts around 40 feet and slopes to about 85 feet. Both mounds as they slope give the look of a small wall.

Hog Fish: A shallow dive ranging from 30-45 feet. As you swim along Hogfish Reef you will notice lots of crevices and ledges to look under for small creatures. A garden of soft corals with hard corals covers the top and schools of Grunts, Snappers, Chromis and Angelfish cover the reef. Swimming in the sandy areas just off the reef are large and small Hogfish.

Shark Paradise: This beautiful reef received its name from the different types of sharks you can find here at any given time. While enjoying the marine life covering Shark Paradise we have seen, Nurse, Caribbean and Lemon Sharks. Once in a while we even get a beautiful Tiger Shark in the area.

Fishtail: Is located just to the south of Shark Paradise. Due to its location we sometimes get a chance to see a shark while diving the beautiful reef which is covered with Gorgonians, Yellow Sea Whips, Sea Plumes, Orange Spiny Sea Rods and Sea Fans. When you can add a mix of hard corals and a variety of lots of tropical fish you have the perfect spot to enjoy.

Sugar Wreck: This is one of the crew members favorite shallow sites. During the late 1800's a barge carrying molasses sank in 18-20 feet of water in the middle of nowhere on the Little Bahama Bank. Soon fish and other marine life found this to be a great hiding place and soon the wreck was covered with marine life. At any given time we can find the resident Green Moray Eel, or Nurse Shark and everyone's favorite, the Hawksbill Turtle that comes up close for pictures and video.

El Dorado: Starting in 40 feet and sloping towards a sandy bottom around 70 feet, guests will enjoy seeing Lobsters, huge Channel Clinging Crabs, Banded Coral Shrimp and schools of fish. At night Octopus, Squid, Turtles resting, Eels swimming out in the open and an array of hard and soft Corals are seen.

El Captainan: A huge underwater mound that is covered with Gorgonians and hard corals. Just off to the side are two large pinnacles. The top of the main mound starts around 45-50 feet and the bottom 90 feet. You can easily follow schools of fish or stay in one small area and look for lots of macro and small animal life.

Tiger Beach: A beautiful beach area that sits in 15 feet of water. There’s a white sandy bottom that seems to always have Sharks. Most of the Sharks seen are Lemon Sharks ranging from 4-7 feet in length. Also seen are Caribbean Reef Sharks, Nurse Sharks and Tiger Sharks.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
17 May 2025
8D/7N
[Freeport-Freeport] Grand Bahama West End with Tiger Beach [17 May 25 - 24 May 25]
Tiger Beach Mount Olympus: The top of the reef is 45-50 feet, down one side you reach the sand ar...
See Itinerary

Tiger Beach

Mount Olympus: The top of the reef is 45-50 feet, down one side you reach the sand around 95 feet, down the other side it just keep going creating a wonderful wall. Guests could spend all day diving this area and never cover all of Mount Olympus.

Mini Wall: This dive site has two mounds running side by side with a small patch of white sand between these mounds covered with marine life. The first of the coral mounds starts around 35 feet and slopes down to around 70 feet. The second mound starts around 40 feet and slopes to about 85 feet. Both mounds as they slope give the look of a small wall.

Hog Fish: A shallow dive ranging from 30-45 feet. As you swim along Hogfish Reef you will notice lots of crevices and ledges to look under for small creatures. A garden of soft corals with hard corals covers the top and schools of Grunts, Snappers, Chromis and Angelfish cover the reef. Swimming in the sandy areas just off the reef are large and small Hogfish.

Shark Paradise: This beautiful reef received its name from the different types of sharks you can find here at any given time. While enjoying the marine life covering Shark Paradise we have seen, Nurse, Caribbean and Lemon Sharks. Once in a while we even get a beautiful Tiger Shark in the area.

Fishtail: Is located just to the south of Shark Paradise. Due to its location we sometimes get a chance to see a shark while diving the beautiful reef which is covered with Gorgonians, Yellow Sea Whips, Sea Plumes, Orange Spiny Sea Rods and Sea Fans. When you can add a mix of hard corals and a variety of lots of tropical fish you have the perfect spot to enjoy.

Sugar Wreck: This is one of the crew members favorite shallow sites. During the late 1800's a barge carrying molasses sank in 18-20 feet of water in the middle of nowhere on the Little Bahama Bank. Soon fish and other marine life found this to be a great hiding place and soon the wreck was covered with marine life. At any given time we can find the resident Green Moray Eel, or Nurse Shark and everyone's favorite, the Hawksbill Turtle that comes up close for pictures and video.

El Dorado: Starting in 40 feet and sloping towards a sandy bottom around 70 feet, guests will enjoy seeing Lobsters, huge Channel Clinging Crabs, Banded Coral Shrimp and schools of fish. At night Octopus, Squid, Turtles resting, Eels swimming out in the open and an array of hard and soft Corals are seen.

El Captainan: A huge underwater mound that is covered with Gorgonians and hard corals. Just off to the side are two large pinnacles. The top of the main mound starts around 45-50 feet and the bottom 90 feet. You can easily follow schools of fish or stay in one small area and look for lots of macro and small animal life.

Tiger Beach: A beautiful beach area that sits in 15 feet of water. There’s a white sandy bottom that seems to always have Sharks. Most of the Sharks seen are Lemon Sharks ranging from 4-7 feet in length. Also seen are Caribbean Reef Sharks, Nurse Sharks and Tiger Sharks.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
24 May 2025
8D/7N
[Freeport-Freeport] Grand Bahama West End with Tiger Beach [24 May 25 - 31 May 25]
Tiger Beach Mount Olympus: The top of the reef is 45-50 feet, down one side you reach the sand ar...
See Itinerary

Tiger Beach

Mount Olympus: The top of the reef is 45-50 feet, down one side you reach the sand around 95 feet, down the other side it just keep going creating a wonderful wall. Guests could spend all day diving this area and never cover all of Mount Olympus.

Mini Wall: This dive site has two mounds running side by side with a small patch of white sand between these mounds covered with marine life. The first of the coral mounds starts around 35 feet and slopes down to around 70 feet. The second mound starts around 40 feet and slopes to about 85 feet. Both mounds as they slope give the look of a small wall.

Hog Fish: A shallow dive ranging from 30-45 feet. As you swim along Hogfish Reef you will notice lots of crevices and ledges to look under for small creatures. A garden of soft corals with hard corals covers the top and schools of Grunts, Snappers, Chromis and Angelfish cover the reef. Swimming in the sandy areas just off the reef are large and small Hogfish.

Shark Paradise: This beautiful reef received its name from the different types of sharks you can find here at any given time. While enjoying the marine life covering Shark Paradise we have seen, Nurse, Caribbean and Lemon Sharks. Once in a while we even get a beautiful Tiger Shark in the area.

Fishtail: Is located just to the south of Shark Paradise. Due to its location we sometimes get a chance to see a shark while diving the beautiful reef which is covered with Gorgonians, Yellow Sea Whips, Sea Plumes, Orange Spiny Sea Rods and Sea Fans. When you can add a mix of hard corals and a variety of lots of tropical fish you have the perfect spot to enjoy.

Sugar Wreck: This is one of the crew members favorite shallow sites. During the late 1800's a barge carrying molasses sank in 18-20 feet of water in the middle of nowhere on the Little Bahama Bank. Soon fish and other marine life found this to be a great hiding place and soon the wreck was covered with marine life. At any given time we can find the resident Green Moray Eel, or Nurse Shark and everyone's favorite, the Hawksbill Turtle that comes up close for pictures and video.

El Dorado: Starting in 40 feet and sloping towards a sandy bottom around 70 feet, guests will enjoy seeing Lobsters, huge Channel Clinging Crabs, Banded Coral Shrimp and schools of fish. At night Octopus, Squid, Turtles resting, Eels swimming out in the open and an array of hard and soft Corals are seen.

El Captainan: A huge underwater mound that is covered with Gorgonians and hard corals. Just off to the side are two large pinnacles. The top of the main mound starts around 45-50 feet and the bottom 90 feet. You can easily follow schools of fish or stay in one small area and look for lots of macro and small animal life.

Tiger Beach: A beautiful beach area that sits in 15 feet of water. There’s a white sandy bottom that seems to always have Sharks. Most of the Sharks seen are Lemon Sharks ranging from 4-7 feet in length. Also seen are Caribbean Reef Sharks, Nurse Sharks and Tiger Sharks.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
31 May 2025
8D/7N
[Freeport-Freeport] Grand Bahama West End with Tiger Beach [31 May 25 - 07 Jun 25]
Tiger Beach Mount Olympus: The top of the reef is 45-50 feet, down one side you reach the sand ar...
See Itinerary

Tiger Beach

Mount Olympus: The top of the reef is 45-50 feet, down one side you reach the sand around 95 feet, down the other side it just keep going creating a wonderful wall. Guests could spend all day diving this area and never cover all of Mount Olympus.

Mini Wall: This dive site has two mounds running side by side with a small patch of white sand between these mounds covered with marine life. The first of the coral mounds starts around 35 feet and slopes down to around 70 feet. The second mound starts around 40 feet and slopes to about 85 feet. Both mounds as they slope give the look of a small wall.

Hog Fish: A shallow dive ranging from 30-45 feet. As you swim along Hogfish Reef you will notice lots of crevices and ledges to look under for small creatures. A garden of soft corals with hard corals covers the top and schools of Grunts, Snappers, Chromis and Angelfish cover the reef. Swimming in the sandy areas just off the reef are large and small Hogfish.

Shark Paradise: This beautiful reef received its name from the different types of sharks you can find here at any given time. While enjoying the marine life covering Shark Paradise we have seen, Nurse, Caribbean and Lemon Sharks. Once in a while we even get a beautiful Tiger Shark in the area.

Fishtail: Is located just to the south of Shark Paradise. Due to its location we sometimes get a chance to see a shark while diving the beautiful reef which is covered with Gorgonians, Yellow Sea Whips, Sea Plumes, Orange Spiny Sea Rods and Sea Fans. When you can add a mix of hard corals and a variety of lots of tropical fish you have the perfect spot to enjoy.

Sugar Wreck: This is one of the crew members favorite shallow sites. During the late 1800's a barge carrying molasses sank in 18-20 feet of water in the middle of nowhere on the Little Bahama Bank. Soon fish and other marine life found this to be a great hiding place and soon the wreck was covered with marine life. At any given time we can find the resident Green Moray Eel, or Nurse Shark and everyone's favorite, the Hawksbill Turtle that comes up close for pictures and video.

El Dorado: Starting in 40 feet and sloping towards a sandy bottom around 70 feet, guests will enjoy seeing Lobsters, huge Channel Clinging Crabs, Banded Coral Shrimp and schools of fish. At night Octopus, Squid, Turtles resting, Eels swimming out in the open and an array of hard and soft Corals are seen.

El Captainan: A huge underwater mound that is covered with Gorgonians and hard corals. Just off to the side are two large pinnacles. The top of the main mound starts around 45-50 feet and the bottom 90 feet. You can easily follow schools of fish or stay in one small area and look for lots of macro and small animal life.

Tiger Beach: A beautiful beach area that sits in 15 feet of water. There’s a white sandy bottom that seems to always have Sharks. Most of the Sharks seen are Lemon Sharks ranging from 4-7 feet in length. Also seen are Caribbean Reef Sharks, Nurse Sharks and Tiger Sharks.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
07 Jun 2025
8D/7N
[Freeport-Freeport] Grand Bahama West End with Tiger Beach [07 Jun 25 - 14 Jun 25]
Tiger Beach Mount Olympus: The top of the reef is 45-50 feet, down one side you reach the sand ar...
See Itinerary

Tiger Beach

Mount Olympus: The top of the reef is 45-50 feet, down one side you reach the sand around 95 feet, down the other side it just keep going creating a wonderful wall. Guests could spend all day diving this area and never cover all of Mount Olympus.

Mini Wall: This dive site has two mounds running side by side with a small patch of white sand between these mounds covered with marine life. The first of the coral mounds starts around 35 feet and slopes down to around 70 feet. The second mound starts around 40 feet and slopes to about 85 feet. Both mounds as they slope give the look of a small wall.

Hog Fish: A shallow dive ranging from 30-45 feet. As you swim along Hogfish Reef you will notice lots of crevices and ledges to look under for small creatures. A garden of soft corals with hard corals covers the top and schools of Grunts, Snappers, Chromis and Angelfish cover the reef. Swimming in the sandy areas just off the reef are large and small Hogfish.

Shark Paradise: This beautiful reef received its name from the different types of sharks you can find here at any given time. While enjoying the marine life covering Shark Paradise we have seen, Nurse, Caribbean and Lemon Sharks. Once in a while we even get a beautiful Tiger Shark in the area.

Fishtail: Is located just to the south of Shark Paradise. Due to its location we sometimes get a chance to see a shark while diving the beautiful reef which is covered with Gorgonians, Yellow Sea Whips, Sea Plumes, Orange Spiny Sea Rods and Sea Fans. When you can add a mix of hard corals and a variety of lots of tropical fish you have the perfect spot to enjoy.

Sugar Wreck: This is one of the crew members favorite shallow sites. During the late 1800's a barge carrying molasses sank in 18-20 feet of water in the middle of nowhere on the Little Bahama Bank. Soon fish and other marine life found this to be a great hiding place and soon the wreck was covered with marine life. At any given time we can find the resident Green Moray Eel, or Nurse Shark and everyone's favorite, the Hawksbill Turtle that comes up close for pictures and video.

El Dorado: Starting in 40 feet and sloping towards a sandy bottom around 70 feet, guests will enjoy seeing Lobsters, huge Channel Clinging Crabs, Banded Coral Shrimp and schools of fish. At night Octopus, Squid, Turtles resting, Eels swimming out in the open and an array of hard and soft Corals are seen.

El Captainan: A huge underwater mound that is covered with Gorgonians and hard corals. Just off to the side are two large pinnacles. The top of the main mound starts around 45-50 feet and the bottom 90 feet. You can easily follow schools of fish or stay in one small area and look for lots of macro and small animal life.

Tiger Beach: A beautiful beach area that sits in 15 feet of water. There’s a white sandy bottom that seems to always have Sharks. Most of the Sharks seen are Lemon Sharks ranging from 4-7 feet in length. Also seen are Caribbean Reef Sharks, Nurse Sharks and Tiger Sharks.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
14 Jun 2025
8D/7N
[Freeport-Freeport] Grand Bahama West End with Tiger Beach [14 Jun 25 - 21 Jun 25]
Tiger Beach Mount Olympus: The top of the reef is 45-50 feet, down one side you reach the sand ar...
See Itinerary

Tiger Beach

Mount Olympus: The top of the reef is 45-50 feet, down one side you reach the sand around 95 feet, down the other side it just keep going creating a wonderful wall. Guests could spend all day diving this area and never cover all of Mount Olympus.

Mini Wall: This dive site has two mounds running side by side with a small patch of white sand between these mounds covered with marine life. The first of the coral mounds starts around 35 feet and slopes down to around 70 feet. The second mound starts around 40 feet and slopes to about 85 feet. Both mounds as they slope give the look of a small wall.

Hog Fish: A shallow dive ranging from 30-45 feet. As you swim along Hogfish Reef you will notice lots of crevices and ledges to look under for small creatures. A garden of soft corals with hard corals covers the top and schools of Grunts, Snappers, Chromis and Angelfish cover the reef. Swimming in the sandy areas just off the reef are large and small Hogfish.

Shark Paradise: This beautiful reef received its name from the different types of sharks you can find here at any given time. While enjoying the marine life covering Shark Paradise we have seen, Nurse, Caribbean and Lemon Sharks. Once in a while we even get a beautiful Tiger Shark in the area.

Fishtail: Is located just to the south of Shark Paradise. Due to its location we sometimes get a chance to see a shark while diving the beautiful reef which is covered with Gorgonians, Yellow Sea Whips, Sea Plumes, Orange Spiny Sea Rods and Sea Fans. When you can add a mix of hard corals and a variety of lots of tropical fish you have the perfect spot to enjoy.

Sugar Wreck: This is one of the crew members favorite shallow sites. During the late 1800's a barge carrying molasses sank in 18-20 feet of water in the middle of nowhere on the Little Bahama Bank. Soon fish and other marine life found this to be a great hiding place and soon the wreck was covered with marine life. At any given time we can find the resident Green Moray Eel, or Nurse Shark and everyone's favorite, the Hawksbill Turtle that comes up close for pictures and video.

El Dorado: Starting in 40 feet and sloping towards a sandy bottom around 70 feet, guests will enjoy seeing Lobsters, huge Channel Clinging Crabs, Banded Coral Shrimp and schools of fish. At night Octopus, Squid, Turtles resting, Eels swimming out in the open and an array of hard and soft Corals are seen.

El Captainan: A huge underwater mound that is covered with Gorgonians and hard corals. Just off to the side are two large pinnacles. The top of the main mound starts around 45-50 feet and the bottom 90 feet. You can easily follow schools of fish or stay in one small area and look for lots of macro and small animal life.

Tiger Beach: A beautiful beach area that sits in 15 feet of water. There’s a white sandy bottom that seems to always have Sharks. Most of the Sharks seen are Lemon Sharks ranging from 4-7 feet in length. Also seen are Caribbean Reef Sharks, Nurse Sharks and Tiger Sharks.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
21 Jun 2025
8D/7N
[Freeport-Freeport] Grand Bahama West End with Tiger Beach [21 Jun 25 - 28 Jun 25]
Tiger Beach Mount Olympus: The top of the reef is 45-50 feet, down one side you reach the sand ar...
See Itinerary

Tiger Beach

Mount Olympus: The top of the reef is 45-50 feet, down one side you reach the sand around 95 feet, down the other side it just keep going creating a wonderful wall. Guests could spend all day diving this area and never cover all of Mount Olympus.

Mini Wall: This dive site has two mounds running side by side with a small patch of white sand between these mounds covered with marine life. The first of the coral mounds starts around 35 feet and slopes down to around 70 feet. The second mound starts around 40 feet and slopes to about 85 feet. Both mounds as they slope give the look of a small wall.

Hog Fish: A shallow dive ranging from 30-45 feet. As you swim along Hogfish Reef you will notice lots of crevices and ledges to look under for small creatures. A garden of soft corals with hard corals covers the top and schools of Grunts, Snappers, Chromis and Angelfish cover the reef. Swimming in the sandy areas just off the reef are large and small Hogfish.

Shark Paradise: This beautiful reef received its name from the different types of sharks you can find here at any given time. While enjoying the marine life covering Shark Paradise we have seen, Nurse, Caribbean and Lemon Sharks. Once in a while we even get a beautiful Tiger Shark in the area.

Fishtail: Is located just to the south of Shark Paradise. Due to its location we sometimes get a chance to see a shark while diving the beautiful reef which is covered with Gorgonians, Yellow Sea Whips, Sea Plumes, Orange Spiny Sea Rods and Sea Fans. When you can add a mix of hard corals and a variety of lots of tropical fish you have the perfect spot to enjoy.

Sugar Wreck: This is one of the crew members favorite shallow sites. During the late 1800's a barge carrying molasses sank in 18-20 feet of water in the middle of nowhere on the Little Bahama Bank. Soon fish and other marine life found this to be a great hiding place and soon the wreck was covered with marine life. At any given time we can find the resident Green Moray Eel, or Nurse Shark and everyone's favorite, the Hawksbill Turtle that comes up close for pictures and video.

El Dorado: Starting in 40 feet and sloping towards a sandy bottom around 70 feet, guests will enjoy seeing Lobsters, huge Channel Clinging Crabs, Banded Coral Shrimp and schools of fish. At night Octopus, Squid, Turtles resting, Eels swimming out in the open and an array of hard and soft Corals are seen.

El Captainan: A huge underwater mound that is covered with Gorgonians and hard corals. Just off to the side are two large pinnacles. The top of the main mound starts around 45-50 feet and the bottom 90 feet. You can easily follow schools of fish or stay in one small area and look for lots of macro and small animal life.

Tiger Beach: A beautiful beach area that sits in 15 feet of water. There’s a white sandy bottom that seems to always have Sharks. Most of the Sharks seen are Lemon Sharks ranging from 4-7 feet in length. Also seen are Caribbean Reef Sharks, Nurse Sharks and Tiger Sharks.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
28 Jun 2025
8D/7N
[Freeport-Freeport] Grand Bahama West End with Tiger Beach [28 Jun 25 - 05 Jul 25]
Tiger Beach Mount Olympus: The top of the reef is 45-50 feet, down one side you reach the sand ar...
See Itinerary

Tiger Beach

Mount Olympus: The top of the reef is 45-50 feet, down one side you reach the sand around 95 feet, down the other side it just keep going creating a wonderful wall. Guests could spend all day diving this area and never cover all of Mount Olympus.

Mini Wall: This dive site has two mounds running side by side with a small patch of white sand between these mounds covered with marine life. The first of the coral mounds starts around 35 feet and slopes down to around 70 feet. The second mound starts around 40 feet and slopes to about 85 feet. Both mounds as they slope give the look of a small wall.

Hog Fish: A shallow dive ranging from 30-45 feet. As you swim along Hogfish Reef you will notice lots of crevices and ledges to look under for small creatures. A garden of soft corals with hard corals covers the top and schools of Grunts, Snappers, Chromis and Angelfish cover the reef. Swimming in the sandy areas just off the reef are large and small Hogfish.

Shark Paradise: This beautiful reef received its name from the different types of sharks you can find here at any given time. While enjoying the marine life covering Shark Paradise we have seen, Nurse, Caribbean and Lemon Sharks. Once in a while we even get a beautiful Tiger Shark in the area.

Fishtail: Is located just to the south of Shark Paradise. Due to its location we sometimes get a chance to see a shark while diving the beautiful reef which is covered with Gorgonians, Yellow Sea Whips, Sea Plumes, Orange Spiny Sea Rods and Sea Fans. When you can add a mix of hard corals and a variety of lots of tropical fish you have the perfect spot to enjoy.

Sugar Wreck: This is one of the crew members favorite shallow sites. During the late 1800's a barge carrying molasses sank in 18-20 feet of water in the middle of nowhere on the Little Bahama Bank. Soon fish and other marine life found this to be a great hiding place and soon the wreck was covered with marine life. At any given time we can find the resident Green Moray Eel, or Nurse Shark and everyone's favorite, the Hawksbill Turtle that comes up close for pictures and video.

El Dorado: Starting in 40 feet and sloping towards a sandy bottom around 70 feet, guests will enjoy seeing Lobsters, huge Channel Clinging Crabs, Banded Coral Shrimp and schools of fish. At night Octopus, Squid, Turtles resting, Eels swimming out in the open and an array of hard and soft Corals are seen.

El Captainan: A huge underwater mound that is covered with Gorgonians and hard corals. Just off to the side are two large pinnacles. The top of the main mound starts around 45-50 feet and the bottom 90 feet. You can easily follow schools of fish or stay in one small area and look for lots of macro and small animal life.

Tiger Beach: A beautiful beach area that sits in 15 feet of water. There’s a white sandy bottom that seems to always have Sharks. Most of the Sharks seen are Lemon Sharks ranging from 4-7 feet in length. Also seen are Caribbean Reef Sharks, Nurse Sharks and Tiger Sharks.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
05 Jul 2025
8D/7N
[Freeport-Freeport] Grand Bahama West End with Tiger Beach [05 Jul 25 - 12 Jul 25]
Tiger Beach Mount Olympus: The top of the reef is 45-50 feet, down one side you reach the sand ar...
See Itinerary

Tiger Beach

Mount Olympus: The top of the reef is 45-50 feet, down one side you reach the sand around 95 feet, down the other side it just keep going creating a wonderful wall. Guests could spend all day diving this area and never cover all of Mount Olympus.

Mini Wall: This dive site has two mounds running side by side with a small patch of white sand between these mounds covered with marine life. The first of the coral mounds starts around 35 feet and slopes down to around 70 feet. The second mound starts around 40 feet and slopes to about 85 feet. Both mounds as they slope give the look of a small wall.

Hog Fish: A shallow dive ranging from 30-45 feet. As you swim along Hogfish Reef you will notice lots of crevices and ledges to look under for small creatures. A garden of soft corals with hard corals covers the top and schools of Grunts, Snappers, Chromis and Angelfish cover the reef. Swimming in the sandy areas just off the reef are large and small Hogfish.

Shark Paradise: This beautiful reef received its name from the different types of sharks you can find here at any given time. While enjoying the marine life covering Shark Paradise we have seen, Nurse, Caribbean and Lemon Sharks. Once in a while we even get a beautiful Tiger Shark in the area.

Fishtail: Is located just to the south of Shark Paradise. Due to its location we sometimes get a chance to see a shark while diving the beautiful reef which is covered with Gorgonians, Yellow Sea Whips, Sea Plumes, Orange Spiny Sea Rods and Sea Fans. When you can add a mix of hard corals and a variety of lots of tropical fish you have the perfect spot to enjoy.

Sugar Wreck: This is one of the crew members favorite shallow sites. During the late 1800's a barge carrying molasses sank in 18-20 feet of water in the middle of nowhere on the Little Bahama Bank. Soon fish and other marine life found this to be a great hiding place and soon the wreck was covered with marine life. At any given time we can find the resident Green Moray Eel, or Nurse Shark and everyone's favorite, the Hawksbill Turtle that comes up close for pictures and video.

El Dorado: Starting in 40 feet and sloping towards a sandy bottom around 70 feet, guests will enjoy seeing Lobsters, huge Channel Clinging Crabs, Banded Coral Shrimp and schools of fish. At night Octopus, Squid, Turtles resting, Eels swimming out in the open and an array of hard and soft Corals are seen.

El Captainan: A huge underwater mound that is covered with Gorgonians and hard corals. Just off to the side are two large pinnacles. The top of the main mound starts around 45-50 feet and the bottom 90 feet. You can easily follow schools of fish or stay in one small area and look for lots of macro and small animal life.

Tiger Beach: A beautiful beach area that sits in 15 feet of water. There’s a white sandy bottom that seems to always have Sharks. Most of the Sharks seen are Lemon Sharks ranging from 4-7 feet in length. Also seen are Caribbean Reef Sharks, Nurse Sharks and Tiger Sharks.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
12 Jul 2025
8D/7N
[Freeport-Freeport] Grand Bahama West End with Tiger Beach [12 Jul 25 - 19 Jul 25]
Tiger Beach Mount Olympus: The top of the reef is 45-50 feet, down one side you reach the sand ar...
See Itinerary

Tiger Beach

Mount Olympus: The top of the reef is 45-50 feet, down one side you reach the sand around 95 feet, down the other side it just keep going creating a wonderful wall. Guests could spend all day diving this area and never cover all of Mount Olympus.

Mini Wall: This dive site has two mounds running side by side with a small patch of white sand between these mounds covered with marine life. The first of the coral mounds starts around 35 feet and slopes down to around 70 feet. The second mound starts around 40 feet and slopes to about 85 feet. Both mounds as they slope give the look of a small wall.

Hog Fish: A shallow dive ranging from 30-45 feet. As you swim along Hogfish Reef you will notice lots of crevices and ledges to look under for small creatures. A garden of soft corals with hard corals covers the top and schools of Grunts, Snappers, Chromis and Angelfish cover the reef. Swimming in the sandy areas just off the reef are large and small Hogfish.

Shark Paradise: This beautiful reef received its name from the different types of sharks you can find here at any given time. While enjoying the marine life covering Shark Paradise we have seen, Nurse, Caribbean and Lemon Sharks. Once in a while we even get a beautiful Tiger Shark in the area.

Fishtail: Is located just to the south of Shark Paradise. Due to its location we sometimes get a chance to see a shark while diving the beautiful reef which is covered with Gorgonians, Yellow Sea Whips, Sea Plumes, Orange Spiny Sea Rods and Sea Fans. When you can add a mix of hard corals and a variety of lots of tropical fish you have the perfect spot to enjoy.

Sugar Wreck: This is one of the crew members favorite shallow sites. During the late 1800's a barge carrying molasses sank in 18-20 feet of water in the middle of nowhere on the Little Bahama Bank. Soon fish and other marine life found this to be a great hiding place and soon the wreck was covered with marine life. At any given time we can find the resident Green Moray Eel, or Nurse Shark and everyone's favorite, the Hawksbill Turtle that comes up close for pictures and video.

El Dorado: Starting in 40 feet and sloping towards a sandy bottom around 70 feet, guests will enjoy seeing Lobsters, huge Channel Clinging Crabs, Banded Coral Shrimp and schools of fish. At night Octopus, Squid, Turtles resting, Eels swimming out in the open and an array of hard and soft Corals are seen.

El Captainan: A huge underwater mound that is covered with Gorgonians and hard corals. Just off to the side are two large pinnacles. The top of the main mound starts around 45-50 feet and the bottom 90 feet. You can easily follow schools of fish or stay in one small area and look for lots of macro and small animal life.

Tiger Beach: A beautiful beach area that sits in 15 feet of water. There’s a white sandy bottom that seems to always have Sharks. Most of the Sharks seen are Lemon Sharks ranging from 4-7 feet in length. Also seen are Caribbean Reef Sharks, Nurse Sharks and Tiger Sharks.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
19 Jul 2025
8D/7N
[Freeport-Freeport] Grand Bahama West End with Tiger Beach [19 Jul 25 - 26 Jul 25]
Tiger Beach Mount Olympus: The top of the reef is 45-50 feet, down one side you reach the sand ar...
See Itinerary

Tiger Beach

Mount Olympus: The top of the reef is 45-50 feet, down one side you reach the sand around 95 feet, down the other side it just keep going creating a wonderful wall. Guests could spend all day diving this area and never cover all of Mount Olympus.

Mini Wall: This dive site has two mounds running side by side with a small patch of white sand between these mounds covered with marine life. The first of the coral mounds starts around 35 feet and slopes down to around 70 feet. The second mound starts around 40 feet and slopes to about 85 feet. Both mounds as they slope give the look of a small wall.

Hog Fish: A shallow dive ranging from 30-45 feet. As you swim along Hogfish Reef you will notice lots of crevices and ledges to look under for small creatures. A garden of soft corals with hard corals covers the top and schools of Grunts, Snappers, Chromis and Angelfish cover the reef. Swimming in the sandy areas just off the reef are large and small Hogfish.

Shark Paradise: This beautiful reef received its name from the different types of sharks you can find here at any given time. While enjoying the marine life covering Shark Paradise we have seen, Nurse, Caribbean and Lemon Sharks. Once in a while we even get a beautiful Tiger Shark in the area.

Fishtail: Is located just to the south of Shark Paradise. Due to its location we sometimes get a chance to see a shark while diving the beautiful reef which is covered with Gorgonians, Yellow Sea Whips, Sea Plumes, Orange Spiny Sea Rods and Sea Fans. When you can add a mix of hard corals and a variety of lots of tropical fish you have the perfect spot to enjoy.

Sugar Wreck: This is one of the crew members favorite shallow sites. During the late 1800's a barge carrying molasses sank in 18-20 feet of water in the middle of nowhere on the Little Bahama Bank. Soon fish and other marine life found this to be a great hiding place and soon the wreck was covered with marine life. At any given time we can find the resident Green Moray Eel, or Nurse Shark and everyone's favorite, the Hawksbill Turtle that comes up close for pictures and video.

El Dorado: Starting in 40 feet and sloping towards a sandy bottom around 70 feet, guests will enjoy seeing Lobsters, huge Channel Clinging Crabs, Banded Coral Shrimp and schools of fish. At night Octopus, Squid, Turtles resting, Eels swimming out in the open and an array of hard and soft Corals are seen.

El Captainan: A huge underwater mound that is covered with Gorgonians and hard corals. Just off to the side are two large pinnacles. The top of the main mound starts around 45-50 feet and the bottom 90 feet. You can easily follow schools of fish or stay in one small area and look for lots of macro and small animal life.

Tiger Beach: A beautiful beach area that sits in 15 feet of water. There’s a white sandy bottom that seems to always have Sharks. Most of the Sharks seen are Lemon Sharks ranging from 4-7 feet in length. Also seen are Caribbean Reef Sharks, Nurse Sharks and Tiger Sharks.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
27 Jul 2025
7D/6N
[Nassau-Nassau] Exuma Cays and Southwest Eleuthera [27 Jul 25 - 02 Aug 25]
Exuma Cays The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over ...
See Itinerary

Exuma Cays

The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over 120 miles from just south of new Providence to the anchor islands of Great and Little Exuma to the south. The Exuma Cays are a part of the more remote Out Islands of the Bahamas. The Cays are the most exotic of these islands, a collection of sandy jewels set in the aquamarine and sapphire of some of the most beautiful waters in the world along with an intriguing combination of walls and rich shallow reefs.

Nassau

Lost Blue Hole: The rim of this large blue hole lies in 40' of water surrounded by coral heads, stingrays, and many schools of fish. There is a lobster filled crevice at 80'. In the sand surrounding the hole, divers find many small fish such as banded jawfish, Seminole gobies, and tobacco fish. There are usually one or two nurse sharks and during the spring a large school of blacknose sharks inhabits the bottom of the 200' hole.

Periwinkle Reef: This is a shallow patch-reef teaming with fish. The local Nassau tour operators feed fish here, so sergeant majors and angelfish approach scuba divers looking for a handout.

 

Exumas

Amberjack Reef: This 50' patch-reef that has prolific fish life including reef sharks and up to ten large groupers. This dive also has many interesting small critters such as pirate blennies and garden eels. During the safety stop divers may be surrounded by 100+ horse-eye jacks that school under the yacht.

Austin Smith Wreck: A 90' Bahamian Defense Force cutter lying in 60’ of water that, ironically, sank in 1995 while being towed to San Salvador to be sunk there as a dive site.

Barracuda Shoals: This bankside patch reef has huge schools of fish as well as many small critters on the reef and surrounding sand.

Blacktip Wall: Hammerhead sharks have been sighted frequently on this wall. This reef is also where Ned Deloach (the popular Reef Identification books co-author) discovered the rare Lemon goby.

Cathedral: This site is part of the Dog Rocks Reef. This reef starts at 35' and slopes off to 50' before dropping straight down into the Exuma Sound. The “cathedral” is a large swim-through where light filters down from above reflecting off thousands of silversides. This swim-through also has many groupers and jacks that come to feed on the silversides. The wall has large stands of black coral and orange elephant ear and tube sponges. Pelagics such as eagle rays and sharks are frequently seen just off the wall.

Cracked Coral Head: This massive coral head rises 40' off the bottom. Several large swim-thruoughs make it look like it is cracked giving it the name.

Jeep Reef: This site named for a coral-encrusted jeep that sits near the mooring is in the middle of the Exumas Land & Sea Park and hosts a healthy population of fish. It is also one of the prettiest reefs you will ever see. Current that sweeps through this cut keeps the reef 's corals healthy.

Pillar Wall: One of many excellent wall dives. It starts at 30' and slopes to 50' before dropping 5,000' to the bottom. There are many caves and crevices. There is also a large colony of yellowhead jawfish in the rubble inside the reef.


Southwest Eleuthera

Cave Rock: A large coral mound in 50' of water surrounded by several smaller coral heads. There are several caves where you can swim from one side to the other. The large variety of corals and fish will amaze you. Hammerhead sharks have been seen here frequently.

Monolith: Large mounds of coral rise out of the sand at the edge of the wall. They start at 100' depth and rise to 55'. There is a colony of garden eels in the sand next to the mounds.
 

Little San Sal (Half Moon Cay)

Cave Reef: This 40' shallow patch reef has several large swim-throughs cutting in the middle of the reef.

Empress Pinnacles: This wall dive features 30' high pinnacles coming out of the sand at the edge of the wall. Pelagic animals are seen frequently in the clear water off the wall. There are large branches of black coral growing on the sides of the pinnacles.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
02 Aug 2025
8D/7N
[Nassau-Nassau] Exuma Cays and Southwest Eleuthera [02 Aug 25 - 09 Aug 25]
Exuma Cays The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over ...
See Itinerary

Exuma Cays

The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over 120 miles from just south of new Providence to the anchor islands of Great and Little Exuma to the south. The Exuma Cays are a part of the more remote Out Islands of the Bahamas. The Cays are the most exotic of these islands, a collection of sandy jewels set in the aquamarine and sapphire of some of the most beautiful waters in the world along with an intriguing combination of walls and rich shallow reefs.

Nassau

Lost Blue Hole: The rim of this large blue hole lies in 40' of water surrounded by coral heads, stingrays, and many schools of fish. There is a lobster filled crevice at 80'. In the sand surrounding the hole, divers find many small fish such as banded jawfish, Seminole gobies, and tobacco fish. There are usually one or two nurse sharks and during the spring a large school of blacknose sharks inhabits the bottom of the 200' hole.

Periwinkle Reef: This is a shallow patch-reef teaming with fish. The local Nassau tour operators feed fish here, so sergeant majors and angelfish approach scuba divers looking for a handout.

 

Exumas

Amberjack Reef: This 50' patch-reef that has prolific fish life including reef sharks and up to ten large groupers. This dive also has many interesting small critters such as pirate blennies and garden eels. During the safety stop divers may be surrounded by 100+ horse-eye jacks that school under the yacht.

Austin Smith Wreck: A 90' Bahamian Defense Force cutter lying in 60’ of water that, ironically, sank in 1995 while being towed to San Salvador to be sunk there as a dive site.

Barracuda Shoals: This bankside patch reef has huge schools of fish as well as many small critters on the reef and surrounding sand.

Blacktip Wall: Hammerhead sharks have been sighted frequently on this wall. This reef is also where Ned Deloach (the popular Reef Identification books co-author) discovered the rare Lemon goby.

Cathedral: This site is part of the Dog Rocks Reef. This reef starts at 35' and slopes off to 50' before dropping straight down into the Exuma Sound. The “cathedral” is a large swim-through where light filters down from above reflecting off thousands of silversides. This swim-through also has many groupers and jacks that come to feed on the silversides. The wall has large stands of black coral and orange elephant ear and tube sponges. Pelagics such as eagle rays and sharks are frequently seen just off the wall.

Cracked Coral Head: This massive coral head rises 40' off the bottom. Several large swim-thruoughs make it look like it is cracked giving it the name.

Jeep Reef: This site named for a coral-encrusted jeep that sits near the mooring is in the middle of the Exumas Land & Sea Park and hosts a healthy population of fish. It is also one of the prettiest reefs you will ever see. Current that sweeps through this cut keeps the reef 's corals healthy.

Pillar Wall: One of many excellent wall dives. It starts at 30' and slopes to 50' before dropping 5,000' to the bottom. There are many caves and crevices. There is also a large colony of yellowhead jawfish in the rubble inside the reef.


Southwest Eleuthera

Cave Rock: A large coral mound in 50' of water surrounded by several smaller coral heads. There are several caves where you can swim from one side to the other. The large variety of corals and fish will amaze you. Hammerhead sharks have been seen here frequently.

Monolith: Large mounds of coral rise out of the sand at the edge of the wall. They start at 100' depth and rise to 55'. There is a colony of garden eels in the sand next to the mounds.
 

Little San Sal (Half Moon Cay)

Cave Reef: This 40' shallow patch reef has several large swim-throughs cutting in the middle of the reef.

Empress Pinnacles: This wall dive features 30' high pinnacles coming out of the sand at the edge of the wall. Pelagic animals are seen frequently in the clear water off the wall. There are large branches of black coral growing on the sides of the pinnacles.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
09 Aug 2025
8D/7N
[Nassau-Nassau] Exuma Cays and Southwest Eleuthera [09 Aug 25 - 16 Aug 25]
Exuma Cays The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over ...
See Itinerary

Exuma Cays

The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over 120 miles from just south of new Providence to the anchor islands of Great and Little Exuma to the south. The Exuma Cays are a part of the more remote Out Islands of the Bahamas. The Cays are the most exotic of these islands, a collection of sandy jewels set in the aquamarine and sapphire of some of the most beautiful waters in the world along with an intriguing combination of walls and rich shallow reefs.

Nassau

Lost Blue Hole: The rim of this large blue hole lies in 40' of water surrounded by coral heads, stingrays, and many schools of fish. There is a lobster filled crevice at 80'. In the sand surrounding the hole, divers find many small fish such as banded jawfish, Seminole gobies, and tobacco fish. There are usually one or two nurse sharks and during the spring a large school of blacknose sharks inhabits the bottom of the 200' hole.

Periwinkle Reef: This is a shallow patch-reef teaming with fish. The local Nassau tour operators feed fish here, so sergeant majors and angelfish approach scuba divers looking for a handout.

 

Exumas

Amberjack Reef: This 50' patch-reef that has prolific fish life including reef sharks and up to ten large groupers. This dive also has many interesting small critters such as pirate blennies and garden eels. During the safety stop divers may be surrounded by 100+ horse-eye jacks that school under the yacht.

Austin Smith Wreck: A 90' Bahamian Defense Force cutter lying in 60’ of water that, ironically, sank in 1995 while being towed to San Salvador to be sunk there as a dive site.

Barracuda Shoals: This bankside patch reef has huge schools of fish as well as many small critters on the reef and surrounding sand.

Blacktip Wall: Hammerhead sharks have been sighted frequently on this wall. This reef is also where Ned Deloach (the popular Reef Identification books co-author) discovered the rare Lemon goby.

Cathedral: This site is part of the Dog Rocks Reef. This reef starts at 35' and slopes off to 50' before dropping straight down into the Exuma Sound. The “cathedral” is a large swim-through where light filters down from above reflecting off thousands of silversides. This swim-through also has many groupers and jacks that come to feed on the silversides. The wall has large stands of black coral and orange elephant ear and tube sponges. Pelagics such as eagle rays and sharks are frequently seen just off the wall.

Cracked Coral Head: This massive coral head rises 40' off the bottom. Several large swim-thruoughs make it look like it is cracked giving it the name.

Jeep Reef: This site named for a coral-encrusted jeep that sits near the mooring is in the middle of the Exumas Land & Sea Park and hosts a healthy population of fish. It is also one of the prettiest reefs you will ever see. Current that sweeps through this cut keeps the reef 's corals healthy.

Pillar Wall: One of many excellent wall dives. It starts at 30' and slopes to 50' before dropping 5,000' to the bottom. There are many caves and crevices. There is also a large colony of yellowhead jawfish in the rubble inside the reef.


Southwest Eleuthera

Cave Rock: A large coral mound in 50' of water surrounded by several smaller coral heads. There are several caves where you can swim from one side to the other. The large variety of corals and fish will amaze you. Hammerhead sharks have been seen here frequently.

Monolith: Large mounds of coral rise out of the sand at the edge of the wall. They start at 100' depth and rise to 55'. There is a colony of garden eels in the sand next to the mounds.
 

Little San Sal (Half Moon Cay)

Cave Reef: This 40' shallow patch reef has several large swim-throughs cutting in the middle of the reef.

Empress Pinnacles: This wall dive features 30' high pinnacles coming out of the sand at the edge of the wall. Pelagic animals are seen frequently in the clear water off the wall. There are large branches of black coral growing on the sides of the pinnacles.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
16 Aug 2025
8D/7N
[Nassau-Nassau] Exuma Cays and Southwest Eleuthera [16 Aug 25 - 23 Aug 25]
Exuma Cays The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over ...
See Itinerary

Exuma Cays

The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over 120 miles from just south of new Providence to the anchor islands of Great and Little Exuma to the south. The Exuma Cays are a part of the more remote Out Islands of the Bahamas. The Cays are the most exotic of these islands, a collection of sandy jewels set in the aquamarine and sapphire of some of the most beautiful waters in the world along with an intriguing combination of walls and rich shallow reefs.

Nassau

Lost Blue Hole: The rim of this large blue hole lies in 40' of water surrounded by coral heads, stingrays, and many schools of fish. There is a lobster filled crevice at 80'. In the sand surrounding the hole, divers find many small fish such as banded jawfish, Seminole gobies, and tobacco fish. There are usually one or two nurse sharks and during the spring a large school of blacknose sharks inhabits the bottom of the 200' hole.

Periwinkle Reef: This is a shallow patch-reef teaming with fish. The local Nassau tour operators feed fish here, so sergeant majors and angelfish approach scuba divers looking for a handout.

 

Exumas

Amberjack Reef: This 50' patch-reef that has prolific fish life including reef sharks and up to ten large groupers. This dive also has many interesting small critters such as pirate blennies and garden eels. During the safety stop divers may be surrounded by 100+ horse-eye jacks that school under the yacht.

Austin Smith Wreck: A 90' Bahamian Defense Force cutter lying in 60’ of water that, ironically, sank in 1995 while being towed to San Salvador to be sunk there as a dive site.

Barracuda Shoals: This bankside patch reef has huge schools of fish as well as many small critters on the reef and surrounding sand.

Blacktip Wall: Hammerhead sharks have been sighted frequently on this wall. This reef is also where Ned Deloach (the popular Reef Identification books co-author) discovered the rare Lemon goby.

Cathedral: This site is part of the Dog Rocks Reef. This reef starts at 35' and slopes off to 50' before dropping straight down into the Exuma Sound. The “cathedral” is a large swim-through where light filters down from above reflecting off thousands of silversides. This swim-through also has many groupers and jacks that come to feed on the silversides. The wall has large stands of black coral and orange elephant ear and tube sponges. Pelagics such as eagle rays and sharks are frequently seen just off the wall.

Cracked Coral Head: This massive coral head rises 40' off the bottom. Several large swim-thruoughs make it look like it is cracked giving it the name.

Jeep Reef: This site named for a coral-encrusted jeep that sits near the mooring is in the middle of the Exumas Land & Sea Park and hosts a healthy population of fish. It is also one of the prettiest reefs you will ever see. Current that sweeps through this cut keeps the reef 's corals healthy.

Pillar Wall: One of many excellent wall dives. It starts at 30' and slopes to 50' before dropping 5,000' to the bottom. There are many caves and crevices. There is also a large colony of yellowhead jawfish in the rubble inside the reef.


Southwest Eleuthera

Cave Rock: A large coral mound in 50' of water surrounded by several smaller coral heads. There are several caves where you can swim from one side to the other. The large variety of corals and fish will amaze you. Hammerhead sharks have been seen here frequently.

Monolith: Large mounds of coral rise out of the sand at the edge of the wall. They start at 100' depth and rise to 55'. There is a colony of garden eels in the sand next to the mounds.
 

Little San Sal (Half Moon Cay)

Cave Reef: This 40' shallow patch reef has several large swim-throughs cutting in the middle of the reef.

Empress Pinnacles: This wall dive features 30' high pinnacles coming out of the sand at the edge of the wall. Pelagic animals are seen frequently in the clear water off the wall. There are large branches of black coral growing on the sides of the pinnacles.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
23 Aug 2025
8D/7N
[Nassau-Nassau] Exuma Cays and Southwest Eleuthera [23 Aug 25 - 30 Aug 25]
Exuma Cays The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over ...
See Itinerary

Exuma Cays

The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over 120 miles from just south of new Providence to the anchor islands of Great and Little Exuma to the south. The Exuma Cays are a part of the more remote Out Islands of the Bahamas. The Cays are the most exotic of these islands, a collection of sandy jewels set in the aquamarine and sapphire of some of the most beautiful waters in the world along with an intriguing combination of walls and rich shallow reefs.

Nassau

Lost Blue Hole: The rim of this large blue hole lies in 40' of water surrounded by coral heads, stingrays, and many schools of fish. There is a lobster filled crevice at 80'. In the sand surrounding the hole, divers find many small fish such as banded jawfish, Seminole gobies, and tobacco fish. There are usually one or two nurse sharks and during the spring a large school of blacknose sharks inhabits the bottom of the 200' hole.

Periwinkle Reef: This is a shallow patch-reef teaming with fish. The local Nassau tour operators feed fish here, so sergeant majors and angelfish approach scuba divers looking for a handout.

 

Exumas

Amberjack Reef: This 50' patch-reef that has prolific fish life including reef sharks and up to ten large groupers. This dive also has many interesting small critters such as pirate blennies and garden eels. During the safety stop divers may be surrounded by 100+ horse-eye jacks that school under the yacht.

Austin Smith Wreck: A 90' Bahamian Defense Force cutter lying in 60’ of water that, ironically, sank in 1995 while being towed to San Salvador to be sunk there as a dive site.

Barracuda Shoals: This bankside patch reef has huge schools of fish as well as many small critters on the reef and surrounding sand.

Blacktip Wall: Hammerhead sharks have been sighted frequently on this wall. This reef is also where Ned Deloach (the popular Reef Identification books co-author) discovered the rare Lemon goby.

Cathedral: This site is part of the Dog Rocks Reef. This reef starts at 35' and slopes off to 50' before dropping straight down into the Exuma Sound. The “cathedral” is a large swim-through where light filters down from above reflecting off thousands of silversides. This swim-through also has many groupers and jacks that come to feed on the silversides. The wall has large stands of black coral and orange elephant ear and tube sponges. Pelagics such as eagle rays and sharks are frequently seen just off the wall.

Cracked Coral Head: This massive coral head rises 40' off the bottom. Several large swim-thruoughs make it look like it is cracked giving it the name.

Jeep Reef: This site named for a coral-encrusted jeep that sits near the mooring is in the middle of the Exumas Land & Sea Park and hosts a healthy population of fish. It is also one of the prettiest reefs you will ever see. Current that sweeps through this cut keeps the reef 's corals healthy.

Pillar Wall: One of many excellent wall dives. It starts at 30' and slopes to 50' before dropping 5,000' to the bottom. There are many caves and crevices. There is also a large colony of yellowhead jawfish in the rubble inside the reef.


Southwest Eleuthera

Cave Rock: A large coral mound in 50' of water surrounded by several smaller coral heads. There are several caves where you can swim from one side to the other. The large variety of corals and fish will amaze you. Hammerhead sharks have been seen here frequently.

Monolith: Large mounds of coral rise out of the sand at the edge of the wall. They start at 100' depth and rise to 55'. There is a colony of garden eels in the sand next to the mounds.
 

Little San Sal (Half Moon Cay)

Cave Reef: This 40' shallow patch reef has several large swim-throughs cutting in the middle of the reef.

Empress Pinnacles: This wall dive features 30' high pinnacles coming out of the sand at the edge of the wall. Pelagic animals are seen frequently in the clear water off the wall. There are large branches of black coral growing on the sides of the pinnacles.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
06 Sep 2025
8D/7N
[Nassau-Nassau] Exuma Cays and Southwest Eleuthera [06 Sep 25 - 13 Sep 25]
Exuma Cays The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over ...
See Itinerary

Exuma Cays

The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over 120 miles from just south of new Providence to the anchor islands of Great and Little Exuma to the south. The Exuma Cays are a part of the more remote Out Islands of the Bahamas. The Cays are the most exotic of these islands, a collection of sandy jewels set in the aquamarine and sapphire of some of the most beautiful waters in the world along with an intriguing combination of walls and rich shallow reefs.

Nassau

Lost Blue Hole: The rim of this large blue hole lies in 40' of water surrounded by coral heads, stingrays, and many schools of fish. There is a lobster filled crevice at 80'. In the sand surrounding the hole, divers find many small fish such as banded jawfish, Seminole gobies, and tobacco fish. There are usually one or two nurse sharks and during the spring a large school of blacknose sharks inhabits the bottom of the 200' hole.

Periwinkle Reef: This is a shallow patch-reef teaming with fish. The local Nassau tour operators feed fish here, so sergeant majors and angelfish approach scuba divers looking for a handout.

 

Exumas

Amberjack Reef: This 50' patch-reef that has prolific fish life including reef sharks and up to ten large groupers. This dive also has many interesting small critters such as pirate blennies and garden eels. During the safety stop divers may be surrounded by 100+ horse-eye jacks that school under the yacht.

Austin Smith Wreck: A 90' Bahamian Defense Force cutter lying in 60’ of water that, ironically, sank in 1995 while being towed to San Salvador to be sunk there as a dive site.

Barracuda Shoals: This bankside patch reef has huge schools of fish as well as many small critters on the reef and surrounding sand.

Blacktip Wall: Hammerhead sharks have been sighted frequently on this wall. This reef is also where Ned Deloach (the popular Reef Identification books co-author) discovered the rare Lemon goby.

Cathedral: This site is part of the Dog Rocks Reef. This reef starts at 35' and slopes off to 50' before dropping straight down into the Exuma Sound. The “cathedral” is a large swim-through where light filters down from above reflecting off thousands of silversides. This swim-through also has many groupers and jacks that come to feed on the silversides. The wall has large stands of black coral and orange elephant ear and tube sponges. Pelagics such as eagle rays and sharks are frequently seen just off the wall.

Cracked Coral Head: This massive coral head rises 40' off the bottom. Several large swim-thruoughs make it look like it is cracked giving it the name.

Jeep Reef: This site named for a coral-encrusted jeep that sits near the mooring is in the middle of the Exumas Land & Sea Park and hosts a healthy population of fish. It is also one of the prettiest reefs you will ever see. Current that sweeps through this cut keeps the reef 's corals healthy.

Pillar Wall: One of many excellent wall dives. It starts at 30' and slopes to 50' before dropping 5,000' to the bottom. There are many caves and crevices. There is also a large colony of yellowhead jawfish in the rubble inside the reef.


Southwest Eleuthera

Cave Rock: A large coral mound in 50' of water surrounded by several smaller coral heads. There are several caves where you can swim from one side to the other. The large variety of corals and fish will amaze you. Hammerhead sharks have been seen here frequently.

Monolith: Large mounds of coral rise out of the sand at the edge of the wall. They start at 100' depth and rise to 55'. There is a colony of garden eels in the sand next to the mounds.
 

Little San Sal (Half Moon Cay)

Cave Reef: This 40' shallow patch reef has several large swim-throughs cutting in the middle of the reef.

Empress Pinnacles: This wall dive features 30' high pinnacles coming out of the sand at the edge of the wall. Pelagic animals are seen frequently in the clear water off the wall. There are large branches of black coral growing on the sides of the pinnacles.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
13 Sep 2025
8D/7N
[Nassau-Nassau] Exuma Cays and Southwest Eleuthera [13 Sep 25 - 20 Sep 25]
Exuma Cays The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over ...
See Itinerary

Exuma Cays

The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over 120 miles from just south of new Providence to the anchor islands of Great and Little Exuma to the south. The Exuma Cays are a part of the more remote Out Islands of the Bahamas. The Cays are the most exotic of these islands, a collection of sandy jewels set in the aquamarine and sapphire of some of the most beautiful waters in the world along with an intriguing combination of walls and rich shallow reefs.

Nassau

Lost Blue Hole: The rim of this large blue hole lies in 40' of water surrounded by coral heads, stingrays, and many schools of fish. There is a lobster filled crevice at 80'. In the sand surrounding the hole, divers find many small fish such as banded jawfish, Seminole gobies, and tobacco fish. There are usually one or two nurse sharks and during the spring a large school of blacknose sharks inhabits the bottom of the 200' hole.

Periwinkle Reef: This is a shallow patch-reef teaming with fish. The local Nassau tour operators feed fish here, so sergeant majors and angelfish approach scuba divers looking for a handout.

 

Exumas

Amberjack Reef: This 50' patch-reef that has prolific fish life including reef sharks and up to ten large groupers. This dive also has many interesting small critters such as pirate blennies and garden eels. During the safety stop divers may be surrounded by 100+ horse-eye jacks that school under the yacht.

Austin Smith Wreck: A 90' Bahamian Defense Force cutter lying in 60’ of water that, ironically, sank in 1995 while being towed to San Salvador to be sunk there as a dive site.

Barracuda Shoals: This bankside patch reef has huge schools of fish as well as many small critters on the reef and surrounding sand.

Blacktip Wall: Hammerhead sharks have been sighted frequently on this wall. This reef is also where Ned Deloach (the popular Reef Identification books co-author) discovered the rare Lemon goby.

Cathedral: This site is part of the Dog Rocks Reef. This reef starts at 35' and slopes off to 50' before dropping straight down into the Exuma Sound. The “cathedral” is a large swim-through where light filters down from above reflecting off thousands of silversides. This swim-through also has many groupers and jacks that come to feed on the silversides. The wall has large stands of black coral and orange elephant ear and tube sponges. Pelagics such as eagle rays and sharks are frequently seen just off the wall.

Cracked Coral Head: This massive coral head rises 40' off the bottom. Several large swim-thruoughs make it look like it is cracked giving it the name.

Jeep Reef: This site named for a coral-encrusted jeep that sits near the mooring is in the middle of the Exumas Land & Sea Park and hosts a healthy population of fish. It is also one of the prettiest reefs you will ever see. Current that sweeps through this cut keeps the reef 's corals healthy.

Pillar Wall: One of many excellent wall dives. It starts at 30' and slopes to 50' before dropping 5,000' to the bottom. There are many caves and crevices. There is also a large colony of yellowhead jawfish in the rubble inside the reef.


Southwest Eleuthera

Cave Rock: A large coral mound in 50' of water surrounded by several smaller coral heads. There are several caves where you can swim from one side to the other. The large variety of corals and fish will amaze you. Hammerhead sharks have been seen here frequently.

Monolith: Large mounds of coral rise out of the sand at the edge of the wall. They start at 100' depth and rise to 55'. There is a colony of garden eels in the sand next to the mounds.
 

Little San Sal (Half Moon Cay)

Cave Reef: This 40' shallow patch reef has several large swim-throughs cutting in the middle of the reef.

Empress Pinnacles: This wall dive features 30' high pinnacles coming out of the sand at the edge of the wall. Pelagic animals are seen frequently in the clear water off the wall. There are large branches of black coral growing on the sides of the pinnacles.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
20 Sep 2025
8D/7N
[Nassau-Nassau] Exuma Cays and Southwest Eleuthera [20 Sep 25 - 27 Sep 25]
Exuma Cays The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over ...
See Itinerary

Exuma Cays

The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over 120 miles from just south of new Providence to the anchor islands of Great and Little Exuma to the south. The Exuma Cays are a part of the more remote Out Islands of the Bahamas. The Cays are the most exotic of these islands, a collection of sandy jewels set in the aquamarine and sapphire of some of the most beautiful waters in the world along with an intriguing combination of walls and rich shallow reefs.

Nassau

Lost Blue Hole: The rim of this large blue hole lies in 40' of water surrounded by coral heads, stingrays, and many schools of fish. There is a lobster filled crevice at 80'. In the sand surrounding the hole, divers find many small fish such as banded jawfish, Seminole gobies, and tobacco fish. There are usually one or two nurse sharks and during the spring a large school of blacknose sharks inhabits the bottom of the 200' hole.

Periwinkle Reef: This is a shallow patch-reef teaming with fish. The local Nassau tour operators feed fish here, so sergeant majors and angelfish approach scuba divers looking for a handout.

 

Exumas

Amberjack Reef: This 50' patch-reef that has prolific fish life including reef sharks and up to ten large groupers. This dive also has many interesting small critters such as pirate blennies and garden eels. During the safety stop divers may be surrounded by 100+ horse-eye jacks that school under the yacht.

Austin Smith Wreck: A 90' Bahamian Defense Force cutter lying in 60’ of water that, ironically, sank in 1995 while being towed to San Salvador to be sunk there as a dive site.

Barracuda Shoals: This bankside patch reef has huge schools of fish as well as many small critters on the reef and surrounding sand.

Blacktip Wall: Hammerhead sharks have been sighted frequently on this wall. This reef is also where Ned Deloach (the popular Reef Identification books co-author) discovered the rare Lemon goby.

Cathedral: This site is part of the Dog Rocks Reef. This reef starts at 35' and slopes off to 50' before dropping straight down into the Exuma Sound. The “cathedral” is a large swim-through where light filters down from above reflecting off thousands of silversides. This swim-through also has many groupers and jacks that come to feed on the silversides. The wall has large stands of black coral and orange elephant ear and tube sponges. Pelagics such as eagle rays and sharks are frequently seen just off the wall.

Cracked Coral Head: This massive coral head rises 40' off the bottom. Several large swim-thruoughs make it look like it is cracked giving it the name.

Jeep Reef: This site named for a coral-encrusted jeep that sits near the mooring is in the middle of the Exumas Land & Sea Park and hosts a healthy population of fish. It is also one of the prettiest reefs you will ever see. Current that sweeps through this cut keeps the reef 's corals healthy.

Pillar Wall: One of many excellent wall dives. It starts at 30' and slopes to 50' before dropping 5,000' to the bottom. There are many caves and crevices. There is also a large colony of yellowhead jawfish in the rubble inside the reef.


Southwest Eleuthera

Cave Rock: A large coral mound in 50' of water surrounded by several smaller coral heads. There are several caves where you can swim from one side to the other. The large variety of corals and fish will amaze you. Hammerhead sharks have been seen here frequently.

Monolith: Large mounds of coral rise out of the sand at the edge of the wall. They start at 100' depth and rise to 55'. There is a colony of garden eels in the sand next to the mounds.
 

Little San Sal (Half Moon Cay)

Cave Reef: This 40' shallow patch reef has several large swim-throughs cutting in the middle of the reef.

Empress Pinnacles: This wall dive features 30' high pinnacles coming out of the sand at the edge of the wall. Pelagic animals are seen frequently in the clear water off the wall. There are large branches of black coral growing on the sides of the pinnacles.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
27 Sep 2025
8D/7N
[Nassau-Nassau] Exuma Cays and Southwest Eleuthera [27 Sep 25 - 04 Oct 25]
Exuma Cays The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over ...
See Itinerary

Exuma Cays

The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over 120 miles from just south of new Providence to the anchor islands of Great and Little Exuma to the south. The Exuma Cays are a part of the more remote Out Islands of the Bahamas. The Cays are the most exotic of these islands, a collection of sandy jewels set in the aquamarine and sapphire of some of the most beautiful waters in the world along with an intriguing combination of walls and rich shallow reefs.

Nassau

Lost Blue Hole: The rim of this large blue hole lies in 40' of water surrounded by coral heads, stingrays, and many schools of fish. There is a lobster filled crevice at 80'. In the sand surrounding the hole, divers find many small fish such as banded jawfish, Seminole gobies, and tobacco fish. There are usually one or two nurse sharks and during the spring a large school of blacknose sharks inhabits the bottom of the 200' hole.

Periwinkle Reef: This is a shallow patch-reef teaming with fish. The local Nassau tour operators feed fish here, so sergeant majors and angelfish approach scuba divers looking for a handout.

 

Exumas

Amberjack Reef: This 50' patch-reef that has prolific fish life including reef sharks and up to ten large groupers. This dive also has many interesting small critters such as pirate blennies and garden eels. During the safety stop divers may be surrounded by 100+ horse-eye jacks that school under the yacht.

Austin Smith Wreck: A 90' Bahamian Defense Force cutter lying in 60’ of water that, ironically, sank in 1995 while being towed to San Salvador to be sunk there as a dive site.

Barracuda Shoals: This bankside patch reef has huge schools of fish as well as many small critters on the reef and surrounding sand.

Blacktip Wall: Hammerhead sharks have been sighted frequently on this wall. This reef is also where Ned Deloach (the popular Reef Identification books co-author) discovered the rare Lemon goby.

Cathedral: This site is part of the Dog Rocks Reef. This reef starts at 35' and slopes off to 50' before dropping straight down into the Exuma Sound. The “cathedral” is a large swim-through where light filters down from above reflecting off thousands of silversides. This swim-through also has many groupers and jacks that come to feed on the silversides. The wall has large stands of black coral and orange elephant ear and tube sponges. Pelagics such as eagle rays and sharks are frequently seen just off the wall.

Cracked Coral Head: This massive coral head rises 40' off the bottom. Several large swim-thruoughs make it look like it is cracked giving it the name.

Jeep Reef: This site named for a coral-encrusted jeep that sits near the mooring is in the middle of the Exumas Land & Sea Park and hosts a healthy population of fish. It is also one of the prettiest reefs you will ever see. Current that sweeps through this cut keeps the reef 's corals healthy.

Pillar Wall: One of many excellent wall dives. It starts at 30' and slopes to 50' before dropping 5,000' to the bottom. There are many caves and crevices. There is also a large colony of yellowhead jawfish in the rubble inside the reef.


Southwest Eleuthera

Cave Rock: A large coral mound in 50' of water surrounded by several smaller coral heads. There are several caves where you can swim from one side to the other. The large variety of corals and fish will amaze you. Hammerhead sharks have been seen here frequently.

Monolith: Large mounds of coral rise out of the sand at the edge of the wall. They start at 100' depth and rise to 55'. There is a colony of garden eels in the sand next to the mounds.
 

Little San Sal (Half Moon Cay)

Cave Reef: This 40' shallow patch reef has several large swim-throughs cutting in the middle of the reef.

Empress Pinnacles: This wall dive features 30' high pinnacles coming out of the sand at the edge of the wall. Pelagic animals are seen frequently in the clear water off the wall. There are large branches of black coral growing on the sides of the pinnacles.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
04 Oct 2025
8D/7N
[Nassau-Nassau] Exuma Cays and Southwest Eleuthera [04 Oct 25 - 11 Oct 25]
Exuma Cays The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over ...
See Itinerary

Exuma Cays

The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over 120 miles from just south of new Providence to the anchor islands of Great and Little Exuma to the south. The Exuma Cays are a part of the more remote Out Islands of the Bahamas. The Cays are the most exotic of these islands, a collection of sandy jewels set in the aquamarine and sapphire of some of the most beautiful waters in the world along with an intriguing combination of walls and rich shallow reefs.

Nassau

Lost Blue Hole: The rim of this large blue hole lies in 40' of water surrounded by coral heads, stingrays, and many schools of fish. There is a lobster filled crevice at 80'. In the sand surrounding the hole, divers find many small fish such as banded jawfish, Seminole gobies, and tobacco fish. There are usually one or two nurse sharks and during the spring a large school of blacknose sharks inhabits the bottom of the 200' hole.

Periwinkle Reef: This is a shallow patch-reef teaming with fish. The local Nassau tour operators feed fish here, so sergeant majors and angelfish approach scuba divers looking for a handout.

 

Exumas

Amberjack Reef: This 50' patch-reef that has prolific fish life including reef sharks and up to ten large groupers. This dive also has many interesting small critters such as pirate blennies and garden eels. During the safety stop divers may be surrounded by 100+ horse-eye jacks that school under the yacht.

Austin Smith Wreck: A 90' Bahamian Defense Force cutter lying in 60’ of water that, ironically, sank in 1995 while being towed to San Salvador to be sunk there as a dive site.

Barracuda Shoals: This bankside patch reef has huge schools of fish as well as many small critters on the reef and surrounding sand.

Blacktip Wall: Hammerhead sharks have been sighted frequently on this wall. This reef is also where Ned Deloach (the popular Reef Identification books co-author) discovered the rare Lemon goby.

Cathedral: This site is part of the Dog Rocks Reef. This reef starts at 35' and slopes off to 50' before dropping straight down into the Exuma Sound. The “cathedral” is a large swim-through where light filters down from above reflecting off thousands of silversides. This swim-through also has many groupers and jacks that come to feed on the silversides. The wall has large stands of black coral and orange elephant ear and tube sponges. Pelagics such as eagle rays and sharks are frequently seen just off the wall.

Cracked Coral Head: This massive coral head rises 40' off the bottom. Several large swim-thruoughs make it look like it is cracked giving it the name.

Jeep Reef: This site named for a coral-encrusted jeep that sits near the mooring is in the middle of the Exumas Land & Sea Park and hosts a healthy population of fish. It is also one of the prettiest reefs you will ever see. Current that sweeps through this cut keeps the reef 's corals healthy.

Pillar Wall: One of many excellent wall dives. It starts at 30' and slopes to 50' before dropping 5,000' to the bottom. There are many caves and crevices. There is also a large colony of yellowhead jawfish in the rubble inside the reef.


Southwest Eleuthera

Cave Rock: A large coral mound in 50' of water surrounded by several smaller coral heads. There are several caves where you can swim from one side to the other. The large variety of corals and fish will amaze you. Hammerhead sharks have been seen here frequently.

Monolith: Large mounds of coral rise out of the sand at the edge of the wall. They start at 100' depth and rise to 55'. There is a colony of garden eels in the sand next to the mounds.
 

Little San Sal (Half Moon Cay)

Cave Reef: This 40' shallow patch reef has several large swim-throughs cutting in the middle of the reef.

Empress Pinnacles: This wall dive features 30' high pinnacles coming out of the sand at the edge of the wall. Pelagic animals are seen frequently in the clear water off the wall. There are large branches of black coral growing on the sides of the pinnacles.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
11 Oct 2025
8D/7N
[Nassau-Nassau] Exuma Cays and Southwest Eleuthera [11 Oct 25 - 18 Oct 25]
Exuma Cays The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over ...
See Itinerary

Exuma Cays

The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over 120 miles from just south of new Providence to the anchor islands of Great and Little Exuma to the south. The Exuma Cays are a part of the more remote Out Islands of the Bahamas. The Cays are the most exotic of these islands, a collection of sandy jewels set in the aquamarine and sapphire of some of the most beautiful waters in the world along with an intriguing combination of walls and rich shallow reefs.

Nassau

Lost Blue Hole: The rim of this large blue hole lies in 40' of water surrounded by coral heads, stingrays, and many schools of fish. There is a lobster filled crevice at 80'. In the sand surrounding the hole, divers find many small fish such as banded jawfish, Seminole gobies, and tobacco fish. There are usually one or two nurse sharks and during the spring a large school of blacknose sharks inhabits the bottom of the 200' hole.

Periwinkle Reef: This is a shallow patch-reef teaming with fish. The local Nassau tour operators feed fish here, so sergeant majors and angelfish approach scuba divers looking for a handout.

 

Exumas

Amberjack Reef: This 50' patch-reef that has prolific fish life including reef sharks and up to ten large groupers. This dive also has many interesting small critters such as pirate blennies and garden eels. During the safety stop divers may be surrounded by 100+ horse-eye jacks that school under the yacht.

Austin Smith Wreck: A 90' Bahamian Defense Force cutter lying in 60’ of water that, ironically, sank in 1995 while being towed to San Salvador to be sunk there as a dive site.

Barracuda Shoals: This bankside patch reef has huge schools of fish as well as many small critters on the reef and surrounding sand.

Blacktip Wall: Hammerhead sharks have been sighted frequently on this wall. This reef is also where Ned Deloach (the popular Reef Identification books co-author) discovered the rare Lemon goby.

Cathedral: This site is part of the Dog Rocks Reef. This reef starts at 35' and slopes off to 50' before dropping straight down into the Exuma Sound. The “cathedral” is a large swim-through where light filters down from above reflecting off thousands of silversides. This swim-through also has many groupers and jacks that come to feed on the silversides. The wall has large stands of black coral and orange elephant ear and tube sponges. Pelagics such as eagle rays and sharks are frequently seen just off the wall.

Cracked Coral Head: This massive coral head rises 40' off the bottom. Several large swim-thruoughs make it look like it is cracked giving it the name.

Jeep Reef: This site named for a coral-encrusted jeep that sits near the mooring is in the middle of the Exumas Land & Sea Park and hosts a healthy population of fish. It is also one of the prettiest reefs you will ever see. Current that sweeps through this cut keeps the reef 's corals healthy.

Pillar Wall: One of many excellent wall dives. It starts at 30' and slopes to 50' before dropping 5,000' to the bottom. There are many caves and crevices. There is also a large colony of yellowhead jawfish in the rubble inside the reef.


Southwest Eleuthera

Cave Rock: A large coral mound in 50' of water surrounded by several smaller coral heads. There are several caves where you can swim from one side to the other. The large variety of corals and fish will amaze you. Hammerhead sharks have been seen here frequently.

Monolith: Large mounds of coral rise out of the sand at the edge of the wall. They start at 100' depth and rise to 55'. There is a colony of garden eels in the sand next to the mounds.
 

Little San Sal (Half Moon Cay)

Cave Reef: This 40' shallow patch reef has several large swim-throughs cutting in the middle of the reef.

Empress Pinnacles: This wall dive features 30' high pinnacles coming out of the sand at the edge of the wall. Pelagic animals are seen frequently in the clear water off the wall. There are large branches of black coral growing on the sides of the pinnacles.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
18 Oct 2025
8D/7N
[Nassau-Nassau] Exuma Cays and Southwest Eleuthera [18 Oct 25 - 25 Oct 25]
Exuma Cays The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over ...
See Itinerary

Exuma Cays

The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over 120 miles from just south of new Providence to the anchor islands of Great and Little Exuma to the south. The Exuma Cays are a part of the more remote Out Islands of the Bahamas. The Cays are the most exotic of these islands, a collection of sandy jewels set in the aquamarine and sapphire of some of the most beautiful waters in the world along with an intriguing combination of walls and rich shallow reefs.

Nassau

Lost Blue Hole: The rim of this large blue hole lies in 40' of water surrounded by coral heads, stingrays, and many schools of fish. There is a lobster filled crevice at 80'. In the sand surrounding the hole, divers find many small fish such as banded jawfish, Seminole gobies, and tobacco fish. There are usually one or two nurse sharks and during the spring a large school of blacknose sharks inhabits the bottom of the 200' hole.

Periwinkle Reef: This is a shallow patch-reef teaming with fish. The local Nassau tour operators feed fish here, so sergeant majors and angelfish approach scuba divers looking for a handout.

 

Exumas

Amberjack Reef: This 50' patch-reef that has prolific fish life including reef sharks and up to ten large groupers. This dive also has many interesting small critters such as pirate blennies and garden eels. During the safety stop divers may be surrounded by 100+ horse-eye jacks that school under the yacht.

Austin Smith Wreck: A 90' Bahamian Defense Force cutter lying in 60’ of water that, ironically, sank in 1995 while being towed to San Salvador to be sunk there as a dive site.

Barracuda Shoals: This bankside patch reef has huge schools of fish as well as many small critters on the reef and surrounding sand.

Blacktip Wall: Hammerhead sharks have been sighted frequently on this wall. This reef is also where Ned Deloach (the popular Reef Identification books co-author) discovered the rare Lemon goby.

Cathedral: This site is part of the Dog Rocks Reef. This reef starts at 35' and slopes off to 50' before dropping straight down into the Exuma Sound. The “cathedral” is a large swim-through where light filters down from above reflecting off thousands of silversides. This swim-through also has many groupers and jacks that come to feed on the silversides. The wall has large stands of black coral and orange elephant ear and tube sponges. Pelagics such as eagle rays and sharks are frequently seen just off the wall.

Cracked Coral Head: This massive coral head rises 40' off the bottom. Several large swim-thruoughs make it look like it is cracked giving it the name.

Jeep Reef: This site named for a coral-encrusted jeep that sits near the mooring is in the middle of the Exumas Land & Sea Park and hosts a healthy population of fish. It is also one of the prettiest reefs you will ever see. Current that sweeps through this cut keeps the reef 's corals healthy.

Pillar Wall: One of many excellent wall dives. It starts at 30' and slopes to 50' before dropping 5,000' to the bottom. There are many caves and crevices. There is also a large colony of yellowhead jawfish in the rubble inside the reef.


Southwest Eleuthera

Cave Rock: A large coral mound in 50' of water surrounded by several smaller coral heads. There are several caves where you can swim from one side to the other. The large variety of corals and fish will amaze you. Hammerhead sharks have been seen here frequently.

Monolith: Large mounds of coral rise out of the sand at the edge of the wall. They start at 100' depth and rise to 55'. There is a colony of garden eels in the sand next to the mounds.
 

Little San Sal (Half Moon Cay)

Cave Reef: This 40' shallow patch reef has several large swim-throughs cutting in the middle of the reef.

Empress Pinnacles: This wall dive features 30' high pinnacles coming out of the sand at the edge of the wall. Pelagic animals are seen frequently in the clear water off the wall. There are large branches of black coral growing on the sides of the pinnacles.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
25 Oct 2025
8D/7N
[Nassau-Nassau] Exuma Cays and Southwest Eleuthera [25 Oct 25 - 01 Nov 25]
Exuma Cays The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over ...
See Itinerary

Exuma Cays

The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over 120 miles from just south of new Providence to the anchor islands of Great and Little Exuma to the south. The Exuma Cays are a part of the more remote Out Islands of the Bahamas. The Cays are the most exotic of these islands, a collection of sandy jewels set in the aquamarine and sapphire of some of the most beautiful waters in the world along with an intriguing combination of walls and rich shallow reefs.

Nassau

Lost Blue Hole: The rim of this large blue hole lies in 40' of water surrounded by coral heads, stingrays, and many schools of fish. There is a lobster filled crevice at 80'. In the sand surrounding the hole, divers find many small fish such as banded jawfish, Seminole gobies, and tobacco fish. There are usually one or two nurse sharks and during the spring a large school of blacknose sharks inhabits the bottom of the 200' hole.

Periwinkle Reef: This is a shallow patch-reef teaming with fish. The local Nassau tour operators feed fish here, so sergeant majors and angelfish approach scuba divers looking for a handout.

 

Exumas

Amberjack Reef: This 50' patch-reef that has prolific fish life including reef sharks and up to ten large groupers. This dive also has many interesting small critters such as pirate blennies and garden eels. During the safety stop divers may be surrounded by 100+ horse-eye jacks that school under the yacht.

Austin Smith Wreck: A 90' Bahamian Defense Force cutter lying in 60’ of water that, ironically, sank in 1995 while being towed to San Salvador to be sunk there as a dive site.

Barracuda Shoals: This bankside patch reef has huge schools of fish as well as many small critters on the reef and surrounding sand.

Blacktip Wall: Hammerhead sharks have been sighted frequently on this wall. This reef is also where Ned Deloach (the popular Reef Identification books co-author) discovered the rare Lemon goby.

Cathedral: This site is part of the Dog Rocks Reef. This reef starts at 35' and slopes off to 50' before dropping straight down into the Exuma Sound. The “cathedral” is a large swim-through where light filters down from above reflecting off thousands of silversides. This swim-through also has many groupers and jacks that come to feed on the silversides. The wall has large stands of black coral and orange elephant ear and tube sponges. Pelagics such as eagle rays and sharks are frequently seen just off the wall.

Cracked Coral Head: This massive coral head rises 40' off the bottom. Several large swim-thruoughs make it look like it is cracked giving it the name.

Jeep Reef: This site named for a coral-encrusted jeep that sits near the mooring is in the middle of the Exumas Land & Sea Park and hosts a healthy population of fish. It is also one of the prettiest reefs you will ever see. Current that sweeps through this cut keeps the reef 's corals healthy.

Pillar Wall: One of many excellent wall dives. It starts at 30' and slopes to 50' before dropping 5,000' to the bottom. There are many caves and crevices. There is also a large colony of yellowhead jawfish in the rubble inside the reef.


Southwest Eleuthera

Cave Rock: A large coral mound in 50' of water surrounded by several smaller coral heads. There are several caves where you can swim from one side to the other. The large variety of corals and fish will amaze you. Hammerhead sharks have been seen here frequently.

Monolith: Large mounds of coral rise out of the sand at the edge of the wall. They start at 100' depth and rise to 55'. There is a colony of garden eels in the sand next to the mounds.
 

Little San Sal (Half Moon Cay)

Cave Reef: This 40' shallow patch reef has several large swim-throughs cutting in the middle of the reef.

Empress Pinnacles: This wall dive features 30' high pinnacles coming out of the sand at the edge of the wall. Pelagic animals are seen frequently in the clear water off the wall. There are large branches of black coral growing on the sides of the pinnacles.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
01 Nov 2025
8D/7N
[Nassau-Nassau] Exuma Cays and Southwest Eleuthera [01 Nov 25 - 08 Nov 25]
Exuma Cays The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over ...
See Itinerary

Exuma Cays

The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over 120 miles from just south of new Providence to the anchor islands of Great and Little Exuma to the south. The Exuma Cays are a part of the more remote Out Islands of the Bahamas. The Cays are the most exotic of these islands, a collection of sandy jewels set in the aquamarine and sapphire of some of the most beautiful waters in the world along with an intriguing combination of walls and rich shallow reefs.

Nassau

Lost Blue Hole: The rim of this large blue hole lies in 40' of water surrounded by coral heads, stingrays, and many schools of fish. There is a lobster filled crevice at 80'. In the sand surrounding the hole, divers find many small fish such as banded jawfish, Seminole gobies, and tobacco fish. There are usually one or two nurse sharks and during the spring a large school of blacknose sharks inhabits the bottom of the 200' hole.

Periwinkle Reef: This is a shallow patch-reef teaming with fish. The local Nassau tour operators feed fish here, so sergeant majors and angelfish approach scuba divers looking for a handout.

 

Exumas

Amberjack Reef: This 50' patch-reef that has prolific fish life including reef sharks and up to ten large groupers. This dive also has many interesting small critters such as pirate blennies and garden eels. During the safety stop divers may be surrounded by 100+ horse-eye jacks that school under the yacht.

Austin Smith Wreck: A 90' Bahamian Defense Force cutter lying in 60’ of water that, ironically, sank in 1995 while being towed to San Salvador to be sunk there as a dive site.

Barracuda Shoals: This bankside patch reef has huge schools of fish as well as many small critters on the reef and surrounding sand.

Blacktip Wall: Hammerhead sharks have been sighted frequently on this wall. This reef is also where Ned Deloach (the popular Reef Identification books co-author) discovered the rare Lemon goby.

Cathedral: This site is part of the Dog Rocks Reef. This reef starts at 35' and slopes off to 50' before dropping straight down into the Exuma Sound. The “cathedral” is a large swim-through where light filters down from above reflecting off thousands of silversides. This swim-through also has many groupers and jacks that come to feed on the silversides. The wall has large stands of black coral and orange elephant ear and tube sponges. Pelagics such as eagle rays and sharks are frequently seen just off the wall.

Cracked Coral Head: This massive coral head rises 40' off the bottom. Several large swim-thruoughs make it look like it is cracked giving it the name.

Jeep Reef: This site named for a coral-encrusted jeep that sits near the mooring is in the middle of the Exumas Land & Sea Park and hosts a healthy population of fish. It is also one of the prettiest reefs you will ever see. Current that sweeps through this cut keeps the reef 's corals healthy.

Pillar Wall: One of many excellent wall dives. It starts at 30' and slopes to 50' before dropping 5,000' to the bottom. There are many caves and crevices. There is also a large colony of yellowhead jawfish in the rubble inside the reef.


Southwest Eleuthera

Cave Rock: A large coral mound in 50' of water surrounded by several smaller coral heads. There are several caves where you can swim from one side to the other. The large variety of corals and fish will amaze you. Hammerhead sharks have been seen here frequently.

Monolith: Large mounds of coral rise out of the sand at the edge of the wall. They start at 100' depth and rise to 55'. There is a colony of garden eels in the sand next to the mounds.
 

Little San Sal (Half Moon Cay)

Cave Reef: This 40' shallow patch reef has several large swim-throughs cutting in the middle of the reef.

Empress Pinnacles: This wall dive features 30' high pinnacles coming out of the sand at the edge of the wall. Pelagic animals are seen frequently in the clear water off the wall. There are large branches of black coral growing on the sides of the pinnacles.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
08 Nov 2025
8D/7N
[Nassau-Nassau] Exuma Cays and Southwest Eleuthera [08 Nov 25 - 15 Nov 25]
Exuma Cays The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over ...
See Itinerary

Exuma Cays

The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over 120 miles from just south of new Providence to the anchor islands of Great and Little Exuma to the south. The Exuma Cays are a part of the more remote Out Islands of the Bahamas. The Cays are the most exotic of these islands, a collection of sandy jewels set in the aquamarine and sapphire of some of the most beautiful waters in the world along with an intriguing combination of walls and rich shallow reefs.

Nassau

Lost Blue Hole: The rim of this large blue hole lies in 40' of water surrounded by coral heads, stingrays, and many schools of fish. There is a lobster filled crevice at 80'. In the sand surrounding the hole, divers find many small fish such as banded jawfish, Seminole gobies, and tobacco fish. There are usually one or two nurse sharks and during the spring a large school of blacknose sharks inhabits the bottom of the 200' hole.

Periwinkle Reef: This is a shallow patch-reef teaming with fish. The local Nassau tour operators feed fish here, so sergeant majors and angelfish approach scuba divers looking for a handout.

 

Exumas

Amberjack Reef: This 50' patch-reef that has prolific fish life including reef sharks and up to ten large groupers. This dive also has many interesting small critters such as pirate blennies and garden eels. During the safety stop divers may be surrounded by 100+ horse-eye jacks that school under the yacht.

Austin Smith Wreck: A 90' Bahamian Defense Force cutter lying in 60’ of water that, ironically, sank in 1995 while being towed to San Salvador to be sunk there as a dive site.

Barracuda Shoals: This bankside patch reef has huge schools of fish as well as many small critters on the reef and surrounding sand.

Blacktip Wall: Hammerhead sharks have been sighted frequently on this wall. This reef is also where Ned Deloach (the popular Reef Identification books co-author) discovered the rare Lemon goby.

Cathedral: This site is part of the Dog Rocks Reef. This reef starts at 35' and slopes off to 50' before dropping straight down into the Exuma Sound. The “cathedral” is a large swim-through where light filters down from above reflecting off thousands of silversides. This swim-through also has many groupers and jacks that come to feed on the silversides. The wall has large stands of black coral and orange elephant ear and tube sponges. Pelagics such as eagle rays and sharks are frequently seen just off the wall.

Cracked Coral Head: This massive coral head rises 40' off the bottom. Several large swim-thruoughs make it look like it is cracked giving it the name.

Jeep Reef: This site named for a coral-encrusted jeep that sits near the mooring is in the middle of the Exumas Land & Sea Park and hosts a healthy population of fish. It is also one of the prettiest reefs you will ever see. Current that sweeps through this cut keeps the reef 's corals healthy.

Pillar Wall: One of many excellent wall dives. It starts at 30' and slopes to 50' before dropping 5,000' to the bottom. There are many caves and crevices. There is also a large colony of yellowhead jawfish in the rubble inside the reef.


Southwest Eleuthera

Cave Rock: A large coral mound in 50' of water surrounded by several smaller coral heads. There are several caves where you can swim from one side to the other. The large variety of corals and fish will amaze you. Hammerhead sharks have been seen here frequently.

Monolith: Large mounds of coral rise out of the sand at the edge of the wall. They start at 100' depth and rise to 55'. There is a colony of garden eels in the sand next to the mounds.
 

Little San Sal (Half Moon Cay)

Cave Reef: This 40' shallow patch reef has several large swim-throughs cutting in the middle of the reef.

Empress Pinnacles: This wall dive features 30' high pinnacles coming out of the sand at the edge of the wall. Pelagic animals are seen frequently in the clear water off the wall. There are large branches of black coral growing on the sides of the pinnacles.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
15 Nov 2025
8D/7N
[Nassau-Nassau] Exuma Cays and Southwest Eleuthera [15 Nov 25 - 22 Nov 25]
Exuma Cays The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over ...
See Itinerary

Exuma Cays

The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over 120 miles from just south of new Providence to the anchor islands of Great and Little Exuma to the south. The Exuma Cays are a part of the more remote Out Islands of the Bahamas. The Cays are the most exotic of these islands, a collection of sandy jewels set in the aquamarine and sapphire of some of the most beautiful waters in the world along with an intriguing combination of walls and rich shallow reefs.

Nassau

Lost Blue Hole: The rim of this large blue hole lies in 40' of water surrounded by coral heads, stingrays, and many schools of fish. There is a lobster filled crevice at 80'. In the sand surrounding the hole, divers find many small fish such as banded jawfish, Seminole gobies, and tobacco fish. There are usually one or two nurse sharks and during the spring a large school of blacknose sharks inhabits the bottom of the 200' hole.

Periwinkle Reef: This is a shallow patch-reef teaming with fish. The local Nassau tour operators feed fish here, so sergeant majors and angelfish approach scuba divers looking for a handout.

 

Exumas

Amberjack Reef: This 50' patch-reef that has prolific fish life including reef sharks and up to ten large groupers. This dive also has many interesting small critters such as pirate blennies and garden eels. During the safety stop divers may be surrounded by 100+ horse-eye jacks that school under the yacht.

Austin Smith Wreck: A 90' Bahamian Defense Force cutter lying in 60’ of water that, ironically, sank in 1995 while being towed to San Salvador to be sunk there as a dive site.

Barracuda Shoals: This bankside patch reef has huge schools of fish as well as many small critters on the reef and surrounding sand.

Blacktip Wall: Hammerhead sharks have been sighted frequently on this wall. This reef is also where Ned Deloach (the popular Reef Identification books co-author) discovered the rare Lemon goby.

Cathedral: This site is part of the Dog Rocks Reef. This reef starts at 35' and slopes off to 50' before dropping straight down into the Exuma Sound. The “cathedral” is a large swim-through where light filters down from above reflecting off thousands of silversides. This swim-through also has many groupers and jacks that come to feed on the silversides. The wall has large stands of black coral and orange elephant ear and tube sponges. Pelagics such as eagle rays and sharks are frequently seen just off the wall.

Cracked Coral Head: This massive coral head rises 40' off the bottom. Several large swim-thruoughs make it look like it is cracked giving it the name.

Jeep Reef: This site named for a coral-encrusted jeep that sits near the mooring is in the middle of the Exumas Land & Sea Park and hosts a healthy population of fish. It is also one of the prettiest reefs you will ever see. Current that sweeps through this cut keeps the reef 's corals healthy.

Pillar Wall: One of many excellent wall dives. It starts at 30' and slopes to 50' before dropping 5,000' to the bottom. There are many caves and crevices. There is also a large colony of yellowhead jawfish in the rubble inside the reef.


Southwest Eleuthera

Cave Rock: A large coral mound in 50' of water surrounded by several smaller coral heads. There are several caves where you can swim from one side to the other. The large variety of corals and fish will amaze you. Hammerhead sharks have been seen here frequently.

Monolith: Large mounds of coral rise out of the sand at the edge of the wall. They start at 100' depth and rise to 55'. There is a colony of garden eels in the sand next to the mounds.
 

Little San Sal (Half Moon Cay)

Cave Reef: This 40' shallow patch reef has several large swim-throughs cutting in the middle of the reef.

Empress Pinnacles: This wall dive features 30' high pinnacles coming out of the sand at the edge of the wall. Pelagic animals are seen frequently in the clear water off the wall. There are large branches of black coral growing on the sides of the pinnacles.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
22 Nov 2025
8D/7N
[Nassau-Nassau] Exuma Cays and Southwest Eleuthera [22 Nov 25 - 29 Nov 25]
Exuma Cays The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over ...
See Itinerary

Exuma Cays

The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over 120 miles from just south of new Providence to the anchor islands of Great and Little Exuma to the south. The Exuma Cays are a part of the more remote Out Islands of the Bahamas. The Cays are the most exotic of these islands, a collection of sandy jewels set in the aquamarine and sapphire of some of the most beautiful waters in the world along with an intriguing combination of walls and rich shallow reefs.

Nassau

Lost Blue Hole: The rim of this large blue hole lies in 40' of water surrounded by coral heads, stingrays, and many schools of fish. There is a lobster filled crevice at 80'. In the sand surrounding the hole, divers find many small fish such as banded jawfish, Seminole gobies, and tobacco fish. There are usually one or two nurse sharks and during the spring a large school of blacknose sharks inhabits the bottom of the 200' hole.

Periwinkle Reef: This is a shallow patch-reef teaming with fish. The local Nassau tour operators feed fish here, so sergeant majors and angelfish approach scuba divers looking for a handout.

 

Exumas

Amberjack Reef: This 50' patch-reef that has prolific fish life including reef sharks and up to ten large groupers. This dive also has many interesting small critters such as pirate blennies and garden eels. During the safety stop divers may be surrounded by 100+ horse-eye jacks that school under the yacht.

Austin Smith Wreck: A 90' Bahamian Defense Force cutter lying in 60’ of water that, ironically, sank in 1995 while being towed to San Salvador to be sunk there as a dive site.

Barracuda Shoals: This bankside patch reef has huge schools of fish as well as many small critters on the reef and surrounding sand.

Blacktip Wall: Hammerhead sharks have been sighted frequently on this wall. This reef is also where Ned Deloach (the popular Reef Identification books co-author) discovered the rare Lemon goby.

Cathedral: This site is part of the Dog Rocks Reef. This reef starts at 35' and slopes off to 50' before dropping straight down into the Exuma Sound. The “cathedral” is a large swim-through where light filters down from above reflecting off thousands of silversides. This swim-through also has many groupers and jacks that come to feed on the silversides. The wall has large stands of black coral and orange elephant ear and tube sponges. Pelagics such as eagle rays and sharks are frequently seen just off the wall.

Cracked Coral Head: This massive coral head rises 40' off the bottom. Several large swim-thruoughs make it look like it is cracked giving it the name.

Jeep Reef: This site named for a coral-encrusted jeep that sits near the mooring is in the middle of the Exumas Land & Sea Park and hosts a healthy population of fish. It is also one of the prettiest reefs you will ever see. Current that sweeps through this cut keeps the reef 's corals healthy.

Pillar Wall: One of many excellent wall dives. It starts at 30' and slopes to 50' before dropping 5,000' to the bottom. There are many caves and crevices. There is also a large colony of yellowhead jawfish in the rubble inside the reef.


Southwest Eleuthera

Cave Rock: A large coral mound in 50' of water surrounded by several smaller coral heads. There are several caves where you can swim from one side to the other. The large variety of corals and fish will amaze you. Hammerhead sharks have been seen here frequently.

Monolith: Large mounds of coral rise out of the sand at the edge of the wall. They start at 100' depth and rise to 55'. There is a colony of garden eels in the sand next to the mounds.
 

Little San Sal (Half Moon Cay)

Cave Reef: This 40' shallow patch reef has several large swim-throughs cutting in the middle of the reef.

Empress Pinnacles: This wall dive features 30' high pinnacles coming out of the sand at the edge of the wall. Pelagic animals are seen frequently in the clear water off the wall. There are large branches of black coral growing on the sides of the pinnacles.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
29 Nov 2025
8D/7N
[Nassau-Nassau] Exuma Cays and Southwest Eleuthera [29 Nov 25 - 06 Dec 25]
Exuma Cays The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over ...
See Itinerary

Exuma Cays

The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over 120 miles from just south of new Providence to the anchor islands of Great and Little Exuma to the south. The Exuma Cays are a part of the more remote Out Islands of the Bahamas. The Cays are the most exotic of these islands, a collection of sandy jewels set in the aquamarine and sapphire of some of the most beautiful waters in the world along with an intriguing combination of walls and rich shallow reefs.

Nassau

Lost Blue Hole: The rim of this large blue hole lies in 40' of water surrounded by coral heads, stingrays, and many schools of fish. There is a lobster filled crevice at 80'. In the sand surrounding the hole, divers find many small fish such as banded jawfish, Seminole gobies, and tobacco fish. There are usually one or two nurse sharks and during the spring a large school of blacknose sharks inhabits the bottom of the 200' hole.

Periwinkle Reef: This is a shallow patch-reef teaming with fish. The local Nassau tour operators feed fish here, so sergeant majors and angelfish approach scuba divers looking for a handout.

 

Exumas

Amberjack Reef: This 50' patch-reef that has prolific fish life including reef sharks and up to ten large groupers. This dive also has many interesting small critters such as pirate blennies and garden eels. During the safety stop divers may be surrounded by 100+ horse-eye jacks that school under the yacht.

Austin Smith Wreck: A 90' Bahamian Defense Force cutter lying in 60’ of water that, ironically, sank in 1995 while being towed to San Salvador to be sunk there as a dive site.

Barracuda Shoals: This bankside patch reef has huge schools of fish as well as many small critters on the reef and surrounding sand.

Blacktip Wall: Hammerhead sharks have been sighted frequently on this wall. This reef is also where Ned Deloach (the popular Reef Identification books co-author) discovered the rare Lemon goby.

Cathedral: This site is part of the Dog Rocks Reef. This reef starts at 35' and slopes off to 50' before dropping straight down into the Exuma Sound. The “cathedral” is a large swim-through where light filters down from above reflecting off thousands of silversides. This swim-through also has many groupers and jacks that come to feed on the silversides. The wall has large stands of black coral and orange elephant ear and tube sponges. Pelagics such as eagle rays and sharks are frequently seen just off the wall.

Cracked Coral Head: This massive coral head rises 40' off the bottom. Several large swim-thruoughs make it look like it is cracked giving it the name.

Jeep Reef: This site named for a coral-encrusted jeep that sits near the mooring is in the middle of the Exumas Land & Sea Park and hosts a healthy population of fish. It is also one of the prettiest reefs you will ever see. Current that sweeps through this cut keeps the reef 's corals healthy.

Pillar Wall: One of many excellent wall dives. It starts at 30' and slopes to 50' before dropping 5,000' to the bottom. There are many caves and crevices. There is also a large colony of yellowhead jawfish in the rubble inside the reef.


Southwest Eleuthera

Cave Rock: A large coral mound in 50' of water surrounded by several smaller coral heads. There are several caves where you can swim from one side to the other. The large variety of corals and fish will amaze you. Hammerhead sharks have been seen here frequently.

Monolith: Large mounds of coral rise out of the sand at the edge of the wall. They start at 100' depth and rise to 55'. There is a colony of garden eels in the sand next to the mounds.
 

Little San Sal (Half Moon Cay)

Cave Reef: This 40' shallow patch reef has several large swim-throughs cutting in the middle of the reef.

Empress Pinnacles: This wall dive features 30' high pinnacles coming out of the sand at the edge of the wall. Pelagic animals are seen frequently in the clear water off the wall. There are large branches of black coral growing on the sides of the pinnacles.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
06 Dec 2025
8D/7N
[Nassau-Nassau] Exuma Cays and Southwest Eleuthera [06 Dec 25 - 13 Dec 25]
Exuma Cays The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over ...
See Itinerary

Exuma Cays

The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over 120 miles from just south of new Providence to the anchor islands of Great and Little Exuma to the south. The Exuma Cays are a part of the more remote Out Islands of the Bahamas. The Cays are the most exotic of these islands, a collection of sandy jewels set in the aquamarine and sapphire of some of the most beautiful waters in the world along with an intriguing combination of walls and rich shallow reefs.

Nassau

Lost Blue Hole: The rim of this large blue hole lies in 40' of water surrounded by coral heads, stingrays, and many schools of fish. There is a lobster filled crevice at 80'. In the sand surrounding the hole, divers find many small fish such as banded jawfish, Seminole gobies, and tobacco fish. There are usually one or two nurse sharks and during the spring a large school of blacknose sharks inhabits the bottom of the 200' hole.

Periwinkle Reef: This is a shallow patch-reef teaming with fish. The local Nassau tour operators feed fish here, so sergeant majors and angelfish approach scuba divers looking for a handout.

 

Exumas

Amberjack Reef: This 50' patch-reef that has prolific fish life including reef sharks and up to ten large groupers. This dive also has many interesting small critters such as pirate blennies and garden eels. During the safety stop divers may be surrounded by 100+ horse-eye jacks that school under the yacht.

Austin Smith Wreck: A 90' Bahamian Defense Force cutter lying in 60’ of water that, ironically, sank in 1995 while being towed to San Salvador to be sunk there as a dive site.

Barracuda Shoals: This bankside patch reef has huge schools of fish as well as many small critters on the reef and surrounding sand.

Blacktip Wall: Hammerhead sharks have been sighted frequently on this wall. This reef is also where Ned Deloach (the popular Reef Identification books co-author) discovered the rare Lemon goby.

Cathedral: This site is part of the Dog Rocks Reef. This reef starts at 35' and slopes off to 50' before dropping straight down into the Exuma Sound. The “cathedral” is a large swim-through where light filters down from above reflecting off thousands of silversides. This swim-through also has many groupers and jacks that come to feed on the silversides. The wall has large stands of black coral and orange elephant ear and tube sponges. Pelagics such as eagle rays and sharks are frequently seen just off the wall.

Cracked Coral Head: This massive coral head rises 40' off the bottom. Several large swim-thruoughs make it look like it is cracked giving it the name.

Jeep Reef: This site named for a coral-encrusted jeep that sits near the mooring is in the middle of the Exumas Land & Sea Park and hosts a healthy population of fish. It is also one of the prettiest reefs you will ever see. Current that sweeps through this cut keeps the reef 's corals healthy.

Pillar Wall: One of many excellent wall dives. It starts at 30' and slopes to 50' before dropping 5,000' to the bottom. There are many caves and crevices. There is also a large colony of yellowhead jawfish in the rubble inside the reef.


Southwest Eleuthera

Cave Rock: A large coral mound in 50' of water surrounded by several smaller coral heads. There are several caves where you can swim from one side to the other. The large variety of corals and fish will amaze you. Hammerhead sharks have been seen here frequently.

Monolith: Large mounds of coral rise out of the sand at the edge of the wall. They start at 100' depth and rise to 55'. There is a colony of garden eels in the sand next to the mounds.
 

Little San Sal (Half Moon Cay)

Cave Reef: This 40' shallow patch reef has several large swim-throughs cutting in the middle of the reef.

Empress Pinnacles: This wall dive features 30' high pinnacles coming out of the sand at the edge of the wall. Pelagic animals are seen frequently in the clear water off the wall. There are large branches of black coral growing on the sides of the pinnacles.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
13 Dec 2025
8D/7N
[Nassau-Nassau] Exuma Cays and Southwest Eleuthera [13 Dec 25 - 20 Dec 25]
Exuma Cays The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over ...
See Itinerary

Exuma Cays

The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over 120 miles from just south of new Providence to the anchor islands of Great and Little Exuma to the south. The Exuma Cays are a part of the more remote Out Islands of the Bahamas. The Cays are the most exotic of these islands, a collection of sandy jewels set in the aquamarine and sapphire of some of the most beautiful waters in the world along with an intriguing combination of walls and rich shallow reefs.

Nassau

Lost Blue Hole: The rim of this large blue hole lies in 40' of water surrounded by coral heads, stingrays, and many schools of fish. There is a lobster filled crevice at 80'. In the sand surrounding the hole, divers find many small fish such as banded jawfish, Seminole gobies, and tobacco fish. There are usually one or two nurse sharks and during the spring a large school of blacknose sharks inhabits the bottom of the 200' hole.

Periwinkle Reef: This is a shallow patch-reef teaming with fish. The local Nassau tour operators feed fish here, so sergeant majors and angelfish approach scuba divers looking for a handout.

 

Exumas

Amberjack Reef: This 50' patch-reef that has prolific fish life including reef sharks and up to ten large groupers. This dive also has many interesting small critters such as pirate blennies and garden eels. During the safety stop divers may be surrounded by 100+ horse-eye jacks that school under the yacht.

Austin Smith Wreck: A 90' Bahamian Defense Force cutter lying in 60’ of water that, ironically, sank in 1995 while being towed to San Salvador to be sunk there as a dive site.

Barracuda Shoals: This bankside patch reef has huge schools of fish as well as many small critters on the reef and surrounding sand.

Blacktip Wall: Hammerhead sharks have been sighted frequently on this wall. This reef is also where Ned Deloach (the popular Reef Identification books co-author) discovered the rare Lemon goby.

Cathedral: This site is part of the Dog Rocks Reef. This reef starts at 35' and slopes off to 50' before dropping straight down into the Exuma Sound. The “cathedral” is a large swim-through where light filters down from above reflecting off thousands of silversides. This swim-through also has many groupers and jacks that come to feed on the silversides. The wall has large stands of black coral and orange elephant ear and tube sponges. Pelagics such as eagle rays and sharks are frequently seen just off the wall.

Cracked Coral Head: This massive coral head rises 40' off the bottom. Several large swim-thruoughs make it look like it is cracked giving it the name.

Jeep Reef: This site named for a coral-encrusted jeep that sits near the mooring is in the middle of the Exumas Land & Sea Park and hosts a healthy population of fish. It is also one of the prettiest reefs you will ever see. Current that sweeps through this cut keeps the reef 's corals healthy.

Pillar Wall: One of many excellent wall dives. It starts at 30' and slopes to 50' before dropping 5,000' to the bottom. There are many caves and crevices. There is also a large colony of yellowhead jawfish in the rubble inside the reef.


Southwest Eleuthera

Cave Rock: A large coral mound in 50' of water surrounded by several smaller coral heads. There are several caves where you can swim from one side to the other. The large variety of corals and fish will amaze you. Hammerhead sharks have been seen here frequently.

Monolith: Large mounds of coral rise out of the sand at the edge of the wall. They start at 100' depth and rise to 55'. There is a colony of garden eels in the sand next to the mounds.
 

Little San Sal (Half Moon Cay)

Cave Reef: This 40' shallow patch reef has several large swim-throughs cutting in the middle of the reef.

Empress Pinnacles: This wall dive features 30' high pinnacles coming out of the sand at the edge of the wall. Pelagic animals are seen frequently in the clear water off the wall. There are large branches of black coral growing on the sides of the pinnacles.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
20 Dec 2025
8D/7N
[Nassau-Nassau] Exuma Cays and Southwest Eleuthera [20 Dec 25 - 27 Dec 25]
Exuma Cays The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over ...
See Itinerary

Exuma Cays

The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over 120 miles from just south of new Providence to the anchor islands of Great and Little Exuma to the south. The Exuma Cays are a part of the more remote Out Islands of the Bahamas. The Cays are the most exotic of these islands, a collection of sandy jewels set in the aquamarine and sapphire of some of the most beautiful waters in the world along with an intriguing combination of walls and rich shallow reefs.

Nassau

Lost Blue Hole: The rim of this large blue hole lies in 40' of water surrounded by coral heads, stingrays, and many schools of fish. There is a lobster filled crevice at 80'. In the sand surrounding the hole, divers find many small fish such as banded jawfish, Seminole gobies, and tobacco fish. There are usually one or two nurse sharks and during the spring a large school of blacknose sharks inhabits the bottom of the 200' hole.

Periwinkle Reef: This is a shallow patch-reef teaming with fish. The local Nassau tour operators feed fish here, so sergeant majors and angelfish approach scuba divers looking for a handout.

 

Exumas

Amberjack Reef: This 50' patch-reef that has prolific fish life including reef sharks and up to ten large groupers. This dive also has many interesting small critters such as pirate blennies and garden eels. During the safety stop divers may be surrounded by 100+ horse-eye jacks that school under the yacht.

Austin Smith Wreck: A 90' Bahamian Defense Force cutter lying in 60’ of water that, ironically, sank in 1995 while being towed to San Salvador to be sunk there as a dive site.

Barracuda Shoals: This bankside patch reef has huge schools of fish as well as many small critters on the reef and surrounding sand.

Blacktip Wall: Hammerhead sharks have been sighted frequently on this wall. This reef is also where Ned Deloach (the popular Reef Identification books co-author) discovered the rare Lemon goby.

Cathedral: This site is part of the Dog Rocks Reef. This reef starts at 35' and slopes off to 50' before dropping straight down into the Exuma Sound. The “cathedral” is a large swim-through where light filters down from above reflecting off thousands of silversides. This swim-through also has many groupers and jacks that come to feed on the silversides. The wall has large stands of black coral and orange elephant ear and tube sponges. Pelagics such as eagle rays and sharks are frequently seen just off the wall.

Cracked Coral Head: This massive coral head rises 40' off the bottom. Several large swim-thruoughs make it look like it is cracked giving it the name.

Jeep Reef: This site named for a coral-encrusted jeep that sits near the mooring is in the middle of the Exumas Land & Sea Park and hosts a healthy population of fish. It is also one of the prettiest reefs you will ever see. Current that sweeps through this cut keeps the reef 's corals healthy.

Pillar Wall: One of many excellent wall dives. It starts at 30' and slopes to 50' before dropping 5,000' to the bottom. There are many caves and crevices. There is also a large colony of yellowhead jawfish in the rubble inside the reef.


Southwest Eleuthera

Cave Rock: A large coral mound in 50' of water surrounded by several smaller coral heads. There are several caves where you can swim from one side to the other. The large variety of corals and fish will amaze you. Hammerhead sharks have been seen here frequently.

Monolith: Large mounds of coral rise out of the sand at the edge of the wall. They start at 100' depth and rise to 55'. There is a colony of garden eels in the sand next to the mounds.
 

Little San Sal (Half Moon Cay)

Cave Reef: This 40' shallow patch reef has several large swim-throughs cutting in the middle of the reef.

Empress Pinnacles: This wall dive features 30' high pinnacles coming out of the sand at the edge of the wall. Pelagic animals are seen frequently in the clear water off the wall. There are large branches of black coral growing on the sides of the pinnacles.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00
27 Dec 2025
8D/7N
[Nassau-Nassau] Exuma Cays and Southwest Eleuthera [27 Dec 25 - 03 Jan 26]
Exuma Cays The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over ...
See Itinerary

Exuma Cays

The Exumas archipelago comprises more than 350 small islands and cays stretching over 120 miles from just south of new Providence to the anchor islands of Great and Little Exuma to the south. The Exuma Cays are a part of the more remote Out Islands of the Bahamas. The Cays are the most exotic of these islands, a collection of sandy jewels set in the aquamarine and sapphire of some of the most beautiful waters in the world along with an intriguing combination of walls and rich shallow reefs.

Nassau

Lost Blue Hole: The rim of this large blue hole lies in 40' of water surrounded by coral heads, stingrays, and many schools of fish. There is a lobster filled crevice at 80'. In the sand surrounding the hole, divers find many small fish such as banded jawfish, Seminole gobies, and tobacco fish. There are usually one or two nurse sharks and during the spring a large school of blacknose sharks inhabits the bottom of the 200' hole.

Periwinkle Reef: This is a shallow patch-reef teaming with fish. The local Nassau tour operators feed fish here, so sergeant majors and angelfish approach scuba divers looking for a handout.

 

Exumas

Amberjack Reef: This 50' patch-reef that has prolific fish life including reef sharks and up to ten large groupers. This dive also has many interesting small critters such as pirate blennies and garden eels. During the safety stop divers may be surrounded by 100+ horse-eye jacks that school under the yacht.

Austin Smith Wreck: A 90' Bahamian Defense Force cutter lying in 60’ of water that, ironically, sank in 1995 while being towed to San Salvador to be sunk there as a dive site.

Barracuda Shoals: This bankside patch reef has huge schools of fish as well as many small critters on the reef and surrounding sand.

Blacktip Wall: Hammerhead sharks have been sighted frequently on this wall. This reef is also where Ned Deloach (the popular Reef Identification books co-author) discovered the rare Lemon goby.

Cathedral: This site is part of the Dog Rocks Reef. This reef starts at 35' and slopes off to 50' before dropping straight down into the Exuma Sound. The “cathedral” is a large swim-through where light filters down from above reflecting off thousands of silversides. This swim-through also has many groupers and jacks that come to feed on the silversides. The wall has large stands of black coral and orange elephant ear and tube sponges. Pelagics such as eagle rays and sharks are frequently seen just off the wall.

Cracked Coral Head: This massive coral head rises 40' off the bottom. Several large swim-thruoughs make it look like it is cracked giving it the name.

Jeep Reef: This site named for a coral-encrusted jeep that sits near the mooring is in the middle of the Exumas Land & Sea Park and hosts a healthy population of fish. It is also one of the prettiest reefs you will ever see. Current that sweeps through this cut keeps the reef 's corals healthy.

Pillar Wall: One of many excellent wall dives. It starts at 30' and slopes to 50' before dropping 5,000' to the bottom. There are many caves and crevices. There is also a large colony of yellowhead jawfish in the rubble inside the reef.


Southwest Eleuthera

Cave Rock: A large coral mound in 50' of water surrounded by several smaller coral heads. There are several caves where you can swim from one side to the other. The large variety of corals and fish will amaze you. Hammerhead sharks have been seen here frequently.

Monolith: Large mounds of coral rise out of the sand at the edge of the wall. They start at 100' depth and rise to 55'. There is a colony of garden eels in the sand next to the mounds.
 

Little San Sal (Half Moon Cay)

Cave Reef: This 40' shallow patch reef has several large swim-throughs cutting in the middle of the reef.

Empress Pinnacles: This wall dive features 30' high pinnacles coming out of the sand at the edge of the wall. Pelagic animals are seen frequently in the clear water off the wall. There are large branches of black coral growing on the sides of the pinnacles.


Sample itineraries and maps are for illustrative purposes only. The exact route and sites visited are subject to change based on local regulations, guest experience, weather and logistics, and is at the Captain’s discretion.

From USD3,095.00

Bahamas Aggressor Cabin

(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+) (+USD0.00)
(+USD200.00)
(+USD200.00)
(+USD200.00)
(+USD200.00)
(+USD200.00)
(+USD200.00)
(+USD200.00)
(+USD200.00)
(+USD200.00)
(+USD200.00)
(+USD200.00)